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Marmish

Waffle Makers

59 posts in this topic

The husband made the executive decision to throw out our cheap hard to clean waffle maker. I'd like to replace it with something that will:

a) be easy to clean

b) make an excellent waffle

c) store relatively easily

d) last for a looong time

e) be family friendly, ie: big

f) not cost a fortune

I don't think I want a large-hole Belgian type waffle maker. And while we're on the topic, what is your favorite waffle recipe or way to eat waffles? I really like overnight yeasted waffles. We usually just eat them with syrup.

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The one I use regularly is the Black and Decker this model which is the "Classic"

Not Belgian.

It can also be used as a sandwich grill or flat griddle. The plates reverse easily.

I have had mine for about 4 years and it is easy to clean - I usually just use a nail brush after it has cooled, to sweep out any crusty bits.

Do not buy the Villaware, it is not reliable, doesn't heat evenly. I bought one and returned it.

I also have an old Sunbeam - the first of the non-stick generation of waffle irons which I use if I have guests. It is very heavy but does a nice job.

I also have several antique and vintage waffle irons - I collect kitchen electics that are unusual, Art Deco, etc. They all have to be in working condition. I have had a lot of experience with waffle irons and the non-stick are the way to go.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Um, Andie, goddess of all things kitchen and gadget related, I must disagree on the VillaWare. I have one, (albeit a belgian one) and I've never had a problem with uneven heating.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Um, Andie, goddess of all things kitchen and gadget related, I must disagree on the VillaWare.  I have one, (albeit a belgian one) and I've never had a problem with uneven heating.

I bought the 6- section "classic" and had nothing but trouble with it. First I did exchange it but the replacement had the same problem, not baking evenly it was 1000 watts, apparently not enough for the size of the plates.

I have the Belgian too, the 2 section and it works fine it is 1200 watts.

The Villaware model I wanted was the "Maxi" which is 1500 watts or the "UNO" classic that is 1200 watts, but neither were available locally and when I ordered online I kept getting a backorder notice and I needed one immediately so found the B & D at Wal-Mart and it works fine.

It is very possible that the 4 section classic Villaware has been improved and upgraded and now works quite well. However I just checked on Amazon and it doesn't get good reviews.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I'll second Andie on her recommendation of the B&D waffle iron. Mine was a birthday present from my parents over 15 years ago, and it's still working perfectly.

My favorite waffle recipe? I use the ingredients from Marion Cunningham's yeast waffle recipe minus the baking soda and about half the yeast, but I mix using the method from Cook's Illustrated's yeast waffle recipe. Basically, I mix up the batter as recommended, but I add the eggs right from the start and put the batter in the fridge to rise overnight. In the morning I preheat the waffle iron, stir the batter up, and use about 3/4 cup of batter per waffle. In the rare event that I have extras, I let them cool completely on a rack, toss them in a ziplock bag in the freezer, and toast them up another morning.

MelissaH


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Thee is a Black and Decker theme here....yup same one.

I use the Better Homes New Cookbook for the recipe. Its more of an instant gratification, I want a waffle Now recipe.

tracey


The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

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If you are interested in something that won't ever wear our, look no further than the Nordicware stove top waffle maker. No electric parts to wear out, no cords to lose, no downside. Yes, it does have deep pockets, but, there's just about nothing to go wrong with this model.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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<<I also have several antique and vintage waffle irons - I collect kitchen electics that are unusual, Art Deco, etc. They all have to be in working condition. I have had a lot of experience with waffle irons and the non-stick are the way to go.>>

Andie.....would appreciate your advice/experience!!!

I am on the verge of bidding on 2 vintage sunbeam waffle irons on ebay......the CGL and CG1. I am not a collector and really just want something like the black and decker waffler/grill posted, but I am very leary of non-stick finishes.

Would these antique irons work well or should I go for a stovetop cast iron one? I have an induction stove, no gas.

TIA

Vivienne

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We love Gingerbread Waffles.

I also make corn bread waffles (just use your favorite corn bread recipe and cook in the waffle maker) and top with pulled pork. Really, really good.

I have a recipe for coconut waffles that I am going to try soon - will check back in with that report when I have done them.

Kim

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I also make corn bread waffles (just use your favorite corn bread recipe and cook in the waffle maker) and top with pulled pork.  Really, really good. 

Whoah. That's just... genius.

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<<I also have several antique and vintage waffle irons - I collect kitchen electics that are unusual, Art Deco, etc. They all have to be in working condition. I have had a lot of experience with waffle irons and the non-stick are the way to go.>>

Andie.....would appreciate your advice/experience!!!

I am on the verge of bidding on 2 vintage sunbeam waffle irons on ebay......the CGL and CG1. I am not a collector and really just want something like the black and decker waffler/grill posted, but I am very leary of non-stick finishes.

Would these antique irons work well or should I go for a stovetop cast iron one? I have an induction stove, no gas.

TIA

Vivienne

William George, in his 2003 book: Antique Electric Waffle Irons, 1900-1960

has this to say about the Sunbeams.

"Model W-2 circa late 1940s was one of the highest quality waffle irons ever made. With 80 square inches of cooking surface, it was also one of the largest. Both the W-1 (pre-war) and W-2 were made to near-commercial quality and are a pleasure to use.

The Model CG (combination grill/waffle iron) circa 1950s, is basically a restyled W-1 and W-2 and is of near commercial quality... Unlike the previous models the CG has removable grids which could be interchanged with flat grilling grids. This iron was expensive when new and today they still command higher than normal prices on the used market. It is a nice practical everyday appliance."

I agree. I have three - one W-2 and two CGs and they bake waffles nicely and evenly (one of the CGs has the flat sandwich grills installed, although I do have the waffle grids - they show use, while the flat plates are pristine.

I personally prefer the CG-1 - rather than the CGL which has reversable grids.

The reversable grids are not all that wonderful - if you do reverse the grids and use the flat grill plates, it ruins the seasoning on the waffle grids - which means the next time you bake waffles, you have to re-season them. The CGL has lower wattage.

There are other brands that had an early "non-stick" finish, not teflon but rather a fired-on ceramic coating that worked quite well as reversable grids - they were also of higher wattage.

If you buy one that has baked-on discoloration on the waffle grids. Get Carbon-Off to clean it (outside on newspaper) as this will remove the baked on gunk without harming the cast aluminum.

You can order it online if you can't find it in a store. I buy it at Smart & Final.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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i use a 25 yr old waffle maker that makes conjoined heart-shaped waffles.

my favorite thing to do with them is to make a standard waffle batter (or the wonderful yeast waffles ala cunningham), and embed bacon strips in them. i recipe-tested the bacon half-cooked, fully cooked and raw, and raw won...i didn't think it would cook all the way through, but it does...bacon and waffle in one nifly, crispy, heart shaped package...dip 'em in maple syrup (grade b for me...) that's my favorite waffle application.


"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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wow, i'd never guess the bacon would cook through... cool tip. i'll have to give it a go sometime.

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Bacon in waffles. Pulled pork on waffles. What great ideas. My favorite recipe is from the old red plaid Better Homes and Gardens cookbook "Oh Boy Waffles." I've been eating them since my mother made them for me, and there's nothing better.

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<I personally prefer the CG-1 - rather than the CGL which has reversable grids.>

Thanks for your help..........I've finally got a CG-1 on its slow slow way to Singapore... will post when I make my first waffle

:biggrin:

Is it okay to clean the cast aluminium with steel wool? I'm really not into the hazardous chemicals (not that you can get carbon-off here anyway).

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<I personally prefer the CG-1 - rather than the CGL which has reversable grids.>

Thanks for your help..........I've finally got a CG-1 on its slow slow way to Singapore... will post when I make my first waffle

:biggrin:

Is it okay to clean the cast aluminium with steel wool? I'm really not into the hazardous chemicals (not that you can get carbon-off here anyway).

No, no and NO!

With a nail brush, dampen it slightly, dip it in DRY baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) and scrub the grids.

It will take a little effort but should remove most of the burnt-on stuff without harming the surface.

Steel wool or brillo will produce tiny scratches that make it very difficult to season the surface so it will become close to non-stick.

(I also use dry baking soda and a barely damp paper towel to keep the chrome shiny and free of black and brown baked-on spots.)

Is Dawn Power Dissolver available in Singapore?

If so, pre-treatment with it can clean waffle grids nicely, finishing with the dry baking soda scrub as above.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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........ minus the baking soda and about half the yeast

Hi Melissa

Just curious, why do you do this?What does it change compared to the original recipe?

Greg :biggrin:

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I'm also ready to get rid of my old cheap impossible-to-clean waffle iron. Has anyone tried this Krups one?


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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I don't think I ever reported back that I bought the Black and Decker and think it does a pretty good job. Which reminds me. I need to make more waffles. :smile:

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Last Fall I bought a Waring Pro Belgian Waffle Maker, model #WWM200PC. $50 at Costco, it's more at other places. It works great.

Pros:

Rotates 180 degrees. After you fill it you flip over and it makes for very light waffles.

It's easy to clean. Just wipe it down.

LED and Audio signal when they are done.

Browning Selector- Can make waffles that are just barely baked, good if you want to make extra for "toaster waffles", up to a well done VERY crispy waffle which my dad prefers. I leave them in a bit longer after the Done Signals go off to get the super brown that my dad likes.

Possible Cons (Some may think so but I do not):

Much easier to clean up if you use Pam spray instead of oil and brush. One surface is tilted up so the oil will drip down.

Not a small unit. It's big and can take up alot of space if space is at a premium for you. I keep mine in it's box in the garage and get it out when I use it about twice a month.

The recipie I like best so far, and I'm still searching, is the one from Christopher Kimball's The Cook's Bible, page 350. I add some sugar to the buttermilk recipe and leave out the cornmeal. The Sweet Milk Variation he offers is way to bitter for my taste. But as I said I'm still searching for an A-1 recipe.

Nancy HM, Would you post the recipe for those Oh Boy Waffles? I'd sure appreciate it. I have the old red and white 1950's Betty Crocker Cookbook but not the BH&G one.


Edited by Susie Q (log)

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Thanks for your help..........I've finally got a CG-1 on its slow slow way to Singapore... will post when I make my first waffle

So my "brand-new" vintage CG1 sunbeam has finally arrived after 2 months on a slow slow boat........

This is my first waffle iron and as I hope to plate my first ever waffles this weekend, does anyone out there have some (very) basic instructions for this waffle iron?

What setting do I use? How do I know when it's the right temperature? How much batter to use? Do I wash the grids after finishing or just wipe down? To oil or not?????

Thanks in advance,

Vivienne

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I recommend this recipe:

Best Waffle recipe

virtually foolproof for starting out.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I have to ask: why does it seem like it's difficult to buy a regular, family-size waffle maker?

My wife and I had a small waffle maker we received for a wedding present (15 yrs ago) and, now with a family, wanted a larger one. Growing up, my mom had a four-waffle waffle iron. Not a dinky one-waffle waffle iron that my wife and I had.

I eventually found one (a B&D at Lowe's), but it took months. We looked at a number of places, and only saw Belgian waffle makers or small ones.

Belgian waffles are fine, but they're not what we wanted.

So, are regular waffles in decline? Are American waffle tastes going Belgian?

My wife and I were surprised at how difficult it was to find a family-size waffle iron.

Has anyone else experienced this?

--Mike

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Belgian waffles are fine, but they're not what we wanted.

So, are regular waffles in decline? Are American waffle tastes going Belgian?

I believe Belgian waffles were introduced by chain restaurants. It's more efficient for them because they can make more waffle faster using the same amount of griddle, saving both time and space in the kitchen, which equals more $! (Belgian waffles are about 1.5 times thicker than traditional waffles)

Once people got used to eating "Belgian Waffles" the home appliance market followed.

SB (prefers the thinner waffles himself :wink: )

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