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tetsujustin

Jamie at Home - New Jamie Oliver show

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I saw a few commercials for this show, it finally looks like a really, really promising one. I'm not sure if this is a draw from BBC or if it's Foodnetwork produced, but it looks like Jamie Oliver pulls from his own garden at home and cooks seasonally and simply-- something that's been missing on foodtv for forever, a real cook cooking what looks to be quality food.

I for one am at least excited at the fact that it's someone who has a real sense of food coming back to cook instead of wasting time watching home cooks, this may be more directed towards those who have more experience in the kitchen. Plus watching the commercial, you see the produce pulled directly from the ground... maybe a food geek sort of thing.

Anyway, the premiere is January 12th

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Hi Justin,

I've seen all the episodes, including the Christmas special where he cooks a goose and a turkey (there's an extremely boring 8 minutes of chatting with Gennaro at the end). The entire 13-episode run was shown on Foodtv Canada and Discovery: Travel and Living. I think it's not produced by the BBC (Fresh something, I forgot).

This is one of the best (non-pastry) cooking shows I've seen in a while. The pace is very relaxed (unlike Oliver's Twist); it really inspires you to start growing your own and enjoy "the simple life." The sounds of birds chirping in the background and the sunlight shining through the trees gives the show a unique atmosphere. The food always looks good (of course stylists have worked their magic on it by the final shot-- but the look is always natural).


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I'm also looking forward to this after seeing the previews. Planting, growing, harvesting, cooking, eating: a much needed return to basics.

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The shows he did on his trips around Italy were profound and wonderful on a bunch of levels...

I'm looking forward to this series...

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I'm watching an episode right now, actually. I was just saying that he's cooking really simply -- things that most people can attempt themselves. Well, of course we don't all have access to all of the fresh ingredients that he and the gardener pull out of his garden. But, he's cooking the way I like to cook.

I like the show. It's nice to have some real cooking on FoodTV. It would also be nice to have a huge garden with a gardener and a nice wood burning oven out back . .

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Also, you have got to love that there's none of that "garbage bowl" business (kidding!)-- whatever food waste he makes outdoors, he flings to the side. Excellent.

There's also food prepared inside, though. Though I wonder how many people he will actually inspire to make tomato ketchup at home.

I've heard they filmed much more than 14 episodes, going through the four seasons. What we're seeing is really a sampler, and they could show more if they renew the show. I really hope they do, but since the complete 13-episode DVD has already been released, I wonder if it's pretty much over.


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I've heard they filmed much more than 14 episodes, going through the four seasons. What we're seeing is really a sampler, and they could show more if they renew the show. I really hope they do, but since the complete 13-episode DVD has already been released, I wonder if it's pretty much over.

I really enjoyed the series..I hope they show more of them. His garden is spectacular.

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I also believe this is one of Jamie's best show. I hate the series he made in Italy mostly because it was too centred on him, as with most of his shows... but this one is more about ingredients.

It would have been nice to see his gardener a bit more... but I guess his very calm attitude and voice was too much a contrast with Jamie :raz:

And I am extremely jealous of his garden and wood oven... :wink:

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Looking forward to this show, but I am ticked that FN America never aired his school lunch show. That looked amazing.

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I will have to add Jan. 12 to my calendar!

I never liked Jamie Oliver in his very early cooking shows. He made things like fried bread with bacon sandwiches and stuff I just was not interested in eating.

But I think he's come a long way since those days and has more of an international taste and a deeper understanding of food. I just bought his latest cookbook "Cook with Jamie" and it has some great looking side dishes.

Somehow I missed the Italy series, was that shown in the US?

Glad to see Food Network is bringing in a REAL chef!


*****

"Did you see what Julia Child did to that chicken?" ... Howard Borden on "Bob Newhart"

*****

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I think Jamie's Italy was indeed shown in the US, maybe it was broadcast by it's alternate title, Jamie's Great Escape? In any case, I seemed to always catch the episodes where the locals are dissing his avant-garde food and he saves the day by cooking very traditional dishes. I own the companion book, "Jamie's Italy," and the recipes are very classic and rustic, since that was the moral lesson of the series :laugh:

If you liked the "Cook With Jamie" book, then you're sure to like "Jamie at Home" :smile:


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I watched a few episodes on Food Network Canada as well and, like others, appreciated the simplicity of his preparations. Also envious of his garden and outdoor wood-fired oven. Man, would that be sweet to have.

Jamie seems different, more mature and low-key. I always had the impression, from his earlier shows, that he was a tad full of himself and a little too sloppy in his thinking and approach to what he was doing. I like that he's a bit more grounded and grown up, although sometimes it can make for boring viewing. It'd be nice to see him throw in a bit more humour and spontaneity. Bottom line, though, I like the series.

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Another small criticism: it's a bit salad-leaning (not salad-heavy, though). Among the episodes, you have: Strawberry (salad), Bean (salad), Carrot (salad), Courgette (salad), Onion (salad), Summer Salad, and Summer Brassicas.

It seems that there is indeed a new season! I've visited the Official Channel 4 Site and there are descriptions for a few episodes I haven't seen-- Mushrooms, Game, Winter Greens, and Chili Peppers. I don't own the "companion" book so I don't really know how much material they prepared.


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I absolutely ADORE Jamie at Home! It's shown here in Australia atm and I've been recording most of the episodes :)

I love the whole 'fresh produce' approach and the feel of the show itself is very casual and personal, two aspects I really appreciate, particularly in relation to all things food. Ooh and the rustic-ness of the show is something else I really enjoy.

Like someone mentioned above, I'm not sure if I will ever make my own tomato ketchup (tomato sauce for us Aussies) to be honest hahahhaa. I'm not too big on making things that are THAT readily available at the supermarkets.

About Jamie in Italy, I think it was shown in Oz, but I somehow missed it...not sure how.

I find that Jame at Home is still fairly Italian-based anyway. Just one thing I'm hoping for is Jamie to experiment with other cuisines a bit more.


Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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I will have to add Jan. 12 to my calendar! 

I never liked Jamie Oliver in his very early cooking shows.  He made things like fried bread with bacon sandwiches and stuff I just was not interested in eating.

Just so's you know, a buttered and fried bacon sandwich is a staple of U.K. comfort food. Think the British version of mac-n-cheese or meat loaf and mashed potatoes.

Think of the warm fuzzies you'd get watching Johnny Depp make you some chicken soup 'cause you have the tiniest case of the sniffles. That's what you were supposed to get out of the bacon butties, I bet. :wub::wink:

The adverts for this new show have made me wish I could get brown and nekkid in the sunshine. Winter stinks.


“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”

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The adverts for this new show have made me wish I could get brown and nekkid in the sunshine. Winter stinks.

YES IT REALLY DOES! :sad:

at least it ends tho

i am looking forward to this as well

did you see that jamie and mario are going to be on iron chef i think this sunday or soon?

i liked his jamie's kitchen kind of ramsay with kids

other shows with him and his "mates" eh take or leave em

he seems like a good guy overall but mostly i am looking forward to a COOKING show on food tv that doesnt include the words "my honey" "groovy" "awesome" and "ya'll"

s

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Yup, Jamie vs. Mario this January 6. So.... Is there a betting pool? :laugh: Much as I love Jamie, I'd say Mario would win it. I would love to watch it, though! We only get repeats of ICA here, it would probably take months or years before I get to see it.

I just watched an episode of Jamie's Great Italian Escape. He visits a monastery in Farfa with a famous ancient herb garden, but he's disappointed to find that the garden's been neglected and almost dead, and the monks' great cooking tradition has been replaced by tinned vegetables and fish fingers. I think at one point Jamie was about to cry as he was expecting good food in exchange for early morning prayers and chores :laugh: (The monastery used to be inhabited by close to 70 monks, but now there are only 7. Their excuse for not caring about food much is that they're now too busy to tend to it, which I completely understand when you're trying to manage a massive structure when there are only a handful of you.)

Anyway, he raises enough money to buy new herbs and revive the garden while teaching the youngest monks the basics. At one point, the young monk in charge of the food asks Jamie sheepishly to help him make risotto as the others requested it. When I saw the monk follow Jamie around with notebook and pen in hand, writing instructions diligently, I think a little tear came out of my eye :smile: It was very sweet.

I can't wait to hear what you guys think of the show when it airs in a week.


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I love on this show how when he is cooking outside he just chucks stuff on the floor and drains liquids right onto the benchtop or the ground. I wish I could cook like that at home and just hose the kitchen down after...


"Alternatively, marry a good man or woman, have plenty of children, and train them to do it while you drink a glass of wine and grow a moustache." -Moby Pomerance

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from the sound of it, lets just hope that this isn't a small run show. Lets also hope I can get my tivo working in time too.

I'm also really excited about the iron chef battle this week. Is fifteen Jamie's only restaurant? And does he change his crew every year? (I haven't rooted around to look)

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I saw a few commercials for this show, it finally looks like a really, really promising one.

I for one am at least excited at the fact that it's someone who has a real sense of food coming back to cook . . .

. . . you see the produce pulled directly from the ground... maybe a food geek sort of thing.

Anyway, the premiere is January 12th

You are right, it is very good. I caught parts of several shows over the break and I say thumbs up.

He's never been a pretentious TV personality, quite the opposite really, but I am pleased to see him so relaxed and sincere while creating great food at home. He makes me want to expand my garden.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I've owned the companion book (from Amazon UK) for quiet some time and been enjoying it very much. SO, I am very glad to FN actually picked this show up. Saw last nights 'preview' episode after the Iron Chef battle and it is certainly a promising new show. Looking forward to more of it.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Every chance I get to see that book, I leaf through it (it's quite expensive... £25). Beautiful. When I saw him prepare the strawberry salad with grilled halloumi, I immediately made something similar. Ditto for the grilled peach salad.

EDIT: Aw, Oliver lost to Batali. Oh well. It's the first time I've heard of cobia. I heard it at least wasn't an embarrassing defeat.


Edited by jumanggy (log)

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I never liked Jamie Oliver in his very early cooking shows.  He made things like fried bread with bacon sandwiches and stuff I just was not interested in eating.

I agree with this, and wasn't sure what to expect with this new version of Jamie Oliver. I have only seen one episode so far, the one where he makes the spicy pork and chilli-pepper goulash and the hot-smoked salmon with chilli salsa. And while I will not be hot smoking salmon in a cookie tin in my own kitchen, the recipes so far seem very clean and true to fresh food, very much the way I like to cook. He still has that youthful enthusiasm and irreverence, but it seems like his food has matured quite a bit. I hope the rest of the series is as good as this first episode.


"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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I enjoyed last night's episode a lot. I've been trying to remember what all he put in those lovely stuffed peppers.

Does anyone remember?

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