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2008 Cookbooks & References


gfron1
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Books that I'm interested in for 2008:

Ma Gastronomie by Fernand Point

How to Pick a Peach: The Search for Flavor from Farm to Table by Russ Parsons

A Pig in Provence: Good Food and Simple Pleasures in the South of France by Georgeanne Brennan

Garde Manger: The Art and Craft of the Cold Kitchen by The Culinary Institute of America

Artichoke to Za'atar: Modern Middle Eastern Food by Greg Malouf

The Lebanese Cookbook by Hussein Dekmak

The Belarusian Cookbook by Alexander Bely

Classic German Cookbook: 70 traditional recipes from Germany, Austria, Hungary and Czechoslovakia, shown step-by-step in 300 photographs by Lesley Chamberlain

What are you looking forward to?

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it appears to be a brand new edition.

Nice, I see it now. Definitely on my list - I guess I have the second edition, not the first, and it is a superb textbook, though it sounds like they will be adding a lot of preparation photos to the new edition. CIA's books always have great photographs of the finished dishes, but as someone trying to "follow along at home" I appreciate photos of the steps along the way as well.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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  • 2 weeks later...
Books that I'm interested in for 2008:

Artichoke to Za'atar: Modern Middle Eastern Food by Greg Malouf

I believe that this is a repackaging/update of one of his previous books, "Arabesque".

Nonetheless, Arabesque is a wonderful book, so if you don't have it, Artichoke to Za'atar will be a great addition to any collection of Middle Eastern cookbooks.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Books that I'm interested in for 2008:

A Pig in Provence: Good Food and Simple Pleasures in the South of France by Georgeanne Brennan

 

don't expect a lot of recipes from this title, it is more memoir with a few recipes per chapter. (we got this as an advanced readers copy last year). it reads quickly and is quite fun.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Books that I'm interested in for 2008:

Artichoke to Za'atar: Modern Middle Eastern Food by Greg Malouf

I believe that this is a repackaging/update of one of his previous books, "Arabesque".

I think Arabesque was written by Claudia Roden.

Christine

The Malouf book came first! i WAS surprised Roden named her book Arabesque when she had to have known about the Malouf book, especially since it's such a great book. Naughty, Claudie!

Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

Twitter @RanchoGordo

"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

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Aye but geez, about 9 months off yet.

I'd also have to pay just as much for the book as i would in postage. But it does look worthwhile.

Yeah, it's a long wait and the difference in shipping between the U.S. and Canada was pretty steep but that's often the case so I just quit thinking about it and hit the "order" button. Now I have to wait (im)patiently. The website is supposed to launch in may so that may help make the wait a little easier.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Ooh, thanks for the tip, Rob! I have no idea who these authors are so maybe someone could give me some tips on who/what to look out for... :smile:

Advanced Bread and Pastry by Michael Suas

The Pastry Chef's Companion: A Comprehensive Resource Guide for the Baking and Pastry Professional by Glenn Rinsky and Laura Halpin Rinsky (their names are soooo familiar.. I think I saw it in a magazine, I can't remember..)

EDIT: Oh, they wrote an article about high-ratio cake in an issue of Pastry Art and Design I own. Warning: link above is very strange.. :)

Mantra: The Rules of Indulgence by Jehangir Mehta

Decadent Desserts: Recipes from Vaux-le-Vicomte by Cristina De Vogue, Thomas Dhellemmes, and Delphine De Montalier

Edited by jumanggy (log)

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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That's what I thought but Amazon listed it as a 2008.  I just re-checked and it shows 2007...geez was I in Amazon.ca or something.  Very odd.

Nice try Rob, but I've had the book for months (and I got it from amazon.ca).

Having said that, from your initial post, I didn't think you were necessarily limiting it to books that are published in 2008, but those you are interested in reading in 2008. :wink:

Books that I'm interested in for 2008:
Artichoke to Za'atar: Modern Middle Eastern Food by Greg Malouf

The Lebanese Cookbook by Hussein Dekmak

Both of these are appealing. I hope somebody posts a report this year.

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I too was struck that some of those titles are books I have, or have seen, from past years.

Point's 1969 book (my English-language Lyceum edition 1974, bought used for $7.48) is one that's often referred to, even while long out of print. (Several others have that status and surface occasionally in discussions here on eGullet and other food communities.) I thought Russ Parsons's new ("Peach") book was remarkable when I got it last year because of the unusual angle -- like his previous ("French Fry") title but more so, I think -- combining agricultural and kitchen perspectives. (I told him so. He has posted on eG for some years, and credits the site in his acknowledgments.)

I guess one implicit message here is that not all highly worthwhile food books are right off the press! Some people even go further than that ...

--------

Fernand Point himself, curiously, had a kind of pyramidal look ... -- Ma Gastronomie

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...i WAS surprised Roden named her book Arabesque when she had to have known about the Malouf book, especially since it's such a great book.

Like the parallel case of the third talked-about recent food book titled Secret Ingredients. (If I wrote a book review for the latest one, I'd name it something like "Secret Ingredients -- a new book genre." If you do see published professional reviews, look to see if they mention the previous books with the same title -- which would be hard for someone to miss, if they were watching food books in recent years.)

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  • 1 month later...

Two new cookbooks released in Australia

"The Press Club - Modern Greek Cooking" by George Columbaris. IT sells for $AUS 45.00 Columbaris did some molecular gastronomy in Melbourne before returning to his Greek heritage. But his Greek cooking is refined - you could almost call it haute Greek.

"Cooking At Home" by Karen Martini. This is another hardcover, and it sells for $AUS 55.00. It's a collection of recipes from her newspaper column. Martini is known for her work at various Maurizo Terzini restaurants such as Icebergs (Sydney) and Melbourne Wine Room (Melbourne).

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Another two that caught my eye, again, both are Australian books.

"Eat Ate" by Guy Mirabella. It's a hardback and costs "AUS50.00 It's rustic Italian food, and there's nothing in there that you wouldn't find in many other Italian cookbooks. However, it's an exceptionally pretty book - buy it for the pictures and layout.

"Tree To Table - Cooking With Australian Olive Oil" by Patrice Newell. It's also a hardback and it costs $AUS60.00 As you'd expect, this book is about the Australian olive oil industry. The first part has a history of the Australian industry and information on how the oil is extracted. The second part has recipes from various Australian chefs.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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I'm looking foward to "Maze" and "Pierre". Cookbooks from reputable restaurants. I get a lot of my books from amazon.co.uk. Shipping sucks, but there are so many great cookbooks that you can only get in Europe.

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  • 2 months later...

Looking forward to Ottolenghi -- I really enjoyed what I ate at their London food shops.

Also -- Heirloom Beans: Great Recipes for Dips and Spreads, Soups and Stews, Salads and Salsas, and Much More from Rancho Gordo. I'm always interested in new bean recipes.

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  • 3 months later...
Also -- Heirloom Beans: Great Recipes for Dips and Spreads, Soups and Stews, Salads and Salsas, and Much More from Rancho Gordo. I'm always interested in new bean recipes.

Anyone seen this one, yet? It should be out shortly according to Amazon, but I find books often come out earlier than stated (at least from Amazon).

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Also -- Heirloom Beans: Great Recipes for Dips and Spreads, Soups and Stews, Salads and Salsas, and Much More from Rancho Gordo. I'm always interested in new bean recipes.

Anyone seen this one, yet? It should be out shortly according to Amazon, but I find books often come out earlier than stated (at least from Amazon).

The original date was 9/1. Even though the book is in warehouses ready to ship, they changed the date to 9/17. Growing and cooking beans makes much more sense than the publishing industry.

If you're in the bay area this Sunday, we're having a book signing at the Jimtown store in Healdsburg. Invite.

Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

Twitter @RanchoGordo

"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

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