Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Malt barley powder vs malt powder?


Recommended Posts

I cannot find malt powder anywhere (the stuff one would use to, for example, make a malted milkshake). Finally called the hippie store, and they have malt barley powder in bulk, which I bought. I'm wonder if the only difference is that the stuff I bought doesn't have dried milk solids in it. Please advise. Thanks!

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ovaltine is chocolate malt. I was in search of plain malt.

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oddly enough, here in eastern Pennsylvania, in a Philly suburb I can find it in most supermarkets ( Carnation brand) especially Genuardi's Markets. Also in Philly, in several Chinese Markets on Race St., you can get Horlick's Malt powder.

Just purchased some at each place late in November for holiday baking. Hope that helps. In SF, check out the big Chinese markets...

I'd rather be making cheese; growing beets or smoking briskets.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had that problem myself, until it was explained to me that malted XXXX, is a grain, usually barley, that has been spouted, dried, and then ground. So if you have straigt malt, or barley malt, you might want to add some powdered milk and a bit of sugar, put it in the processor or blender to really mix well, then sift, store, and use.

So I suppose one could have mung bean malt (feh!), etc, etc. This could spawn a whole new cottage industry and thread.

Regards,

Theabroma

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you google Malt drink +recipe you'll find lots that you can use your malt powder for. I use malt powder in Pain Brie and croissants. It adds great flavour. Here's a link to a drink recipe: http://www.floras-hideout.com/drrecipes/re...lted_Milk_Shake - I haven't tried it, just wanted to give an example.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you looked for Carnation Malt powder?  I buy in in a small border town in MI so I'd think you'd be able to find it in Safeway in SF.

Looked in several Safeways and phoned several others with no luck. None at the one Whole Foods I called and none at the yuppie gourmet grocery stores I called.

If you google Malt drink +recipe you'll find lots that you can use your malt powder for.

In this thread, I was stating that I actually could not find any malt and had to buy malt barley powder. I was wondering if it could be used just like malt or not.

Edited by MsRamsey (log)

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Check the rainbow coop over on 13th in SOMA. I hate malt unless its in my beer so I dont really know for sure.

If I do see any I will let you know where I got it. But I would bet the rainbow coop has it.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to post
Share on other sites
Check the rainbow coop over on 13th in SOMA.  I hate malt unless its in my beer so I dont really know for sure.

If I do see any I will let you know where I got it.  But I would bet the rainbow coop has it.

Thanks--that's where I got the barley malt powder.

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

Link to post
Share on other sites
If you google Malt drink +recipe you'll find lots that you can use your malt powder for.

In this thread, I was stating that I actually could not find any malt and had to buy malt barley powder. I was wondering if it could be used just like malt or not.

Here's the ingredient list from what I buy as "malt powder": Malted barley flour, dextrose, flour. Is there an ingredient list on your package? I'm pretty sure it's the same thing as malt powder, it's just not the drink mix.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I was just reading Ong's book and he says,

Horlicks is a powdered malted barley, wheat, and dairy drink mix <SNIP>.  The description may not sound very appetizing, and it is advertised as 'the great family nourisher,' but it tastes wonderful when used in desserts.  It adds a fuller, earthier flavor than regular malted powder.
Link to post
Share on other sites
I was just reading Ong's book and he says,
Horlicks is a powdered malted barley, wheat, and dairy drink mix <SNIP>.  The description may not sound very appetizing, and it is advertised as 'the great family nourisher,' but it tastes wonderful when used in desserts.  It adds a fuller, earthier flavor than regular malted powder.

IMHO, this company's malt powder is better than Horlick's, Carnation, you name it. I tasted all of them in my quest to find the perfect malt powder for soda fountain "malteds." The Horlick company was founded in Wisconsin, with branches eventually opening in New York and England in the late 1800s. I have read that the malt powder made by CTL Foods, which is located in Wisconsin, is based on the original formula.

Ilene

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...

Have you looked for Carnation Malt powder? I buy in in a small border town in MI so I'd think you'd be able to find it in Safeway in SF.

Hi Randy,

Could you please tell me where you buy the malt powder. Our small gang of chocolateers were taking a class yesterday at Kerry Beal's and made the most delicious Malt Meltaways. I don't seem to be able to get malt powder in Peterpatch and thought perhaps, if all else fails, I'll stop by the 'small border town in MI' and pick some up on the way to the Heartland.

Thanks.

Or...has anyone found it or Horlick's elsewhere in Ontario????

Cancel, cancel...just found Horlick's at our local bulk store. :wub:

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to post
Share on other sites

Malted milk powder is a mix of dried non-fat milk with malt sugar (maltose). It's the malt sugar that has the characteristic "malt" flavor. Malted barley, whether whole or powdered does not yet contain malt sugar. It has starch and enzymes (alpha amylase) - the enzymes are created in the malting process. To convert the starches to sugars the malted barley powder would have to be steeped in 158 degree F water for a few minutes. That allows the enzymes to attack the starch and convert it to sugar. (This process, btw, is called "mashing".)

So powdered malted barley probably won't give you the flavor you're after. (Don't be fooled by tasting the powder because your saliva is full of alpha amylase and will covert the starches to sugars in your mouth.)

I haven't looked for malted milk powder in a while (primarily because I am lactose intolerant) but it's hard to believe you can't find it. Look in the ice cream aisle where they have the toppings. If you still can't find it then try a homebrew supply store. They will sell powdered malt extract which will be close to pure maltose - get the lightest they have.

Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My T shirt site: Guy Bling

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

Malted milk powder is a mix of dried non-fat milk with malt sugar (maltose). It's the malt sugar that has the characteristic "malt" flavor. Malted barley, whether whole or powdered does not yet contain malt sugar. It has starch and enzymes (alpha amylase) - the enzymes are created in the malting process. To convert the starches to sugars the malted barley powder would have to be steeped in 158 degree F water for a few minutes. That allows the enzymes to attack the starch and convert it to sugar. (This process, btw, is called "mashing".)

So powdered malted barley probably won't give you the flavor you're after. (Don't be fooled by tasting the powder because your saliva is full of alpha amylase and will covert the starches to sugars in your mouth.)

I haven't looked for malted milk powder in a while (primarily because I am lactose intolerant) but it's hard to believe you can't find it. Look in the ice cream aisle where they have the toppings. If you still can't find it then try a homebrew supply store. They will sell powdered malt extract which will be close to pure maltose - get the lightest they have.

Thanks for the very clear explanation. Malt has always been one of those things that I just didn't understand! Would it make a difference to the flavour if the germinated grain is rice rather than barley? I'm seeing a lot of 'malt syrup' results when I do a search for maltose. Many of them say the base grain is rice - yet speak of a fragrance of malt...

Personally I use organic ingredients and was searching to see if there was such a thing as organic maltose. All I came up with is the maltose syrup sourced from germinated organic rice. Thoughts?

I'm also thinking the the milk powder component wouldn't be necessary if using it to make a malt chocolate or ice cream float where milk/cream is predominant??

Link to post
Share on other sites

Malted milk powder is a mix of dried non-fat milk with malt sugar (maltose). It's the malt sugar that has the characteristic "malt" flavor. Malted barley, whether whole or powdered does not yet contain malt sugar. It has starch and enzymes (alpha amylase) - the enzymes are created in the malting process. To convert the starches to sugars the malted barley powder would have to be steeped in 158 degree F water for a few minutes. That allows the enzymes to attack the starch and convert it to sugar. (This process, btw, is called "mashing".)

So powdered malted barley probably won't give you the flavor you're after. (Don't be fooled by tasting the powder because your saliva is full of alpha amylase and will covert the starches to sugars in your mouth.)

I haven't looked for malted milk powder in a while (primarily because I am lactose intolerant) but it's hard to believe you can't find it. Look in the ice cream aisle where they have the toppings. If you still can't find it then try a homebrew supply store. They will sell powdered malt extract which will be close to pure maltose - get the lightest they have.

Thanks for the very clear explanation. Malt has always been one of those things that I just didn't understand! Would it make a difference to the flavour if the germinated grain is rice rather than barley? I'm seeing a lot of 'malt syrup' results when I do a search for maltose. Many of them say the base grain is rice - yet speak of a fragrance of malt...

Personally I use organic ingredients and was searching to see if there was such a thing as organic maltose. All I came up with is the maltose syrup sourced from germinated organic rice. Thoughts?

I'm also thinking the the milk powder component wouldn't be necessary if using it to make a malt chocolate or ice cream float where milk/cream is predominant??

The source of the maltose really doesn't matter, but barley is the grain used most often. And you're right, the milk component doesn't add much, except that on it's own, dried matlose is very hygroscopic meaning it absorbs water like crazy. If you leave it unsealed in a few days you'll have solid lump. The milk may keep that from happening.

Maltose is "organic" by it's nature, but you probably mean you want the base grain used to be organically grown. Haven't heard of it, but organic malted barley is certainly available. A homebrew store would be your best bet.

Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My T shirt site: Guy Bling

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was taking a look at the ingredients list of Valrhona's Jivara milk chocolate (1 of my all time favourites). The last ingredient is barley malt extract. Seeing as this topic is so fresh I thought I would include this little tidbit.

Also, for anyone interested in using organically sourced ingredients - I found some barley malt extract which is certified organic: http://www.breworganic.com/catalog/Malt_extract.htm

I also found this great explanation on barley malt extract; mind you it's in reference to the brewing industry but interesting nontheless: http://www.tapbrewpub.com/what_is%20malt.htm

Link to post
Share on other sites
I was just reading Ong's book and he says,
Horlicks is a powdered malted barley, wheat, and dairy drink mix <SNIP>.  The description may not sound very appetizing, and it is advertised as 'the great family nourisher,' but it tastes wonderful when used in desserts.  It adds a fuller, earthier flavor than regular malted powder.

IMHO, this company's malt powder is better than Horlick's, Carnation, you name it. I tasted all of them in my quest to find the perfect malt powder for soda fountain "malteds." The Horlick company was founded in Wisconsin, with branches eventually opening in New York and England in the late 1800s. I have read that the malt powder made by CTL Foods, which is located in Wisconsin, is based on the original formula.

I know this post was from 2 years ago, but, I've gotten fed up with Carnation and am looking for something better. In what way is CTL malt better? For the amount I plan on purchasing (2.5 lb.), CTL is $2/lb more than the retail Carnation I'm buying. If I did a little searching, I could probably find Carnation at half the price. Is CTL really worth twice as much?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I was just reading Ong's book and he says,
Horlicks is a powdered malted barley, wheat, and dairy drink mix <SNIP>.  The description may not sound very appetizing, and it is advertised as 'the great family nourisher,' but it tastes wonderful when used in desserts.  It adds a fuller, earthier flavor than regular malted powder.

IMHO, this company's malt powder is better than Horlick's, Carnation, you name it. I tasted all of them in my quest to find the perfect malt powder for soda fountain "malteds." The Horlick company was founded in Wisconsin, with branches eventually opening in New York and England in the late 1800s. I have read that the malt powder made by CTL Foods, which is located in Wisconsin, is based on the original formula.

I know this post was from 2 years ago, but, I've gotten fed up with Carnation and am looking for something better. In what way is CTL malt better? For the amount I plan on purchasing (2.5 lb.), CTL is $2/lb more than the retail Carnation I'm buying. If I did a little searching, I could probably find Carnation at half the price. Is CTL really worth twice as much?

Short answer - it's just better! Give it a try - I think you'll agree.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is CTL really worth twice as much?

From Kerry: Short answer - it's just better! Give it a try - I think you'll agree.

Short question for Kerry: did we use Horlick's or this CTL when making Malt Meltaways? I found the Malt Meltaways a delicious problem in that I could not keep from nibbling on them...but I found my Malted Ice Cream (DL's recipe) no problem. Too sweet for me, although Ed and our company gobbled it up like crazy. My sweet tooth is not that great usually.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...