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Dedicated Omelet Pan?


Shel_B
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Recently I came across a book about cooking eggs, and in many instances a carbon steel omelet pan was used. The pan looks as though it would be great for making wonderful, buttery omelets. The sides have a nice angle to aid in sliding the eggs out of the pan, and the material and thickness of the pan suggests quick, even heating and rapid cool down.

How might a dedicated omelet pan compare to a good quality clad or disk-bottomed, SS lined skillet, like All-Clad, Calphalon, Demeyer and the like?

After reading some of the recipes and techniques, it seems like it may be fun - and make good sense - to use a dedicated omelet pan. What are your thoughts on this?

shel

 ... Shel


 

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Recently I came across a book about cooking eggs, and in many instances a carbon steel omelet pan was used. The pan looks as though it would be great for making wonderful, buttery omelets. The sides have a nice angle to aid in sliding the eggs out of the pan, and the material and thickness of the pan suggests quick, even heating and rapid cool down.

How might a dedicated omelet pan compare to a good quality clad or disk-bottomed, SS lined skillet, like All-Clad, Calphalon, Demeyer and the like?

After reading some of the recipes and techniques, it seems like it may be fun - and make good sense - to use a dedicated omelet pan. What are your thoughts on this?

shel

I don't think the pan is so essential...I mean any good pan with a reasonable shape works for me. More important is getting the pan to the right temp so that the egg sizzles and comes free w/o sticking. A little evoo or butter, a smooth surface and the right temp seem to work real well for me. Even camping with 99-cent store pans works if you get the heat source just right (but that lacks predictability.)

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Is there a reason not to use a good non-stick pan? I just got a new one as an early Christmas gift (Dupont Autograph) and it made a perfect omelet this morning--no browning, still custardy in the middle, just delicious. This pan isn't even an omelet-style pan; it's got sloped sides and no definition between the bottom and sides. Why would I want to use stainless instead of this?

"Degenerates. Degenerates. They'll all turn into monkeys." --Zizek on vegetarians

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I have a couple of dedicated pans...one cast iron for sweet stuff, one for savory. One non-stick whose only function is eggs or pancakes.

I think it's whatever is comfy for you.

“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”
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Is there a reason not to use a good non-stick pan?  I just got a new one as an early Christmas gift (Dupont Autograph) and it made a perfect omelet this morning--no browning, still custardy in the middle, just delicious.  This pan isn't even an omelet-style pan; it's got sloped sides and no definition between the bottom and sides.  Why would I want to use stainless instead of this?

I don't use nonstick anymore because the coating either needs to be babied or it doesn't last. Maybe others have more luck with it, but I don't feel good about using it. So I just use nice stainless pans even for delicate things like omelets and fish.

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Is there a reason not to use a good non-stick pan?  I just got a new one as an early Christmas gift (Dupont Autograph) and it made a perfect omelet this morning--no browning, still custardy in the middle, just delicious.  This pan isn't even an omelet-style pan; it's got sloped sides and no definition between the bottom and sides.  Why would I want to use stainless instead of this?

I don't use nonstick anymore because the coating either needs to be babied or it doesn't last. Maybe others have more luck with it, but I don't feel good about using it. So I just use nice stainless pans even for delicate things like omelets and fish.

My experience with non-stick is that it doesn't create the same type of exterior but some kind of dry lacey outer surface that I don't like too much.

Conor 610: You also said no browning, but I think a little browning here is what one wants.

Now as far as cooking with less fat then I'm sure non-stick is the way to go, but that's why I use EVOO (and lately give the pan a quick wipe before pouring in the egg.)

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Conor 610: You also said no browning, but I think a little browning here is what one wants.

I'll bet *this* is a point of contention on eGullet :smile: . If I'm making a delicately flavored omelet, there better be no browning of the eggs! A big American-style filled-with-everything, on the other hand, I am less particular about. Regarding pans, I thing nearly anything can be made to work, but I prefer a nonstick for omelets. I'm not real hard on the pan when I'm preparing eggs, and as far as I am concerned inexpensive non-stick pans are nearly disposable (well, Goodwill-able anyway).

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Chris Hennes
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Is there a reason not to use a good non-stick pan?  I just got a new one as an early Christmas gift (Dupont Autograph) and it made a perfect omelet this morning--no browning, still custardy in the middle, just delicious.  This pan isn't even an omelet-style pan; it's got sloped sides and no definition between the bottom and sides.  Why would I want to use stainless instead of this?

I've read, but not tested, the theory that non-stick pans contribute to making omeletes that have a more "rubbery" feel to them.

Plus, I never suggested that one shouldn't use a non-stick pan. just that it seemed that a good "French omelete pan" might be fun to use and has features that may allow for making omeletes easier and better.

shel

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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I'm ecstatic with a steel (not stainless) pan I got from amazon for about $35. Seasoned properly, it is way slicker and more non-stick than teflon, and takes less upkeep and more abuse.

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this is all fine and dandy until your child sets about burning a veggie burger in your omelett pan

no browning here please

t

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Is there a reason not to use a good non-stick pan?  I just got a new one as an early Christmas gift (Dupont Autograph) and it made a perfect omelet this morning--no browning, still custardy in the middle, just delicious.  This pan isn't even an omelet-style pan; it's got sloped sides and no definition between the bottom and sides.  Why would I want to use stainless instead of this?

I don't use nonstick anymore because the coating either needs to be babied or it doesn't last. Maybe others have more luck with it, but I don't feel good about using it. So I just use nice stainless pans even for delicate things like omelets and fish.

I use an non-stick, slope-sided Analon Titanium pan that works perfectly and doesn't need to be babied (dishwasher safe and OK to 500F in the oven).

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

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I'm ecstatic with a steel (not stainless) pan I got from amazon for about $35.  Seasoned properly, it is way slicker and more non-stick than teflon, and takes less upkeep and more abuse.

well, i'm sure it's more nonstick than a worn out teflon pan (like any pan that's seen year or so of real use), but not a new one. the nice thing with carbon steel is that the seasoning can be renewed easily and they last basically forever.

i'm sure the idea of a dedicated omelette pan comes from seasoned iron retaining strong flavors and odors. before teflon came along, moste omelette pans and poelles were made of seasoned carbon steel; you didn't want to cook todays eggs with the pan that cooked last night's bluefish.

Notes from the underbelly

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[

well, i'm sure it's more nonstick than a worn out teflon pan (like any pan that's seen year or so of real use), but not a new one. the nice thing with carbon steel is that the seasoning can be renewed easily and they last basically forever.

Actually the carbon steel is amazingly slippery. One can slide an omelet around on the thinnest film of oil. I've never had a teflon pan as slick as this surface.

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Actually the carbon steel is amazingly slippery.  One can slide an omelet around on the thinnest film of oil.  I've never had a teflon pan as slick as this surface.

That's curious. I've had a number of carbon steel and cast iron pans, all well seasoned. I love them ... in many ways more than non-stick pans (which bug me, because of their disposable nature). But the non-stick pans have always been way more slippery, at least before they started getting destroyed.

Notes from the underbelly

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I'm with Paul on this one. I have to say that all the reports I've heard as to the "nonstick-ness" of various non-PTFE surfaces are greatly exaggerated. Now, in certain circumstances, most any properly clean and cared-for surface can have nonstick-like properties. My French steel crêpe pan, for example, can have batter sliding all over the place when it's at the right temperature. But, "the right temperature" is pretty hot, and there is definitely browning (luckily, this is desired for crêpes). My French steel omelet pan, while sufficiently nonstick-like, is nowhere near as nonstick as my PTFE-coated thick aluminum pan of approximately the same size. For one, you have to be much more careful as to temperature with the French steel pan, and it's extremely tricky to make an omelet with no browning. It is possible to "slide an omelet" around in a French steel pan, but it's nowhere near as easy or as slippery as a PTFE-coated pan.

As to the OP's original question: Why not get a dedicated French steel omelet pan? The beauty of carbon steel is that it's cheap, so it's no big deal to get specialty and "dedicated" pans in carbon steel.

--

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As to the OP's original question:  Why not get a dedicated French steel omelet pan?  The beauty of carbon steel is that it's cheap, so it's no big deal to get specialty and "dedicated" pans in carbon steel.

Well, I did say that's what I was interested in getting. I've checked a few on line sources and will take a look at the offerings in some local stores, and go from there.

Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've cooked eggs in restaurants and learned to have a NON Stick EGGS ONLY pan. Mine is I think a Foley and is cast Aluminum and has a beefy wood handle. Not expensive. Roomates are NOT allowed to touch it. Ever. Thus....after about 7 years---it's still very no stick and I can wrist flip 3 over-easys or an omelet no problem.

If housemates/family are scraping it up with forks and spats and someone cooks a buger or bacon at too high heat--the pan is no longer a proper egg pan.

Not non stick? That's just masochistic. Spend the damn $8,get a Pure Eggs only pan and HIDE it so nobody else messes it up.

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Actually the carbon steel is amazingly slippery.  One can slide an omelet around on the thinnest film of oil.  I've never had a teflon pan as slick as this surface.

That's curious. I've had a number of carbon steel and cast iron pans, all well seasoned. I love them ... in many ways more than non-stick pans (which bug me, because of their disposable nature). But the non-stick pans have always been way more slippery, at least before they started getting destroyed.

I have a variety of cast Iron all purpose pans,and an all purpose teflon type 10",but my 8" EGG PAN (Silverstone) is only used by me and ONLY for eggs. I'd expect such a pan at $8-15 lasts 5-10 years if used ONLY in that fashion. And it works PERFECT.....ALWAYS.

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RW: I'm thinking about wrist flipping 3 eggs. Is that all at once? Not bad...

However, I think you'd be able to do that on metal too.

I'm sure that the $8 was never really part of the consideration.

Every time I buy something for my kitchen I need to consider where it will get stored.

That's why versatility becomes an important factor for me.

Also using teflon and sundry other plastics to cook in goes against my grain. I'm still holding out on using those silicone baking molds. If there is a simpler traditional material that does the job as well I would opt for that even if I had to pay 10 or 20 times that amount.

On the other hand, the calphalon pan I use for omelets wasn't expensive but I love its feel. It's the last one I'll ever have to buy. After reading some of the posts on this thread I tried to make French style omelettes for a few days. Maybe I wasn't completely successful, but the egginess and fluff wasn't my cup of tea. I prefer boldly stuffed American style omelets, good cheese(s), lots of vegetables and herbs, etc.

The question in my mind is whether I could taste yesterday's burger in my omelet. I don't think I can. So no dedicated omelet pan for me.

But to Shel_B I would say: Having a thing of beauty for something that you love is worth it so get a high-end omelette pan, avoid plastics, and learn to use it with panache. That's what I would do.

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  • 8 months later...
But to Shel_B I would say: Having a thing of beauty for something that you love is worth it so get a high-end omelette pan, avoid plastics, and learn to use it with panache. That's what I would do.

Well, that's what I did ... just need some more panache.

I love buttery eggs, so since I make the eggs with lots of butter, there doesn't seem to be much purpose to a non-stick pan.

 ... Shel


 

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But to Shel_B I would say: Having a thing of beauty for something that you love is worth it so get a high-end omelette pan, avoid plastics, and learn to use it with panache. That's what I would do.

Well, that's what I did ... just need some more panache.

I love buttery eggs, so since I make the eggs with lots of butter, there doesn't seem to be much purpose to a non-stick pan.

It's been a while since I've posted on eGullet. I've been so busy that I've fallen back on cooking and eating mostly simple comfort food. To me that's just stuff like...hamburgers, steak, chicken soup, tex-mex, fish meuniere style, salmon on the grill, lots of salad and good coffee and cheap red wine.

So the omelets I've made are simple and not classic and not too buttery.

I'm thrilled that you followed my advice. What did you end up buying?

Years back I bought a Vita-Mix blender since I was tired of blenders that didn't do things right. It cost close to $500 with the extra (dry) container and I thought I was nuts at the time. But the expense has long ceased to bother and I just love having a blender in the background that will just do things right.

Hope your dedicated omelet pan gives you great satisfaction.

Carsanco:)

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It's been a while since I've posted on eGullet. I've been so busy that I've fallen back on cooking and eating mostly simple comfort food. To me that's just stuff like...hamburgers, steak, chicken soup, tex-mex, fish meuniere style, salmon on the grill, lots of salad and good coffee and cheap red wine.

So the omelets I've made are simple and not classic and not too buttery.

I'm thrilled that you followed my advice. What did you end up buying?

Matfer Bourgeat - Click to see it - less expensive than a half way decent non-stick pan, too ...

It's heavy, but every time I make some eggs, I get so much pleasure - lots of great butter (sometimes French, sometimes local, always outstanding quality), wonderfully fresh eggs from locally raised, pasteured chickens, and the subtle joy of knowing that (for me) this is what eggs are all about.

Years back I bought a Vita-Mix blender since I was tired of blenders that didn't do things right. It cost close to $500 with the extra (dry) container and I thought I was nuts at the time. But the expense has long ceased to bother and I just love having a blender in the background that will just do things right.

It's always a joy to have something that works to your satisfaction, giving great reults and great pleasure. I bet every time you flip the switch to "on" you get a little jolt of joy.

Hope your dedicated omelet pan gives you great satisfaction.

It does, it does, it does ... I am transported back to the French countryside in the early 20th century ... :wub:

Edited by Shel_B (log)
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 ... Shel


 

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  • 5 years later...

I came late to this thread. About a year ago I decided to watch the clip below of Julia Child making omelets. I was both surprised and happy to realize that the pan she is using is the same model pan I own. Mine is not dedicated just for eggs.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RThnq3-d6PY&feature=kp

 

The only difference from how she presents the finished omelet is that I prefer my eggs slightly more set with a hint of brown.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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