Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

New Orleans Restaurants: Reviews & Recommendations


chezcherie
 Share

Recommended Posts

A bit touristy, but was always a safe bet for recommendations is The Gumbo Shop. They have all the dishes you'd expect to find in NOLA. Prices have always been reasonable, though I have been away from there for a few years, and it's just down the street from the St. Louis Cathedral. Very convenient if transportation is limited.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At Cochon the combo that looked good to me as a solo diner was marinated brussel sprouts, hot boudin, and the duck pastrami slider. Can anyone comment on those items?

I think you're looking at Cochon Butcher, which is very, very good, but personally, I would recommend Cochon over it. Butcher is a sandwich and small plates kind of place-- we go there for lunch a lot. Cochon is a sit-down restaurant. If you do choose Butcher, though, those sound like good choices; my girlfriend loves the brisket sliders, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At Cochon the combo that looked good to me as a solo diner was marinated brussel sprouts, hot boudin, and the duck pastrami slider. Can anyone comment on those items?

I think you're looking at Cochon Butcher, which is very, very good, but personally, I would recommend Cochon over it. Butcher is a sandwich and small plates kind of place-- we go there for lunch a lot. Cochon is a sit-down restaurant. If you do choose Butcher, though, those sound like good choices; my girlfriend loves the brisket sliders, too.

yes, do know that Cochon Butcher is wholly separate from Cochon proper. It's connected, but the two have different menus & focus. Butcher is a casual, sandwiches & small places spot, good for a quick bite, with stools & counter seating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks all for the clarifications on Cochon versus Butcher. I went back and read some older topics here with many references and pictures of both as well as some of the other places suggested. I am going to take some time tomorrow to sort it all out and come up with a flexible plan. I am SO looking forward to this adventure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have all the suggestions with menu ideas in my notebook and have decided not to be too rigid. I will see where I am when hungry and work off the list as well as asking for suggestions when there.

I must say that Cochon versus The Butcher is sounding awfully tempting. Any thoughts on a solo diner, especially one that either does not order alot and possibly does not finish everything? I love to sample, but get bogged down with quantity and will not be in a situation for taking leftovers. I hate to insult the kitchen. Also, can you give me an idea of the "dress code"?

Thank you all for your help. I will report back.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think being solo will be a problem at all at Cochon. They have both a typical bar and a bar with a kitchen view that you could sit at. Plus, Cochon's small plates are pretty conducive to mixing and matching to suit your appetite, and they get tourists by the boatload, so I'm sure they'll understand you not being able to take home leftovers. And the dress code is more or less whatever you feel like. People frequently wear shorts and aren't out of place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dining at Cochon solo would be no problem at all, as Mike said, there are two bars, and I'd actually say the kitchen bar is the best spot for anyone into food anyway, solo or not. Obviously bars are not great for larger groups, but in you're alone, or just with one or two companions, it's fun to watch the chefs, and you might be able to get in a conversation with them, depending on how crazed things are, who's working, etc. If you order interesting things, they might notice, and you could get some special attention, especially if they notice that you're on your own.

That said, the place is packed to the rafters much of the time these days, so it's possible that the staff is not going to have time for any of that. You'll certainly have a better chance on a slower day.

I've gone to both Cochon and Butcher within a few days of each other. They're different enough experiences that it's not like you need to pick between them. If you have time, do both. If you had to pick one, I'd choose the main restaurant.

And as mentioned above, despite being right in a major tourist area, Johhny's Po Boys are pretty righteous. If you don't want to leave the quarter, you could do worse...

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know how I missed mention of it earlier or forgot it myself, but let me also recommend Johnny's in the Quarter. I'm glad to see it's still getting good reviews. I worked in the Quarter about 30 years ago and would pass by Johnny's while I walked from my bus stop. I would grab breakfast, usually biscuit sandwiches, for the office once or twice a week. We'd also go there for lunch about once a week. Johnny was always so warm and welcoming and the food was fantastic.

What a great memory. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After arriving this afternoon I walked over to Coop's as it was the closest place among the recs. Then I made a mistake - I was so starved having gotten up almost 12 hours before to get to the airport and refusing to eat crud food en route - I was really hungry. I know better than to order a sampler platter.....However- there were some good things. First they brought out a little bowl of seafood gumbo that was green and earthy tasting. The broth was excellent. I would have enjoyed a bowl of mostly broth with the bits of seafood (one plump shrimp and oyster each and a little crab claw) along with just a touch of rice. Unfortunately it was loaded with rice and green pepper/celery so I fished out the seafood and slurped up the broth.

There was a forgettable chicken wing billed as "fried chicken" that was flavorful and the meat pulled off the bone, but is pretty much the rule with these combos - was reheated.

The shrimp creole had a few nice shrimp but tasted mostly of tomato.

The rabbit and sausage jambalaya suffered the most from the "sampler" concept - reheated and sort of stuck together. The flavors were decent. I picked out the sausage that was quite nice and made little bites with the soft roll they served when I sat down. It made me reconsider my mental aversion to a sausage po' boy.

This was all redeemed by the red beans & rice: huge plump beans that had retained their integrity but were creamy with no tough skin. The deal closer was the pork shoulder they cooked them with. Almost half the serving consisted of flavorful porky shreds. I would go back for a bowl of that goodness.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heidi, hopefully this isn't too late for you to find some utility. The current issue of Saveur (#142 in their annoying system) has an article about smaller restaurants in NOLA. The featured restaurant, Dominique's, sounds right up your alley. Here's the link to the on-line article Saveur Linkie. Pay attention too, the sidebar with the clickable "New and Notable Restaurants In New Orleans". Look off to the right of the main link, you should find it.

Unfortunately, I'm about a month behind in my food magazine readings, otherwise I'd have sent this to you before you left !

Those RB&R sounded wonderful. Have a beignet & chicory coffee for me, and maybe a Sazarac !

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FYI, Dominique's chef when that article was written, Dominique Macquet, left the restaurant, and it recently reopened under a different name. I'd avoid it because of the transition. Maybe it's great, but I haven't heard anything yet.

Edited by MikeHartnett (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

FYI, Dominique's chef when that article was written, Dominique Macquet, left the restaurant, and it recently reopened under a different name. I'd avoid it because of the transition. Maybe it's great, but I haven't heard anything yet.

Bummer that. Wonder what happened? The chef sounded like a really cool guy, and committed to the project. Guess you really can't trust anything anymore.....

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many many thanks to those who urged me to go for Cochon versus just dropping into The Butcher.

Had lunch there today - the rabbit livers (I am stealing the concept of the mint/parsley/pepper jelly/pickled onion "garnish"), the pork cheek on a potato/sauerkraut cake (more like lovely mashed with a hint of the kraut) with elevating sauces, and the smothered greens (tender, slightly bitter, accented with bits of pork) - the latter improved by the house made hot pepper vinegar.

The lovely couple next to me ordered the boudin balls - they had been waffling between that and the pork cheek so we shared tastes. The boudin was really flavorful and enhanced by the pepper jelly still on my plate. The gentleman also gave me a taste of his roasted redfish - a lovely clean simple bite sparked up by the pickled onion on the side. Completely underlined the downside of dining alone - sharing is so much more enjoyable.

As to atmosphere - it is very low key. Service was down to earth. The tables are nicely spaced- luckily the two tops are close enough to share food but not touch elbows :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

My sister is going to NO on 16 M.

she has been there before as has my father. Not Me. ( :sad: )

she will be staying at the Intercontinental on Charles st.

there is "Felix" and "Acme" that might be 'oyster houses"

there might be "Ralph" and "Kazoo" for gumbo.

I use the "..." as my sister well sometimes forgets some details.

Granted the N.O. is a sort of Food Capital

what might Seasoned Vets suggest: really good, not so touristy, and afordable?

So Many Thanks in advance.

maybe she can take some TransPort to a better Place?

she likes fish. she like a little atmosphere mostly What On The Plate

she is now living near Austin TX so that's what she can get locally.

serious thanks again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess everybody is still asleep after mardi-gras in NO.

update from my sister:

"I can take transport or cab easily

I am looking for GREAT GUMBO ! ! !

So, Gumbo, good CREOLE FOOD and FISH ! and oysters

Thanks"

:laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know there are a lot of NOLA threads. Have you searched for them, or looked in the Louisiana forum?

I liked Felix's jambalaya, but the locals have other preferences posted on the board.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Unless we move to New Orleans, we'll never be able to visit all the restaurants that look great. We're going to be in New Orleans for five days, two during the French Quarter Festival. Thanks to your comments, we've tentatively planned our meals. Some of these places are higher end than we'd normally choose, so comparable food for less money would be helpful.

We'd be very grateful for your comments.

breakfast: Cafe du Monde, The Coffee Pot

lunches: Dooky Chase (or Bon Ton Cafe), Bayona, Mahoneys (or Tracey's or Mother's), Acme (or Casamento or Franky and Johnny's)

dinners: Brigsten's, Marigny Brasserie, Cochon, Herbsaint

Thanks for your improvements!

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

August is a must. John Besh's first, I think. Its great, serious NO-inflected food and pretty reasonably priced, esp at lunch when it is downright cheap. It is located behind the Windsor Court hotel near the casino.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

If you are still there, the Irish house has good upscale pub food...Anya was playing there this last weekend. Chicken curry is really good.

I just have to go to Camillia Grill at some point, but couldn't get in the door this weekend, and muffalottas were out as well for the same reason from central grocery. If I had been there for the French Quarter fest I would have been on foot, but I just wanted to grab it to go.

If you are still there, things have surely calmed down and getting in won't be an issue.

It's a wonderful time to be there, Sunday was soo beautiful to cruise down magazine and St. Charles. Hope you enjoyed the stay....perfect timing. Next week will be New Orleans crazy time...I like Jazz Fest better than Mardi GRAS!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many thanks for all the good ideas . . . in this topic and others. We had a wonderful trip during the French Quarter Festival . . . visiting the Quarter, taking the ferry to Algiers Point, walking the Botanical Gardens, swinging at the clubs on Frenchmen Street and much more. Eating, as it often is for us, was the highlight . . . and here are those highlights. We owe a big shout out to Corbin Evans, now Executive Chef at the Inn at Ole Miss, formerly Chef at Lulu's in NOLA, for his suggestions.

Dooky Chase

2301 Orleans Ave

504-821-0600

Gumbo, fried chicken, rice and beans with sausage.

Brigsten's

723 Dante St

504-861-7610

shrimp remoulade, seafood platter, soft-shell crab (maybe the best dish of our trip), pecan pie with caramel sauce (second-best dish)

Cafe du Monde

800 Decatur Street

504-525-4544

The beignets and chicory coffee are a tradition, but not as good as we remembered. Notable for the waitress from Vietnam who promised us either monkey brains or monkey bottom if we'd come back the next day.

Bayona

430 Dauphine St

504-525-4455

Greek salad, sea scallops with bacon and leek puree

Marigny Brasserie

640 Frenchmen Street

504-945-4472

Crispy goat cheese cake with strawberry sauce, crab cake, BBQ shrimp with cheese grits and slow-cooked andouille collards,

Mahoneys Po'boys

3454 Magazine St.

504-899-3374

fried green tomatoes, the Peacemaker (fried oysters, bacon, cheddar cheese, dressed), fried oyster, soft-shell crab

Cochon Our favorite restaurant

930 Tchoupitoulas Street

504-588-2123

grilled drum fish, duck, chocolate pecan tart, lemon pie

Franky and Johnny's

321 Arabella Street

(504) 899-9146

boiled crawfish!, grilled shrimp

Edited by Tom (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...