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Prime Rib


Bella S.F.
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I did a little 2 rib roast last night for a quick after-work dinner with a dear friend. There were 3 of us and we had no leftovers. I'd never done one this small.

It was the $5.99 sale model roast from Albertson's, but it did have a good fat cap.

The meat was at room-temp, oiled, salted and peppered when I put it in a shallow pan, surrounded by potatoes and carrots. It went into a pre-heated convection oven at 450F for a little over 5 minutes, then I turned the temp down to 350F for about 40 minutes. I pulled it at 118F, tossed the veg into another pan and put them back in the oven to finish roasting while the beef rested. Made jus from some great beef stock I had in the freezer (reduced, then strained to get rid of the potato bits scraped up from the roasting pan).

I was glad I'd decided to roast the veg in the same pan, because the roast was lopsided and I propped it up with the potatoes.

It was very good! It had a nice crust and was perfectly medium rare.

(Served with some lightly steamed green beans sauteed in bacon fat, then combined with feta and toasted pecans. I thought I had a gracious plenty beans to make for some leftovers, but every bite was consumed. They were SO good!)

I just wish I'd had time to make some of Marlene's Yorkies to go with!!!

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I think I've only made one 'prime rib' and that was last year at Christmas. I bought the meat from Costco and did the refrigerator dry-aging thing for a few days before actually cooking. To be honest, I can't remember which method I used. I do know that I followed the temperature guide that seems to be pretty consistent in both of these threads for removing the roast from the oven (120F+/-), and I let the meat rest for at least 20 minutes before slicing. I thought it was pretty darned good. I don't think you can fail using either of these 'proven methods'. As many have also said, as long as you have a nice piece of meat that is well marbled with a nice fat cap, you should be good to go.

I have another Costco 'prime rib' in the fridge right now. It is dry aging for Christmas dinner.

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Alton Brown's method of refrigerator drying:

Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Place the standing rib roast upright onto a half sheet pan fitted with a rack. The rack is essential for drainage. Place dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F. You can measure both with a refrigerator thermometer. Change the towels daily for 3 days.

From: http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/re...6_17372,00.html

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hongda,

Thanks for the link to the Alton Brown recipe. What I don't understand is why you would want to draw moisture away from the meat. ( the placement of the paper towels) Perhaps I am having a total mind fade (I originally wrote "wine fade" instead of "mind fade". Hmmm. Last night's glass of wine cannot be messing me up now.) Where is my thinking wrong?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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The general consensus I believe is that you are concentrating the flavors of the meat and also allowing the enzymes to tenderize the meat (which is true of venison as well) The amount of water loss is surprising, but doesn't affect the juiciness of the final product significantly.

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My favorite method is still to rub the room-temperature roast with oil, salt and seasonings, sear it in a preheated 450 degree oven for for 20 minutes, and then turn down the oven to 325 degrees for and continue roasting 15 minutes or so per pound. I have a thermometer stuck right in the middle of the roast to monitor temperature. I generally pull the roast out at 120 degrees and let it sit for about 20-30 minutes before slicing. This gives me a nice crusty exterior and juicy pink interior in the middle. Lovely.

PS: edited to add: the others in the house generally like their meat more well done than I. Because of this, I have found that pulling the roast at 120 degrees will give a more well-done end, that they like, and a still acceptably rare middle for me. If I was roasting just for myself, I would probably pull the roast at 110 to 115 degrees.

Edited by MGLloyd (log)

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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Geez, I thought we went through this before!

Anyway, as mentioned USDA Prime is the first requirement and dry aged if possible.

Cannot be done correctly with at least greater than 1/2 a full rib primal.

Object is to transfer heat into roast so it slowly makes it way into interior and results in an even temperature distribution through as much of the rib as possible.

For the non-technical, heat transfer requires a heat gradient to work so obviously the outside will be cooked more than the interior. How to accomplish is endless number of way but why not do it the simpilest?

Start at 450F or so to get a nice crust, after crust(about 45 min) turn down to 350F until interior gets to 100f to 105F. Remove from oven, tent with foil and rest for at least 45 min. guaranteed perfect, simple whatever.

Pepin has a nice seasoning that includes paprika, tyme, salt and pepper that enhances the browning.

Goof luck.-Dick

What would be the rested temp here? Are you saying to do atleast a 4 bone roast?

Resting temp is room temp foil tented. Cannot be done with a least half a rib roast or at least 4 ribs if from the large end.

You need an accurate meat thermometer because all ovens cook differently.

MGLloyd is right on except I go to 100F interior and for a full rib roast, minimum of at least an hour for rare. You can keep the thermometer stuck into the roast and monitor as you wait.

Edited by budrichard (log)
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Haven't seen much said about what to roast the prime rib in. I was thinking that a regular roasting pan, which has high sides, might not be what I want. If I use a low sided pan, wouldn't that help the browning/carmelizing along?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Haven't seen much said about what to roast the prime rib in. I was thinking that a regular roasting pan, which has high sides, might not be what I want. If I use a low sided pan, wouldn't that help the browning/carmelizing along?

I use the bottom part of my broiler pan... very, very shallow.

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Haven't seen much said about what to roast the prime rib in. I was thinking that a regular roasting pan, which has high sides, might not be what I want. If I use a low sided pan, wouldn't that help the browning/carmelizing along?

I use the bottom part of my broiler pan... very, very shallow.

I use a big cast iron skillet!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The Clairborne recipe has worked for me twice, both outstanding roasts usually 4-6 bone, Costco one year and last year a Hearst Ranch piece of meat. If an oven can reach 500 degrees it has to be well insulated, and being well insulated, will maintain the decreasing temp very well. The key is keeping the door closed. Whatever the method here's hoping it turns out well. Happy Holidays.

Well, I have been reading over everyone's responses and now I am a bit more confused than before. It seems that there are strong opinions from all camps.

 

  alanamoana, thank you for finding the link to the other thread about cooking prime rib. I have not had a chance to read through that one yet, but it is on the top of the list of things to look at after I get through with the "things that must get done " list.

  I had mentioned that we spent far too much money last year buying a top-notch 3 rib roast from a butcher where we were given horrible instructions on how to cook it. I never kept the directions we were given because they were dreadful. All I remember was that we started the roast in a VERY HOT oven. I cannot remember anything else, except for the fact that if we had kept the roast in for the whole time the butcher had told us to, we would have anded up with a lump of coal.

  Raoul, I am not familiar with the Craig Claiborne method. It sounds like you just have to go on blind faith that the roast will continue to cook in an oven that will definitely cool down pretty quickly.

  I am leaning toward searing the outside in a pan (cast iron??) and then putting it on a rack in the oven. I have been told to salt and not to salt. I know people who swear that the meat will be tough if you salt it ahead of time. I do not think that I have found that to be true.

  One more question. This may get me stoned, but , has anyone ever bought a rib roast from Costco? I remember reading somewhere that Julia Child loved the meat at Costco. I was there this morning and completely forgot to ask about the grade of the rib roasts. Someone also told me that Safeway has a new "Rancher's Cut", I think it is called. Then there is always "Whole Paycheck". 

  Looks like I better make a decision.

"I drink to make other people interesting".

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I have only used the Claiborne high temperature method and purchased a really nice looking choice roast at Costco, for the first time, which I am dry aging in the fridge (tisk tisk). The meat comes out incredibly crusty and juicy but do not open the oven!

Here is a website for the recipe. http://foodmaven.com/diary/archives/00000179.html

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I think the allure of Prime Rib is that something so primal, so basic, so simple to roast, is yet so delicious. For me, probably one of the holy grails of cookery is a thick slab of prime rib for a holiday dinner.

One should really save up your pocket of pence to purchase a real 'Prime' Rib Roast. I am lucky to have a local butcher, Egger's Meats on the South Hill in Spokane, who always has prime grade available fresh. And take a close look at the price, yes, $14.99 a pound for prime grade. Don't believe me? Then look at the marbling in the next photos, it is prime of course. Choice grade for the holidays is not something we consider.

You may remember that I wrote about the subject of "Supermarket Steaks vs. Ye Olde Butcher Shoppe" in the cookking forum earlier this year. The prime grade ribeye steak from Egger's Meats was the clear winner in the taste/cooking test I posted. And so it was proven again with my Prime Rib Roast:

gallery_41580_4407_191451.jpg

I was very close to purchasing a prime grade roast through one of the top mail order butchers. But I was dismayed at the price: $29.99 per pound, without shipping, for a prime grade roast from Lobel's. Secondly, I like to ask my butcher to personally cut the roast for me and that of course isn't an option with Lobel's. I doubt a butcher would take specific instructions, successfully, over the phone. I had the pleasure of watching a scene from the past-my butcher hauled out a whole prime rib and cut it to my specs right there on a big wooden slab-including my request for an extra thick layer of fat. And here is the beauty of the Washington State cattle industry in all of its glory:

gallery_41580_4407_222851.jpg

gallery_41580_4407_125774.jpg

I roasted the beef in a 450 oven for 15 minutes, then turned the heat down to 325 and roasted to an internal temperature of 124. I let the roast sit for about 10 minutes. A bit more on the rare side for my tastes, but with this grade of quality beef, I could have eaten the beast raw and been satisfied. I'll adjust the cooking time and temperature a bit in the future.

I had been drooling over Marlene's gravy photos in the "Dinner" forum, and then I saw chef Anne Willan cooking a rib roast with Martha Stewart on television. Ms. Willan said that in her home county in England they served the "Sunday Roast" with gravy, never jus. So after I pulled the roast from the oven I set in making a good gravy with more fat than my Mother would ever have allowed, along with a good douse of Maker's Mark Brandy.

And here we are-"Prime Rib," Roasted Potatoes, Horseradish, Bourbon Gravy:

gallery_41580_4407_149777.jpg

By the way, the tasty shards I cut off the end of the roast and ate before bed were even better than the beef on the plate!

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David Ross would you post a photo of the whole rib roasted please? I know you would taken a of photo it! For me that it the "hallelujah!!" moment - when you take it out of the oven... thanks.

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David Ross would you post a photo of the whole rib roasted please?  I know you would taken a of photo it!  For me that it the "hallelujah!!" moment - when you take it out of the oven... thanks.

You know me to well. Yes indeed, I did take a photo of the roasted beef-albeit a bit of a fuzzy photo-probably because I was shaking too much in anticipation of eating this giant. And I agree with you, that is the "Halleujah, Amen, God Have Mercy" moment-the smell of roasted beef filling the kitchen. Someone please get me a handkerchief to wipe away the tears.

gallery_41580_4407_126709.jpg

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That roast is a thing of beauty!  And from a fellow Washingtonian!

Thank you. I may have to trek out to Egger's Meats and buy another one for New Year's dinner. I think the beef gods gave me a Christmas gift-a prime rib roast for merely $14.99 a pound. Thank you Santa Claus.

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It depends on how much leftovers you want.  A two rib will yield some but not a lot. I rarely roast anything smaller than a three rib for even just the two of us.  That yields decent leftovers.

I brush my roast with olive oil and salt and pepper it.  I use a 300 degree convection oven, 325 if you don't have convection. 

I pull it at 118 and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.  That will yield a reasonably rare, but not raw roast.  If you want it a little more well done, pull it at 122 and don't let it sit for more than 10 minutes. 

If you are making yorkies and you only have one oven and you want the roast med rare, pull it at 118 because it's going to rest for at least 20-25 minutes while the oven temp comes up for the yorkies and then they bake.

That's it, that's all I ever do.  Lots of people will tell you roast it low and slow.  I can't say I've ever noticed a lot of difference when I've done it that way. :smile:

Thanks Marlene - I used this method last night and it came out perfect.

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Well, I started this whole thing, read and reread all of the wonderful recommendtaions, and finally made my choice. Season, sear, and then low and slow to a beautifully medium rare doneness. I also had also chosen wonderful dishes planned to go with it and could not wait to start cooking. I was also looking forward to being able to post the results of the fruits of my labors. My Christmas dinner ended up being 3 bags of I.V. fluids in the E.R. Not exactly what I had planned and extremely upsetting. Since cooking and eating have not really been happening, our beautiful 3 rib (I did listen to people's advice about only 2 ribs) roast has been vacuum packed and is sitting in our freezer till we will be able to have a proper Christmas dinner.

This is the first time in days that I have been able to be semi-vertical. I thought. perhaps, since I had started this thread that some might think it odd that I never posted a result. I didn't want anyone to think that I just asked questions but did not follow up on anything. Stay tuned. You will be hearing about an exciting Christmas dinner, hopefully, sometime in January. Gee, does that mean that Santa will come back again?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Didn't even get the chance to eat much of anything to get food poisoning. That made me smile when I saw it. Imagine me planning so hard and so long and then making myself sick. Nay. Was nursing a cold. It didn't get better. My asthma kicked in. After a while I couldn't use my inhalers because I could not breathe well enough to be able to suck the inhaler in. I am pretty stubborn and always say that I will be fine in just a little while.

I couldn't wake up. My husband stopped believing me say that I was alright. By then I couldn't breathe or stop spasms of coughing, on top of, of course, I found out later infected ears, nose, etc. So off to the E.R.

Breathing is really under-appreciated.

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Didn't even get the chance to eat much of anything to get food poisoning. That made me smile when I saw it. Imagine me planning so hard and so long and then making myself sick. Nay. Was nursing a cold. It didn't get better. My asthma kicked in. After a while I couldn't use my inhalers because I could not breathe well enough to be able to suck the inhaler in.  I am pretty stubborn and always say  that I will be fine in just a little while.

  I couldn't wake up. My husband stopped believing me say that I was alright. By then I couldn't breathe or stop spasms of coughing, on top of, of course, I found out later infected ears, nose, etc. So off to the E.R.

  Breathing is really under-appreciated.

Feel better, sweetie!

Holly, it depends. Are you going to par-boil them, and if so, to what stage of doneness?

Edited by christine007 (log)

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