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Mostarda di Cremona recipe


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I've been committing the ultimate faux pas by serving up bollito misto without any mostarda di frutta and I want to rectify that.

However, I have a few issues. First, I can't find mostarda anywhere so I'd like to make it. Does anyone have any good recipes for it?

Also, what actually is the difference, if any, between mostard di frutta and mostarda di cremona frutta?

Many thanks

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FWIW, there is a recipe from Mario Batali on the FoodTV website. I've made it several times and think its pretty good.

You should also get a posting from Divina from Florence, since she has a recipe thats manufactured in Italy.

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i'm not sure what the situation is in the uk, but in the us, we can buy it occasionally (especially online at italian specialty places like ferrari). i've tried making it. the cooking isn't so difficult but finding mustard oil is. it's an incredibly piercing oil that in italy is sold in pharmacies. i've never seen it sold in the us. some recipes call for mustard seed, but i don't think that would give the same result.

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i'm not sure what the situation is in the uk, but in the us, we can buy it occasionally (especially online at italian specialty places like ferrari). i've tried making it. the cooking isn't so difficult but finding mustard oil is. it's an incredibly piercing oil that in italy is sold in pharmacies. i've never seen it sold in the us. some recipes call for mustard seed, but i don't think that would give the same result.

you can get mustard oil in indian groceries. I would think it's the same thing? (Piercing but mellow and nutty once cooked.)

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My mostarda is not traditional Italian recipe.....

For the Italian one you do need Mustard Essence, which I was told was against the law in america( although available at indian stores as mentioned above) I think it says it is not for consumption..

The traditional mostarda, is candied fruits with a spicy sugar syrup, I would think impossible to make at home.

But most families, make more of a sort of applesauce version, cooking fruit and then adding 10 drops of mustard essence per kilo o fruit.

I like mine spicier!

In Florence you can buy the essence at Bizzari, listed ion my guide online.

as well as truffle essence and porcini too!

I am sure it is easy to get the Mostarda online!

Cremona is the city.... ( stradavarius) where the whole fruit mostarda is famous.

Edited by divina (log)
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Sorry but my non traditional recipe is being produced by DArio Cecchini, I worked for him and he has the rights to my recipe.

The applesauce version, I can get for you, may be quince, and with the mostarda essence added at the end.

will get back to you!

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yes, that is my jelly.. first called Judy's Jelly, then Cotognata Cecchini and now Mostarda meditteranea..

I created it when I worked with DArio years ago.. I am returning to collaborate with Dario on a new project soon!

I can buy mostarda so don;t make it. but here is a classic recipe.

2 kg fruit ( apricots, whole or cut in half, pitted: peaches halved and pitted. pears halved, mandarin oranges, pineapple, figs.)

1 kg fruit

mustard essence( I buy it in the farmacy here or at Bizzari in FLorence, laddress on my site)

Wash the fruit and let dry.

LAyer the fruit with sugar in a stainless steel pot or bowl and let sit 24 hours.

Over medium heat, bring to a boil and let cook for 5 minutes. turn off and let sit over night.

Repeat for a total of three times.

Add at least 6 drops of essence ( I like 10)

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  • 1 month later...

I'm looking for a recipe for mostarda di Cremona, as we would like to have a go at making them, rather than giving in and buying.

Can anyone help??

Many Thanks

Erica

Host note: this message and the following were originally on a separate thread and have been merged into the older one for the sake of keeping information on mostarda in one thread

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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I'm looking for a recipe for mostarda di Cremona, as we would like to have a go at making them, rather than giving in and buying.

Can anyone help??

Many Thanks

Erica

We had a discussion about that just a short while back.

Look here.

Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.
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Hi Erica

In addition to mostarda di frutta di Cremona, which with its pieces of candied fruit in a clear, mustardy syrup is, of course, de rigueur with bollito misto, zampone and other such traditional dishes, you could try making the less well known mostarda di frutta from Mantova. This version, I recall, is made primarily from apples stewed down in a mustard syrup (I would guess you could use powdered mustard if mustard oil or essence is not available) flavoured with spices such as nutmeg. I remember it sold not in manufactured jars but from big tubs, to scoop out into smaller tubs, purchased from the Alimentari. This apple mustard is used in the filling for the Mantovan speciality tortelli di zucca, pumpkin filled tortelli, that is so delicious especially at this time of year. It would be excellent, too, I'm sure, with grilled Gloucester Old Spot! And I think it might be easier to have a pop at recreating than the candied version from Cremona.

MP

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We are glutens for punishment, and have been able to find mustard essence so are going to give it a go with divina' s recipe from t'other thread that I was too blind to see!! Although the tortelli de zucca sound great!

I'll keep you posted if it works, although never having tried it myself, I won't be able to say if it has an authentic taste or not! :unsure:

Lets face it, we spend three days making bread, so hopefully this wont take any longer!

Many thanks to all for ideas (even though in another thread!!)

Erica

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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MSK in Sheffield!

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
Is mustard seed oil the same as mustard oil?  And do they work in this recipe, or is the mustard essence everyone's talking about a different thing altogether?

Mostarda, with all due respect to the other previous posters, in and around Mantova/Cremona is made with senape. Most often you buy senape from an apothecary.

It is not mustard oil. It is incredibly strong. Nadia Santini, perhaps 15 years ago, had my wife and me smell a vial of senape. It nearly knocked us over. But boy was the finished product great.

Nadia makes her own as does Romano Tomani at Ambasciata in Quistello. If you email them, I'm sure they'll give you the recipe because it's not something secret. I don't have their books (in Italian) with me, but it might even be in them. Basically, the only real difference between mostardas in that area is what fruit(s) are used.

Hope tihs is helpful.

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Fortedei, now I'm a bit confused. I thought senape was just the translation of the word mustard....

Senape is to mustard as parmigiano-reggiano is to grana. They are both cheese, closely related, both very good in their own way, but with a world of difference in taste.

Senape is most often translated as mustard. In fact, it comes from the white seeds of the mustard plant. It is the way the seeds are crushed and how it is turned into what I would call, perhaps incorrectly, a "must" (no pun intended) that is used in mostarda in the Mantova/Cremona area. To my knowledge, a chemist is the one who creates the senape. The difference between an artisinal mostarda and the industrial stuff that one, more often than not , sees in Italy, is truly astounding and it has nothing to do with the fruit (or in some cases vegetables) and sugar that is used. It has mostly to do with the quality of the senape.

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I will go to my Senape dealer... and get you the Italian details on how it is made.

When I buy it here ( forgive me for simplifying!) it is called Essenza di Senape.

In FLorence I buy it at Bizarri ( listed on my site) and you should never really have anyone sniff it!!!! it is so potent.

When they work with it they hold it as far away from their noses and eyes that they can!

the word Senape does translate to mustard.. but there are many kinds of mustards, from the french styles where the seeds are first cooked in wine, then crushed and the Italian where the essence is added to whole fruits, fruit purees and sometimes a fruit and nut pureeas well as the quice paste.

I will go and do a little foto documentary and blog about it next week.

The amount of Senape varies in doses..I prefer a kick in mine!

they also sell Cotognata senepata, which is a quince paste with the senape in it too!

At the holidays they do the veggies which look like jewels!

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  • 1 month later...
I will go to my Senape dealer... and get you the Italian details on how it is made.

When I buy it here ( forgive me for simplifying!) it is called Essenza di Senape.

In FLorence I buy it at Bizarri ( listed on my site) and you should never really have anyone sniff it!!!! it is so potent.

When they work with it they hold it as far away from their noses and eyes that they can!

the word Senape does translate to mustard.. but there are many kinds of mustards, from the french styles where the seeds are first cooked in wine, then crushed and the Italian where the essence is added to whole fruits, fruit purees and sometimes a fruit and nut pureeas well as the quice paste.

The amount of Senape varies in doses..I prefer a kick in mine!

they also sell Cotognata senepata, which is a quince paste with the senape in it too!

At the holidays they do the veggies which look like jewels!

My grandmother bought a bottle of Essenza di Senape in Italy back in the early 1970s, and thirty years later it was still extremely potent... whenever I'd add the essence to a batch of mostarda, I'd go outside, put a wet rag up to my nose and add a couple of drops to the syrup. I ran out of it a few years ago, so I thought of buying some in Italy recently, but I don't think it would be appropriate to carry it back on an airplane!

Does anyone know if mustard essence is sold in the U.S.? You can find jars of mostarda di frutta here, but they seldom have enough kick, and I'd like to make my own vegetable mostarda.

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's not illegal to bring it back with you from Italy.

In Verona I bought it at a pharmacy!

here in Florence at Bizzari, one of my favorite shops, and very Bizarre!

I think the Mustard Essence gives more of a wasabi burn, not mustard.

My friend Andrea Perini in the

Central MArket is ow making Chestnuts, and mixed berries with a heavy simple syrup mostardo!

WILD

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Fortedei, now I'm a bit confused. I thought senape was just the translation of the word mustard....

Senape is to mustard as parmigiano-reggiano is to grana. They are both cheese, closely related, both very good in their own way, but with a world of difference in taste.

Senape is most often translated as mustard. In fact, it comes from the white seeds of the mustard plant.

I don't think this is correct. Senape is an Italian word that refers to exactly the same things that the english word "mustard" does. If tou ask for senape in an Italian restaurant, or in an supermarket they will bring you something pretty similar to what you would get in England or France. Made from the same types of seed. Perhaps you meant to say that your prefer Italian mustard to French mustard or English mustard.

There are a variety of different but related plants called mustard: brassica nigra, brassica hirta, brassice juncea and brassica alba.

A few moments of googling found this useful website about

mustard.

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