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19th/20th Century Cocktails


Mayur
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Hi all!

Just trying to figure out what the recipe for these two cocktails are. For some reason, I can find neither on any web databases. I'm guessing that Imbibe! has them, but I don't have my copy handy (it's on loaner).

Also, suggestions for ryes or gins (respectively) that go well in these recipes would be great. Thanks!

Mayur Subbarao, aka "Mayur"
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I had to read this several times before I figured out (or at least I think I figured it out) what drink recipes were being requested.

20th Century Cocktail:

1.5 oz Gin

.75 oz lemon

.75 oz Lillet

.5 oz White Cacao

Shake/strain/up. There's actually a good deal of flexibility in the ratios, just be sure that you are controlling the amount of cacao enough that it can only be tasted in the finish. You may want to use less than what is printed here, I often do.

As for the 19th Century Cocktail, I can't help you there, though I'm sure someone around here can.

ETA: Plymouth works well in this.

Edited by thirtyoneknots (log)

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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The 19th century cocktail is Brian Miller's creation which replaces gin with Woodford reserve bourbon, lillet blanc with lillet rouge

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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I had to read this several times before I figured out (or at least I think I figured it out) what drink recipes were being requested.
Yeah; sorry about that. I did make the thread title and request a bit confusing... serves me right for being in a hurry!

Thanks for the help, Andy and John!

Mayur Subbarao, aka "Mayur"
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20th century is traditionally a 2-1-1-1 of gin, lemon juice, lillet blanc and cacao. you'll want to tone down the cacao a bit from that. it's a great drink for the gin-phobic...my goto for them.

the 19th century is described above. I believe the 21st century is a tequila variant.

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Naming these riffs on the original 20th Century recipe , the 19th and the 21st Centuries doesn't make a lot of sense though - the original cocktail was named after the train , not the 100 yrs between 1900 and 1999.

Gethin

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Naming these riffs on the original 20th Century recipe , the 19th and the 21st Centuries doesn't make a lot of sense though  - the original cocktail was named after the train , not the 100 yrs between 1900 and 1999.

Gethin

Does it really matter? Naming a drink is excruciating, and if you're doing a "riff" on something, it seems to make a lot of sense to somehow pay homage to the original recipe -- the name being a quick and effective vessel.

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Naming these riffs on the original 20th Century recipe , the 19th and the 21st Centuries doesn't make a lot of sense though  - the original cocktail was named after the train , not the 100 yrs between 1900 and 1999.

Gethin

Does it really matter? Naming a drink is excruciating, and if you're doing a "riff" on something, it seems to make a lot of sense to somehow pay homage to the original recipe -- the name being a quick and effective vessel.

If the idea is to pay homage to the original recipe, paying homage to the original name seems to me to be part of it to and naming these riffs after other iconic trains for instance, would perhaps have been more appropriate.

But at the end of the day- no it doesn't really matter.

Gethin

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  • 2 years later...

a) I accidentally bought some dark creme de cacao when I wanted to make 20th centuries. Do I:

  • Close my eyes with I'm drinking
  • Get some white cacao (whose?) and use the dark for ice cream
  • Get some white cacao and use the dark for _____________

b) My first experiment with the 20th century adhered strictly to the classic ratio, and was MUCH too sweet. How far back do I dial the cacoa? I'm thinking of pulling back from ~1oz to ~5ml....

c) Is there a place for Bittermens' chocolate bitters in this drink?

d) Do I want to swap out the Lillet for Cocchi Americano next time? Immediately? Sooner?

Edited by Eastgate (log)
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Hi Eastgate.

a. Entirely up to you. I don't believe there's a flavor difference between the light and dark.

b. My first try was also way too sweet. I've settled on:

1 1/2 oz Gin (Brokers or Beefeaters are excellent for this)

3/4 oz Cocchi Aperitivo Americano (so this answers "d.")

3/4 oz fresh lemon juice

1/2 TEASPOON creme de cacao

Yep -- I dialed back the cacao to 1/2 teaspoon and it was just right. I'm using Bols light creme de cacao and have no idea if it's terrible or great -- it's the only one I've tasted. But the drink itself is one of my favorites. It's gin and lemon on the sip -- with a lovely fruity bitterness from the Americano -- and then a slight aftertaste of chocolate (without being sweet or overpowering).

c. Good question. I have some too, so I may be experimenting.

Have fun,

Dan

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c) Is there a place for Bittermens' chocolate bitters in this drink?

It is certainly worth playing with the Xocolatl Mole bitters in a 20th century, but the spice notes may be a bit in conflict with the Lillet. Honestly, it really comes down to your individual palate.

I will say that the chocolate extract (which is not a bitter - but an extract for bakers) that we have put together for Taza Chocolate works extremely well in a 20th century. We cut down the Creme de Cacao by half and then supplement with the chocolate extract and it makes for a beautiful little twist on the classic.

Avery Glasser

Bittermens, Inc. - Producers of Bittermens Bitters & Extracts

Bittermens Spirits, Inc. - Purveyors of Small Batch Bitter Liqueurs

Vendetta Spirits, LLC. - Nano-Importer of Hand-Produced Spirits

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