Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: Abra and Chufi in SW France - Tantalizing Tales of Tripe


Chufi
 Share

Recommended Posts

About epoisses: it's actually not that stinky. It's one of those cheeses that smells much stronger than it tastes.

It is strong, though. Though that reminds me of a dispute between my friends from Touraine and Alsace - they claimed (and I agree) that goat's cheese (Crottin de Chavignol and company) is odorless yet extremely pungent tasting, whereas Munster is smelly but doesn't actually pack a punch (whence the use of cumin seeds in it to bring out some flavors).

I have been following, and loving, your triple blog. Why on earth fear offal? It's the best stuff around! You guys should, in honor of bleudauvergne, take some leftover tripe and bread it and fry it to make tablier de sapeur with some gribiche sauce... I have been craving that ever since I started reading this blog.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We finished a dinner of leftover chicken, shredded and swimming in that delicious broth. Some of Lucy's wonderful salad, a hunk of yesterdays bread with some époisses. A glass of the leftover wine. A little slice of the prune and quince tart. It was a very good dinner. Now we're sitting by the fireplace, trying not to fall asleep.

We're not sure what tomorrow will bring. This blog won't be going for a whole week - (I must have a tiny bit of real vacation :smile: ) but we'll try and show you some interesting things before we say goodbye!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This blog won't be going for a whole week - (I must have a tiny bit of real vacation  :smile: ) but we'll try and show you some interesting things before we say goodbye!

Excuse me? We're being short-changed? I demand more! We'll all just have to come up with some virtual equivalent of the eager audience that won't leave the hall but instead stands and claps and whistles and stamps their feet until the performers return, grinning sheepishly, for more.

Can you pee in the ocean?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice to see Beppo featured in 2 blogs simultaneous-like. Funny how his countenance seems to take on a French aspect... the power of suggestion, or a testament to feline universality?

This has been ultracool. Thank you A., B., C. -- such cooking opportunity done complete justice. Not to slight the social component, of course.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After due consideration, a certain amount of persuasion, and a dose of reality, we hereby decree that this blog shall continue for our mutual amusement through tomorrow night. So we'll spend one more day together, just you, us and a pile of bones we happen to have in the fridge.

We don't have the whole day planned yet, but dinner is looking like marrow bones with parsley salad on toast, then oxtail and chestnut stew with a Brussels sprout and potato stamppot, for that Franco-Dutch flair. And then for dessert we need something not too rich, but good enough to end a blog with. We have a mountain of apples and a big bowl of walnuts. Any suggestions?

Oh, and the Champagne delivery lady came by today, so tomorrow night is bound to feature us trying out the new stash of bubbly.

And now, we're falling all over each other to see who can fall asleep first. Bonne nuit and Welterusten.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it isn't inappropriate, I'd like to know how trash and garbage are handled there, as opposed to in the USA or (Klary?) the Netherlands. For instance: that chicken head that went into the bin. Do you have to worry about animals getting into the trash? (Does Beppo find any foodstuffs irresistable?) Is there recycling there? Composting?

Have there been surprises for either of you? I admit, some of these questions have come from reading Abra's blog, so if it seems out of bounds, I apologize.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And then for dessert we need something not too rich, but good enough to end a blog with.

I vote for a souffle: impressive, light (as air, indeed), and lovely with champagne.

I wouldn't use either the apples or walnuts, though. Souffles call for whimsy, and apples and walnuts are lacking in whimsy.

Can you pee in the ocean?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While a souffle would be lovely, I'm thinking that a walnut tart might be a fitting end, although it might not be especially light. A walnut cake, perhaps? What about an apple tart studded with candied walnuts? Or could one pulverize some of those walnuts and use walnut flour in the pastry crust?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, and the Champagne delivery lady came by today, so tomorrow night is bound to feature us trying out the new stash of bubbly.

Champagne delivery lady?? To your house?? You've got to be kidding me!!! How much more can we take??

Mercy, merci!! :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're just getting ready to sit down at the table but I wanted to add one thing, there's another cook with us.  The one we've been referring to as "she". 

"She said it should take an hour and a half..."

"She said that it was originally made with puff pastry..."

"She thinks we should do it this way,"

If I were Paula, I would be very happy knowing that she is going to be referred to for generations as the "she" we look to not only for inspiration but valuable knowledge she gathered and shared for us to transmit.

And by some strange international synchronicity, the Los Angeles Times Food Section today (Dec 12) had a piece on an apple croustade, and mentions the one you made from Paula's book, and the phyllo/puff paste options. Good food- the international language.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh I am so sorry to hear this blog will be ending soon! It has been one of my favourites. :smile: Can we not persuade you to stay a little longer...?

The tripe and trotter dish had me salivating, as did the risotto and the sweetbreads with the lovely olive oil/cepe mashed potatoes. I think I will have to make a version of those potatoes very soon! That restaurant looks like a gem. I do hope I'll have the chance to visit someday!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ladies, please do continue for as long as you're able, for you shall most certainly have an audience! I am certain I am not alone in my praise of the prose and accompanying photos. Your escort throughout this culinary journey has been without par. I can't think of a more evocative foodblog in memory. Brava to all of you for the collective effort. It's been a breathtaking journey.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it isn't inappropriate, I'd like to know how trash and garbage are handled there, as opposed to in the USA or (Klary?) the Netherlands. 

Re garbage handling: I notice that here you take your little bags of trash and dump them into some sort of communal bin. In the Netherlands that is becoming more common, but where I live in Amsterdam, we still do it the old fashioned way: trying to remember to take out the large garbage bag the night before the garbage truck comes by to pick it up! In NL, we do recycle glass and paper. There was an experiment with recycling the green compostable stuff (you had to present 2 different garbage bags on garbageday) but apparently that didn't work so now we're back to 1 garbage bag for everything except glass and paper.

The tripe and trotter dish had me salivating, as did the risotto and the sweetbreads with the lovely olive oil/cepe mashed potatoes. I think I will have to make a version of those potatoes very soon! That restaurant looks like a gem. I do hope I'll have the chance to visit someday!

Ling, that potato dish was something that you would have loved! I have been thinking about the flavor of that ever since lunch yesterday. Chef Mariani said he only usues fresh cèpes, but if I were to try and make this at home, not having any fresh cèpes, I think I would make it with a combo of dried porcini and fresh chanterelles or other flavorful mushrooms.

It's another cold but sunny morning in the South of France. We had breakfast (pics will follow in a minute) and we've planned the day. There will be a country walk, a visit to a nearby town, some shopping, some cooking, some eating, some drinking. Just about the perfect vacation day I think!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now that I have my identity back, let me correct my alter-ego on one fine point. We do have our own garbage bin and put it out once a week, whereas the recycling bins are communal and are all over town. Sometimes we've even been known to drop recycling off in other towns, but possibly that would be considered rude.

And no, I don't think truffles are cheaper here. That was about $100 a person for lunch, obviously a rare treat, but one that was really worth having. The truffles were wild mountain truffles, as opposed to the ones more commonly found here, which although they're not exactly cultivated, are watered to increase their size thereby diluting their flavor.

So, this morning I awoke to the excellent news that I've sold a little article to a major food publication. If that wouldn't make me eat a nice bowl of tripe for breakfast, I don't know what would.

gallery_16307_5483_9294.jpg

Chufi's breakfast was much more normal.

gallery_16307_5483_43988.jpg

So now we're off into the cold for a good cross-country walk. All we've been doing is eat, and I think we're both twitching for some exercise and fresh air. We'll be back, all rosy-cheeked and out of breath, after a bit.

Meanwhile, what about those dessert ideas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had an excellent walk.

gallery_21505_5478_52127.jpg

gallery_21505_5478_59315.jpg

It took us to a nearby town where we found a pottery shop with some really beautiful stuff:

gallery_21505_5478_18660.jpg

I bought one of those little gratin dishes and I can't wait to take it home and cook something in it!

We also visited a very interesting bakery/mill, where they mill their own flour and bake their bread with spring water that they bring in from the Alps. This bread was baked with flour that was milled just this morning:

gallery_21505_5478_18174.jpg

gallery_21505_5478_48072.jpg

Home for lunch:

gallery_21505_5478_28409.jpg

Now we'll be making some grocery lists and head to the supermarket, one I haven't been to yet, so that's another fun excursion for me. Abra is getting worried that I'm not having enough 'fun' on my vacation because we're basically just cooking and shopping and eating. But, doesn't this seem like any eGulleters dream vacation to you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now THIS is a magical moment:

gallery_21505_5478_48072.jpg

It's as it has been, as it was in the AGO, not one bow to modern or latest or new. The shine of the wood and the sun through the windows---I can see it, I can SMELL it, with the baking aromas dancing with the wood scent in the air. Even the clearish bags, holding their waiting burden---just a bit of imagination makes them a translucent silk, with the freshest flour on Earth there for the dipping.

And those barbell breads, looking like immense crusty scepters wielded by kings---you MUST have taken one home, nestling it warm to your body for the trek through the cold, hardly able to keep from tearing off great chunks for the journey, and crackling through that crust for the palette painted on that lunch plate.

Our own doings and preparings have been so satisfying and nourishing that I have taken this as a great bonus to the joys of the season.

No real envy til now. But I covet, I do.

Edited by racheld (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wasn't able to get near a computer yesterday, and it was KILLING me....thinking about what you were up to! Oh my, my, my.

I think that I'm in love with Beppo. Is he bilingual now? Our cats are completely fluent, especially when food is involved.

Chufi: do you think that you must have a fresh mushroom for those potatoes? or can you go with all dried? You do have a way with mashed things! I like the 'fork' texture of the potatoes. And now I have to go out and buy sweetbreads because it's been too long since I've eaten them.

And that cauliflower puree...with truffle...that sounds divine.

What a lunch!!

Abra: can you explain a bit more about those truffles? I wasn't aware that truffles could be cultivated in any way. Manipulated for "freshness" yes, but cultivated? How/where are they doing that? Did your area have a decent truffle season? Italy was terrible this year.

And congrats on selling an article!! Brava!!

And thank you all for sharing this amazing culinary adventure with us. Tonight, in all our different time zones, we raise a glass to these wonderful, wacky women! :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well yeah, why don't you just come and live in France? That's what we wondered, and so we did. It's very interesting and rewarding, baffling, beautiful. And yes, the Champagne delivery lady did come right to the door. We'll pop a cork tonight and tell you whether it was worth it to open the door to her. Not really, of course I'd have opened the door, because she belongs to the secret vegetable club that I've been invited into.

The bread that you saw at lunch is a pain Aveyronnais that comes from the bakery right next door to the house. Later we'll crack the loaf of milled-this-morning bread to use as toasts for the marrow with parsley salad.

Right now the oxtail is simmering away in its bath of Picpoul de Pinet, with onions, carrots and a bouquet garni. Later Toulouse sausage, chestnuts, and a bit of ham will be added. It smells delicious already.

We really hoped that Pille would be able to come join us for this blog, but she wasn't able to make it. Thus we find Chufi in the kitchen making a Pille apple cake, which we plan to dust with spekulaas crumbs that Chufi brought from Amsterdam. Of course she brought whole cookies, not crumbs, but you know what I mean.

Me, I'm planning to take a nice glass of rosé into the shower, wash off the dust of our walk, and prepare myself for the marrow bones. They always freak me out a tiny bit, and fortification is required. I know, a person who eats tripe for breakfast doesn't seem like someone who'd have a hissy over marrow, but that's just the way I am.

And speaking of the secret vegetable club, because we've been besieged with requests to keep the blog alive, and because tomorrow is in fact Vegetable Morning, we'll be ending the blog sometime tomorrow, and not tonight. So you can sleep sweetly, secure in the knowledge that we'll still be here in the morning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And speaking of the secret vegetable club, because we've been besieged with requests to keep the blog alive, and because tomorrow is in fact Vegetable Morning, we'll be ending the blog sometime tomorrow, and not tonight.  So you can sleep sweetly, secure in the knowledge that we'll still be here in the morning.

We need a happy dance smiley!! I am doing it right here in my chair in Richmond, VA wishing I was in France!!! This is like a novel you wish would never, ever end! Thank you so much, ladies for your generosity!

Kim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      The first week of November are „autumn holidays“ in the area where I live. We wanted to use that time to go to Paris, but when my parents-in-law somewhat surprisingly announced they‘d be coming over from Spain for the whole of November, we scrapped that idea and looked for something more German …
       
      So … Berlin. Not the best time to travel (cold & rainy), but with a couple of museums for the little one and the slightly older ones to enjoy together, plus some food options I was looking forward it was a destination we could all agree on. The Covid19 warnings in the Berlin subway support that notion …
       

       
    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...