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Cooking my Goose


magnolia
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Anna, are you Danish? Our friends from Denmark, so dear to us that we usually refer to them as our Danish family, have goose every Christmas. And Danish open-face sandwiches, oh my... :wub: We have learned a whole new meaning of sandwiches from them. One of the most delicious open-face sandwiches that Lise made for us had raw egg yolk and anchovies. Please let me know if you've had anything like that!

Whenever our supply of goose fat gets low, it's time for another goose. That happens more than once a year.

Danish by choice if not by birth :biggrin: I'm a Brit but married a Dane and fell in love with Danish food. Must admit that I have never tried the anchovy/raw egg one! Favourite open-faced sandwich? Warm duck and red cabbage. Roll on February!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've reason to believe that I'll be receiving David Bouley's East of Paris : The New Cuisines of Austria and the Danube as an early Xmas present in a few days.

I've a 10-12 pd goose on its way. (Thanks, Guajolote.)

How about sides, etc. from Bouley's book?

Thoughts, suggestions, and so on?

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Goose... Duck... Goose... Duck... Goose... Duck...

You know... It comes down to... What kind of fat do I want? :laugh:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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OK... Rereading the thread maybe I do both since a goose doesn't feed that many people.

What is the deal with all of the fruit being used with goose? My family doesn't really like sweet with their savory. I haven't picked up either magazine yet. Does any one of those recommended have good savory ideas?

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Also check the current issue of Bon Appetit is has a funny article by David Leite accompanied by a very tasty sounding recipe for roast goose. I might try that myself this year.

The Mustard and Garlic Roast Goose? I cooked that for Thanksgiving. It was delicious. The cooking method is perfect.

Ours was about 12 pounds, for the two of us, and we used up the leftovers tonight. I LOVE having the "other" leftovers, the broth from the carcasse, all that wonderful fat, and the liver for a yummy pate'. :wub:

I consider this recipe, by our very own, quite savory.

It was delicious!!!

Edited to add this link for the recipe.

And to mention... we find a duck is just one meal for the two of us, but we get two meals plus from a goose of this size.

Edited by Susan in FL (log)

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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As with any bird, the most important aspect is obtaining a fresh goose. But since thier is so much fat that must be rendered, a frozen one can be good. It's also pretty difficult to ruin one. For two people, I would really suggest a duckling as a goose is too much for two but if your heart is set on it, go to it! -Dick

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I have a Showtime Rotisserie and a gas-grill rotisserie. Would cooking the goose in either of these be advisable, or should I stick to an electric oven? I like the way chickens come out in the rotisserie, but I would worry about the extra fat for a goose.

Thanks

Roz

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Great timing, sick of turkey so this Christmas I'm doing goose and steak!!!! Still haven't decided what recipe to use yet.. By the way any tips on purchasing, only bought it once a few years back frozen don't recollect much else.

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I've reason to believe that I'll be receiving David Bouley's East of Paris : The New Cuisines of Austria and the Danube as an early Xmas present in a few days.

I've a 10-12 pd goose on its way. (Thanks, Guajolote.)

How about sides, etc. from Bouley's book?

Thoughts, suggestions, and so on?

12-14 lb.

i havn't seen this book, but i love austrian style sweet and sour red cabbage with apples.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 10 months later...

I don't know about unusual, but Potato Stuffing is traditional, maybe with extra chestnuts and/or fruit (apple, apricot)...Lots of recipes on the web.

If you have a wood fired oven I guess you know that you need to let it cool from pizza temperatures. Alan Scott (builder of fine ovens) just sent a message to the Brick Oven List, another excellent resource (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/brick-oven/)

You will get an amazing amount of wonderful fat from the geese, To prevent burning put the goose over a large pan with some water in it. Even so you will have to empty the pan half way through to stop it overflowing. This fat is like gold for roasting potatoes, confit and other delicious things.

I quote from Alan's email, as it contains the key techniques and temperatures. A goose breast is much thinner than a turkey, so it won't take as long to cook, but the principle is the same, and if you cook it in a cool oven the danger of overcooking is less.

I'll be the first to say thw out Thanksgiving turkey baked the best yet this year thanks to all the posts of late on the subject. I built a fire yesterday late and preheated the oven so that this morning it was

375 degrees. At 10 am I put the turkey in well wrapped in foil with just a little olive oil on it to stop the foil sticking. I removed the bird at 3 pm and the temperature was down to 310 degrees (reading the probe in the dome set 1" deep in the first arch brick off the wall).

Then I replaced a fire with fast burning soft wood and let this burn until 5:15 pm and raked it out with the temperatures now back to 485 on top and 660 on the hearth. I seasoned the now very tender turkey with herbs and salt and olive oil and put it back uncovered for exactly 30 minutes with beets, onions and sweet potatoes as well in separate dishes, plus a sprinkling of apple wood chips on the hearth for flavor.

Right on 6 pm all was cooked to perfection and the turkey had a golden brown color all over and inside, the most tender juicy flesh imaginable.

I hope everyone else enjoyed the feast and family time as much as we all did here.

ALAN

check my web site     http://www.ovencrafters.net

Another contributor writes:

The Thanksgiving feast was a great one and I, too, want to thank everyone who posted their thoughts on wood fired feasting. For us, this was the 2nd full firing of our oven. I started the fire Friday morning and invited the neighbors over for pizza and then to bake their Thanksgiving Day bread or rolls...that was a hit and as a result I am sure that everyone got a late start preparing the next day's dinner. After the pizza I shoveled out the coals and set them aside to bake bread. Once the breads were done I returned the coals to the oven and closed things up. We then brined our turkey using a recipe we found on line from Chez Pannisse and went to bed.

Thursday morning the oven was around 375- 400 degrees. I started a small fire to create some coals and when it felt right I tossed in some mesquite chips, three 14 pound turkeys (loosely covered), and closed things up. Some time later ( I lose track of time, sorry)...I checked the internal temp of the birds and found them to be right about 165 but still needed some browning. I pulled them out, started another small fire that brought my coals back to life and reinserted  the birds. About 1/2 hour later they emerged golden brown and amazing. The entire neighborhood is having a great time with this oven. I thank this group for the discussion and dedication to great food and fun.

Happy Holidays!

Gary Jones

Edited by jackal10 (log)
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I'm cooking two geese in our wood-fired bread oven this Christmas. Does anyone have any thoughts on unusual recipes, rubs, stuffing?

I know it's a bit late for the Thanksgiving Goose, but still time for Christmas (or any other 'Gooseing' time).

Take two medium unpeeled Onions, slice into three, place cut sides onto ungreased flat burner top, or cast iron pan, and 'char' til black !!.

Place into Goose cavety with as many unpeeled but cored Apples and a good 'handful' of 'MUGWORT' / "Artemesia Vulgaris", Salt, fresh ground Pepper, plus some Marjoram

Roast as usual. :smile:

Peter
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I don't know about unusual, but Potato Stuffing is traditional, maybe with extra chestnuts and/or fruit (apple, apricot)...Lots of recipes on the web.

If you have a wood fired oven I guess you know that you need to let it cool from pizza temperatures. Alan Scott (builder of fine ovens) just sent a message to the Brick Oven List, another excellent resource (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/brick-oven/)

You will get an amazing amount of wonderful fat from the geese, To prevent burning put the goose over a large pan with some water in it. Even so you will have to empty the pan half way through to stop it overflowing. This fat is like gold for roasting potatoes, confit and other delicious things.

I quote from Alan's email, as it contains the key techniques and temperatures. A goose breast is much thinner than a turkey, so it won't take as long to cook, but the principle is the same, and if you cook it in a cool oven the danger of overcooking is less.

I'll be the first to say thw out Thanksgiving turkey baked the best yet this year thanks to all the posts of late on the subject. I built a fire yesterday late and preheated the oven so that this morning it was

375 degrees. At 10 am I put the turkey in well wrapped in foil with just a little olive oil on it to stop the foil sticking. I removed the bird at 3 pm and the temperature was down to 310 degrees (reading the probe in the dome set 1" deep in the first arch brick off the wall).

Then I replaced a fire with fast burning soft wood and let this burn until 5:15 pm and raked it out with the temperatures now back to 485 on top and 660 on the hearth. I seasoned the now very tender turkey with herbs and salt and olive oil and put it back uncovered for exactly 30 minutes with beets, onions and sweet potatoes as well in separate dishes, plus a sprinkling of apple wood chips on the hearth for flavor.

Right on 6 pm all was cooked to perfection and the turkey had a golden brown color all over and inside, the most tender juicy flesh imaginable.

I hope everyone else enjoyed the feast and family time as much as we all did here.

ALAN

check my web site    http://www.ovencrafters.net

Another contributor writes:

The Thanksgiving feast was a great one and I, too, want to thank everyone who posted their thoughts on wood fired feasting. For us, this was the 2nd full firing of our oven. I started the fire Friday morning and invited the neighbors over for pizza and then to bake their Thanksgiving Day bread or rolls...that was a hit and as a result I am sure that everyone got a late start preparing the next day's dinner. After the pizza I shoveled out the coals and set them aside to bake bread. Once the breads were done I returned the coals to the oven and closed things up. We then brined our turkey using a recipe we found on line from Chez Pannisse and went to bed.

Thursday morning the oven was around 375- 400 degrees. I started a small fire to create some coals and when it felt right I tossed in some mesquite chips, three 14 pound turkeys (loosely covered), and closed things up. Some time later ( I lose track of time, sorry)...I checked the internal temp of the birds and found them to be right about 165 but still needed some browning. I pulled them out, started another small fire that brought my coals back to life and reinserted  the birds. About 1/2 hour later they emerged golden brown and amazing. The entire neighborhood is having a great time with this oven. I thank this group for the discussion and dedication to great food and fun.

Happy Holidays!

Gary Jones

THANK YOU, GREAT HELP JOINED THE GROUP

NN

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  • 4 weeks later...

Duck is roasting as I post. Stuffed with apples, raisins and prunes.

Red cabbage simmering stove top and later I will make candied baby potatoes.......the smell is devine. Glaedig jul all.

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I'm sorry I didn't see this thread sooner, but I figured best to post anyway for future "roast goose" searchers. Click here for a posting of the roast goose two ways recipe from Les Halles Brasserie in NYC. We had it at the restaurant's Christmas party and I thought it was a great way to handle a goose. Of course, where you're going to get 4 lbs of goose fat, don't ask me!

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I know that most people like to see a whole roast bird on the table, but this does not work well with goose - the breast meat will be beyond dry before the legs are cooked. I bought a goose last Christmas and broke it down into breast and legs as I would a duck. In fact I roasted the breast, just like a magret, to very rare, and served it with a sour cherry red wine reduction. It drew raves. Later I made confit of the legs

Ruth Friedman

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