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Soya Milk in Vancouver


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I've been buying "So Nice" for the last few years and finding that the price is becoming astronomical, especially at Caper's where the price is twice that of Superstore.

I use to drink the one that you use to buy in the Chinese grocery and now it's sold side by side with So Nice. I forget the brand name but it is sold in a two or four litre plastic bottle and much cheaper.

However, So Nice is fortified and taste less beany - maybe that's why it's pricier? The "Chinese" brand is not fortified and does not have as long a shelf life. I know there is a difference in taste but due to cost I'm thinking of switching brands.

Does anyone know what the biggest difference is as far as processing goes between these two brands? I don't need the fortification but need the soy for it's estrogen-like quality.

I hope this is in the right thread to post as it pertains to two specific brands found in BC.

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Just ran downstairs to see the brand that my mom bought and it's Korean :sad:. I'm no expert when it comes to soy milk since I dislike it. But from what you've said about the beany taste and the shorter shelf life I would guess the Chinese brand would be better in regard to nutrient value. I've heard from some people who like soy milk that the sweeter/tastier kinds usually lack a lot of the nutrients that soy milk is supposed to deliver. Just a guess though.

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Take a look at the ingredient list for any of the "mainstream" brands of soy milk. If that isn't enough to turn you off from soy milk doctored up to NOT taste like soybeans, then go with what your tastebuds prefer.

Personally, I expect soy milk to taste like soy milk/soybeans, so I strongly prefer the Chinese brands (Sunrise and Superior). The ingredient list is basically just soybeans and water (plus sugar for the sweetened versions). The basic Vitasoy versions in the Tetrapaks are also unadulterated soy milk.

The mainstream brands of soy milk taste artificial to me, whereas unadulterated soy milk has a clean aftertaste. Again, this is a matter of personal preference.

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Thanks for the replies. The brand I use to drink when I was young is Sunrise and Superior. The beany flavour is good. I never thought of what they do to get the bean taste out. but it sounds highly suspicious.

I'll give the old brands another try and hope that I haven't lost my appreciation for it.

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Since switching my entire family to soy, we've tried Lactaid (a lactose-free milk), So Nice, Sunrise, Silk and another brand I don't recall at the moment. Basically, we've tried them all.

We now use Silk exclusively. It's less "beany" as you say and you can buy in bulk at Costco (3 pack for $7.99, I believe). Unopened, the boxes last quite awhile. I even use it for baking and cooking (not exactly the same but in small quantities you can't tell the difference).

Starbucks uses Silk soy as well. I like the Chinese version of Sunrise soy milk but prefer it sweetened and expect the beany taste it delivers. Great with fried Chinese donuts! Just doesn't taste great with my tea.

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Mainstream soy brands (So Nice, etc) are meant to be milk substitutes and have been doctored up to taste as close to milk as possible. The Chinese brands are meant to be taste like soy, and be drunk as is. Personally, I can't stand the mainstream stuff and love the beany flavour of real, Chinese soy. But then again, that's what I had as a kid!

Hot soy and Chinese fried donuts are just about the best breakfast in the world - yum!

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But then again, that's what I had as a kid! 

Hot soy and Chinese fried donuts are just about the best breakfast in the world - yum!

I never grew up with soy milk and probably didn't try it until I was in college. I still prefer the straight stuff (sweetened or unsweetened), so perhaps it's imprinted in my DNA.

Is the hot soy sweetened or unsweetened? Never thought of drinking it this way.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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But then again, that's what I had as a kid! 

Hot soy and Chinese fried donuts are just about the best breakfast in the world - yum!

I never grew up with soy milk and probably didn't try it until I was in college. I still prefer the straight stuff (sweetened or unsweetened), so perhaps it's imprinted in my DNA.

Is the hot soy sweetened or unsweetened? Never thought of drinking it this way.

You can have it both ways. I prefer sweetened, since unsweetened is a bit bland.

There's also the salty kind, which takes a little getting used to. You get hot unsweetened soy, add a bit of soy sauce, sesame oil, hot chili oil, and a good splash of vinegar. The vinegar curdles the soy and thickens it. Garnish with chopped scallions and cilantro, chopped mustard pickles, those little dried shrimp or pork floss. This is also a breakfast dish. Looks like vomit, but tastes heavenly!

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There's also the salty kind, which takes a little getting used to.  You get hot unsweetened soy, add a bit of soy sauce, sesame oil, hot chili oil, and a good splash of vinegar.  The vinegar curdles the soy and thickens it.  Garnish with chopped scallions and cilantro, chopped mustard pickles, those little dried shrimp or pork floss.  This is also a breakfast dish.  Looks like vomit, but tastes heavenly!

Thanks.

So the other one you are referring to is a drink, and this one is more like a savory soup? Sounds similar to congee without the rice. Is there a name for it, so I can try ordering it sometime?

Yet another reason to choose unadultered, unsweetened soy milk! (I keep some simple syrup around for when I want to drink it sweetened.)

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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I became a vegan at 14 (in 1982) and I started drinking soy milk as soon as I discovered it. I'm not a vegan anymore, but I've never gotten over the *squick* feeling of putting milk on cereal, so I still use soymilk. It's always been Sunrise for me!!

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There's also the salty kind, which takes a little getting used to.  You get hot unsweetened soy, add a bit of soy sauce, sesame oil, hot chili oil, and a good splash of vinegar.  The vinegar curdles the soy and thickens it.  Garnish with chopped scallions and cilantro, chopped mustard pickles, those little dried shrimp or pork floss.  This is also a breakfast dish.  Looks like vomit, but tastes heavenly!

Thanks.

So the other one you are referring to is a drink, and this one is more like a savory soup? Sounds similar to congee without the rice. Is there a name for it, so I can try ordering it sometime?

Yet another reason to choose unadultered, unsweetened soy milk! (I keep some simple syrup around for when I want to drink it sweetened.)

Yes, it is definately more soup-like than drink-like (you eat it with a spoon). You can usually find it in Shanghai & northern Chinese restaurants (this forum has a bunch of recommendations). It's normally just listed as "salty soy milk" or some such on the menus. Unfortunately, it's usually only available at lunch on weekends only!

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Yes, it is definately more soup-like than drink-like (you eat it with a spoon).  You can usually find it in Shanghai & northern Chinese restaurants (this forum has a bunch of recommendations).  It's normally just listed as "salty soy milk" or some such on the menus.  Unfortunately, it's usually only available at lunch on weekends only!

Thanks, I'll look out for it next time!

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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  • 1 month later...

I've always liked the more "beany" flavour of the Chinese soy milks too but always disappointed that they weren't fortified (I need my calcium!).

I'm happy to report, though, that last week at T&T I saw a Soya Beverage by Sunrise. It's enriched (28% calcium, compared with "mainstream" soy milk brands at 30% and regular milk at 30%) and tastes just the way I like it (albeit maybe a touch "chalky", but I don't know if that's expectation bias).

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I've always liked the more "beany" flavour of the Chinese soy milks too but always disappointed that they weren't fortified (I need my calcium!).

I'm happy to report, though, that last week at T&T I saw a Soya Beverage by Sunrise. It's enriched (28% calcium, compared with "mainstream" soy milk brands at 30% and regular milk at 30%) and tastes just the way I like it (albeit maybe a touch "chalky", but I don't know if that's expectation bias).

The chalky texture sounds similar to calcium fortified orange juice which I find gross. I've been buying Sunrise and I supplement with calcium anyways. I find that the expiration date is very short so I have to freeze some of the two litres soya milk that I buy. Do they not make anything smaller than two litres? I don't care for the tetra packs as I want the freshest and most unadulterated soya milk.

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