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Champagne cocktails


Dave the Cook
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We have a great topic on "Cocktails With Champagne, As Opposed to Champagne Cocktails." This topic here is for what Sam calls ". . . drinks that are fundamentally champagne with stuff added in . . . "

Today I had a revelation. I was casting about for a light drink (it's not good manners to pass out face down in the mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving dinner, but the celebratory mood of the day calls for, well, a celebratory drink). Plus, cooking is thirsty work.

It being one of those rare occasions when I have orange juice in the fridge, I settled on a good old Mimosa. something I often have at brunches (not being a Bloody Mary fan). It occurred to me that I'd never made one according to a recipe; I've always just sloshed some OJ into a flute and topped it off. so, it being a day of many recipes, I looked it up. To my surprise, according to Gary Regan (in Joy of Mixology), triple sec is an essential ingredient:

Many people omit the triple sec . . . (I)t's a big mistake.

So of course I made it his way. He's right.

Mimosa

0.5 oz triple sec

1.5 oz orange juice

3.5 oz chilled champagne

Build in a flute in the order listed.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I've been making a drink with grenadine (homemade; Pom mixed 1:1 with sugar) and bitters that's very good -- spicy and kind of medicinal (in fact, a friend suggested naming it "Dr. Robert").

So, Dr. Robert it is:

Pour .25 oz. grenadine and about 1/2 tsp. of Angostura bitters into a champagne flute and top with dry sparkling wine or champagne.

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  • 1 year later...

When we went to Alinea a couple of years ago, we were given a champagne cocktail to start the evening. It was Does anyone know the recipe? I believe it had dashes of Campari, Benedictine... and... um....

The Champagne cocktail at Alinea seems to change quite often, perhaps monthly. If you can be more precise on the date, I might be able to find a menu from that time frame that lists pairings. Happen to have a menu from March '08 sitting here and it says Cocktail of Louis Roederer Brut with Roussanne, Spiced Mead, and Curaçao.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Closest I could find at the moment is from mid-October, 2007:

Cocktail of Paul Laurent Brut, Lillet, Campari, Pineau, and Vya

Served with Duck - Pumpkin, Banana, Thai Flavor

Does that sound right? If not, I can ask a few folks this evening who have much greater resources than myself.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Not to be too picky, but the menu I have is from 8 November, 2007. As KD1191 said, the cocktail (and the menu) changes -- in this case, in ways that most people wouldn't notice: Roederer Brut instead of Paul Laurent; butternut squash rather than pumpkin. Go figure.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So, I'm looking to add a "classic" Royale... champagne-based cocktail to a special drink menu for some "visiting dignitaries".

What's your favorite?

Seelsbach Cocktail?

French 75?

Champagne Cocktail?

Other?

Thanks in advance,

Steve

Edited by skbohler (log)
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Not a bartender just a bar patron.

The Seelsbach seems to have an overwhelming amount of bitters, so unless it's described that way I would hate to serve it to the unsuspecting.

Never had a French 75 but it has such a sophisticated sound to it. ooo-la-la. Can you serve that on a frilly doily?

It is always surprising to me how many people have never had a Champagne Cocktail, and don't really know what it is. Always a pleasing drink.

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Random thought: The French 75 is named after a type of cannon used in World War I, and was ostensibly created by fighter ace Raoul Lufbery... an apt drink (sort of) for the 11th of November.

Edited by John Rosevear (log)

John Rosevear

"Brown food tastes better." - Chris Schlesinger

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How about an Old Cuban. Not very champagne forward, and much more useful in the summer, but still a tasty drink.

edited to add my reading comprehension skills that said "This topic here is for what Sam calls ". . . drinks that are fundamentally champagne with stuff added in . . . "" are lacking more than slightly.

Edited by aidan (log)
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Not a bartender just a bar patron.

The Seelsbach seems to have an overwhelming amount of bitters, so unless it's described that way I would hate to serve it to the unsuspecting.

Never had a French 75 but it has such a sophisticated sound to it. ooo-la-la. Can you serve that on a frilly doily?

It is always surprising to me how many people have never had a Champagne Cocktail, and don't really know what it is. Always a pleasing drink.

A properly made Seelbach shouldn't be overwhelmingly bitter, just balanced and delicious. And of course one could simply cut down on the bitters to taste.

French 75's are grand. Champagne cocktails are classic.

And there's always the option of adding "sweetening agent liqueur" of your choosing and then topping off, be it Cassis (only the really good Cassis du Bourgogne stuff) or Chambord, a little splash of St. Germain, or B&B, or Amaretto (again - only use the good stuff like Luxardo and a little goes a long way), or Chartreuse or whatever YOU LIKE and putting in a lemon or orange twist and/or a splash of bitters, also of your choosing. Easy Peasy and as unique and delicious as the host of the party.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Closest I could find at the moment is from mid-October, 2007:

Cocktail of Paul Laurent Brut, Lillet, Campari, Pineau, and Vya

Served with Duck - Pumpkin, Banana, Thai Flavor

Does that sound right? If not, I can ask a few folks this evening who have much greater resources than myself.

This sounds really interesting. Do you or Chris have any idea as to ratios or amounts in the recipe?

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My favourite Champagne cocktail has always been the Kir Royale, Ardent Spirits style:

5oz chilled champagne

1/2 oz creme de cassis

lemon twist for garnish

very nice and refreshing

"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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