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lucylou95816

Foodblog: Lucylou95816

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racheld   

And an indispensible ingredient in REAL Paminna Cheese.

Was there ANY cheese in that topping as well? I've never tried broiling Durkee's before, but didn't know it would glaze like that. Must be the eggs and xanthan gum.

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And an indispensible ingredient in REAL Paminna Cheese.

Was there ANY cheese in that topping as well?  I've never tried broiling Durkee's before, but didn't know it would glaze like that.  Must be the eggs and xanthan gum.

Paminna cheese? Sounds interesting. What's the recipe?

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stephanie,

wow what beautiful food. i want those thanksgiving onions. i've loved the pictures of the animals as well. thanks for blogging on a decidedly busy week.

suzi

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I am really enjoying your blog! Umm..what's durkee sauce?

Thank you, looks like Sandy beat me to the durkee sauce. It actually has quite a high carb count, I think like 8 grams per serving, which is probably no more than 2 tbsp.

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I'm really enjoying your blog, Steph!  I especially liked seeing the consumed bottles of wine at Thanksgiving.  My husband was walking by and said "they drink like we do"  :biggrin:

Thank you. That can be scary and good. :smile:

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So I mentioned cooking for a homeless shelter. I am a member of the Junior League of Sacramento, and we had commited to making a Thanksgiving Dinner for St. John's Shelter for Women and Children. [...] For those of you that don't know, the Junior League raises money to help disadvantaged women and children.  One of the ways we do that is to sell cookbooks.  Here's a link if you'd like to buy a soon to be newly released cookbook as a Christmas gift.  If that isn't appropriate to put here, please let me know.  They should be shipped by Christmas.

Is there a Junior League anywhere in the country that does not produce a cookbook as a fundraiser for their charitable work? IMO, "Junior League Cookbook" should be trademarked like "Girl Scout Cookies."

I signed up to make stuffing.  After contemplating my week, I decided that I'll take some Stove Top stuffing and (please god don't strike me down) Sandra Lee it.  (I don't condone that woman, personal opinion.)

You have heard, haven't you, that Miss Semi-Homemade has a new autobiography out?

It's called Made From Scratch. :huh: The customers on Amazon.com give it decidedly mixed reviews.

I am really enjoying your blog! Umm..what's durkee sauce?

Here you go:

Durkee Famous Sauce - An American Cult Classic Since 1857!

It's great on roast beef, among other things.

Thanks for putting up the information regarding durkee sauce. Yes, I do believe that the Junior League and Girl Scout Cookies should be in the same category. I guess the cool thing about Jr. League cookbooks from different regions of the US is that you would probably get a "regional" type of cookbook based on where the League is based out of.

Well, being that I am not a Miss Lee fan, I will probably pass on her book. Thanks for reading!

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And an indispensible ingredient in REAL Paminna Cheese.

Was there ANY cheese in that topping as well?  I've never tried broiling Durkee's before, but didn't know it would glaze like that.  Must be the eggs and xanthan gum.

I will double check on the cheese question. I don't believe so. But in the spirit of the egullet foodblog, I may have to wander down to the pub in a little bit, because more than likely, the chef of the yankee doodles will be there. But after I post some pics from the farmers market today.

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stephanie,

wow what beautiful food.  i want those thanksgiving onions.  i've loved the pictures of the animals as well.  thanks for blogging on a decidedly busy week.

suzi

Suzy, thanks for the message. I am glad that it has been enjoyable. We're not done yet, so be sure to check back. If you'd like the recipe for the onions, let me know, I can ask my dad's girlfriend for them and PM you the recipe when I get it.

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Ok, I have a ton of pictures from the Farmers Market and my shopping trip to a favorite grocery store. I'll be back in a bit.

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Hi Everyone, the last day of the foodblog, hard to believe. But first, I would be remiss to not wish Riley a Happy 11th Birthday. Happy Birthday Riley! He's as happy as an 11 year old can be:

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Ok, I went to the Sacramento farmers market today. I have so many pictures, that it's good that the blog is almost over, since my account is practically filled up. I apologize in advance, for slower internet connections, I edited out a bunch but really felt like the ones I picked needed to be in here.

It takes place under a freeway, as hzrt8w had said back in his blog several months ago.

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Why it takes underplace there I have no idea. I typically only go to this market when I want to buy tomatoes or cucumbers for canning. Today, actually surprised me with lots of stuff I have never noticed before or that is new. I didn't buy a whole lot, in fact this is all I got:

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Some onions that I'll need to for dinner tonight and some fresh tomatoes for a salad at some point this week.

Of course, being that we are a political town, no farmers market would be complete without your political advocates

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Ok, so on with what the market had to offer today

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Don't know what these are, I couldn't understand the guy. Maybe someone knows?

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I would hate to have a dishonest wine? Would that give you a different type of hangover?

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Lots of heirloom tomatoes still out there.

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Oh taters how I miss thee

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Sweet green onion? I'm going to try them tonight in something.

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The Lady asked me to take a picture of that, something that you can grow your own mushrooms on.

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These are hulled cherry tomatoes. The guy let me have one to taste, and they were really nutty tasting. He said that some people say almost pinapple/nutty. I thought they were really good. I should have bought some.

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Some of the biggest garlic I have seen in a while out here.

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surprised to see corn still in season.

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I think I 'll start a new post, some of the pictures weren't coming up.


Edited by lucylou95816 (log)

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And an indispensible ingredient in REAL Paminna Cheese.

Was there ANY cheese in that topping as well?  I've never tried broiling Durkee's before, but didn't know it would glaze like that.  Must be the eggs and xanthan gum.

I googled Paminna Cheese and got referred to a post of yours..on egullet :laugh:

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I am really enjoying your blog! Umm..what's durkee sauce?

Thank you, looks like Sandy beat me to the durkee sauce. It actually has quite a high carb count, I think like 8 grams per serving, which is probably no more than 2 tbsp.

Yes thanks Sandy! I will have to pick some up on my next trip to the States..quite the story..Durkee sauce.

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My second journey of the day was to one of my other favorite grocery store. Before I go, let's check my list to make sure I have everything I need on it for dinner.

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Tonight's dinner, for your viewing pleasure, I'll be making Tyler's Ultimate Meatballs, with a low carb twist.

So here we are off to Corti Brothers.

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I like this grocery store for many reasons. One is the personalized service that you can get, from the Deli to the Meat Counter to the wine section. Their produce is not always the best of the best, but they did have the cardoni that I was interested in trying.

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In fact, the produce guy said that they are usually the only ones to carry it. You'll also find all kinds of Italian specialties, Panattoni Bread and probably the world's largest selection of pasta. Let's just get to that. I have never seen a pasta aisle like this before ever.

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Not likely to see any golden grain or generic brands in that group.

The main reason I come to Corti's is for the meat. They do the obvious, order fresh turkeys for Christmas and Thanksgiving, they can order just about any cut of meat you want, they really are a one stop shop.

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They just started carrying Estancia meat. I haven't bought any yet, but a friend has and said it was great.

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Lamb

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ground meats and bacon

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Pork

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chicken parts and pieces

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fish, which was a little sparse today. If we get any crabs from SF, which may be sparse this year due to an oil spill, they usually are filled up with crabs.

Next is their deli section, which is equally as cool.

Starts off with a prepared food section. Twice baked potatoes, meat loaf, salads, not quite sure what those things in the right hand section are. Usually this stuff is great, since they make it right there.

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Fresh cheeses and pesto

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Next are wursts, salami's, sausages

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All types of cured hams

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They roast alot of their own deli meat, which is really good.

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More sausage

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Huge selection of cheese in the deli

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Huge Olive bar

Now if that deli cheese wasn't enough for you. They also have a self serve cheese area and here's what it looks like:

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I forgot to take a picture of the other end which has a bunch of asiago, parmesan, etc.

They usually have one or two out for sample too.

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Some other things that are unique to Corti's, one that I forgot to photograph was their selection of San Marzano tomatoes. At least 10-15 brands. I like using these when I am making a tomato sauce, as you'll see tonight.

They have an excellent wine selection

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It would not be unusual to be out to dinner with a friend, and see the wine gurus from Corti's having dinner, and trying multiple bottles. This happened to us one night, and the wine guy came over, because he knew someone we were eating with, and gave us each a glass of dessert wine they were tasting to go with our dessert. That was pretty cool.

I also found this interesting wine in a weird package. Maybe something like what Sam was talking about earlier this week.

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Juice boxes for adults.

In the freezer section, they have some of the coolest ice cream available anywhere. A while back I had posted something about Dr. Bob's on the dinner thread. By far, one of the best chocolate ice creams out there.

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And demi glace as well as house made raviolis, sauce, gnocchi and almost anything else you can imagine.

Whew, ok, I need a break, loading all of those pictures takes some time. I think that we'll head off to Raven for a bit, see if the yankee doodle girl is there, and ask Hugo about how to prepare this cardoni. See you all after dinner!

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Sometimes egullet likes to play tricks on me. Perhaps the posts were too photo heavy, so'll cut the farmers market one up into two:

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Some big ass squash. I forgot the name, I am sure someone here will know. They were nearly 3 feet long.

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another veg I don't know the name of. I think its used in Asian cuisine?

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Apples are big here, since up about 40 minutes away is Apple Hill that is a popular place to go this time of year for apples, apple pie, wine tasting, getting Christmas trees. It's fun, but gets really crowded.

In addition to all this, they had a pork guy, an oyster guy, a couple other fish guys, some bread, cheeses, lavender plants. I may have to start going back.

Well, that's it from the farmers market. I'll start a new post, since its picture heavy from my trip to one of my favorite grocery stores.

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Well, it appears that the photos are only having an issue on my laptop, since I went to check on our other computer and they all appear to be up there. I need a break, see you in a bit.

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heidih   

Totally enjoying your blog. Wonderful photos. Adorable beasts. I have a male yellow lab who looks alot like yours- he is such a foodie- roasted asparagus, cantaloupe, quality apples, carrots, and currently in love with Asian pears- but they have to be peeled and please do not include any core.

The cardoni- cardoon- looks like an artichoke but the flowers are very small and not edible, the stems are harvested and have a mild artichoke flavor when properly cooked. They are usually blanched in the growing process like celery - tied to keep them white & to make them more tender. They are very bitter. I have cut them raw from the garden and accidentally gotten juice on my finger, then eaten something. The bitter rests on your palate a long time. Most recipes pre-cook them to get rid of some of the bitter. Chardgirl has a potato- cardoon gratin in RecipeGullet that is a standard prep. The ones you have look kinda tired and I think they are better harvested in cooler weather. I would ask the gentleman who sold them how they are preparing the type you purchased. Thank you again and looking forward to more.

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Totally enjoying your blog. Wonderful photos. Adorable beasts. I have a male yellow lab who looks alot like yours- he is such a foodie- roasted asparagus, cantaloupe, quality apples, carrots, and currently in love with Asian pears- but they have to be peeled and please do not include any core.

The cardoni- cardoon- looks like an artichoke but the flowers are very small and not edible, the stems are harvested and have a mild artichoke flavor when properly cooked. They are usually blanched in the growing process like celery - tied to keep them white & to make them more tender. They are very bitter. I have cut them raw from the garden and accidentally gotten juice on my finger, then eaten something. The bitter rests on your palate a long time. Most recipes pre-cook them to get rid of some of the bitter. Chardgirl has a potato- cardoon gratin in RecipeGullet that is a standard prep. The ones you have look kinda tired and I think they are better harvested in cooler weather. I would ask the gentleman who sold them how they are preparing the type you purchased. Thank you again and looking forward to more.

Thank you for the message. Labs are great dogs, aren't they? Mine isn't the smartest lab in the world, but she is pretty (IMO) My exboyfriend had a black lab named Willie and he and Riley were the best of friends. Willie lived with me for a while, and he taught Riley how to jump up and pick peaches off the tree in the backyard. They'd both sit in the back yard munching on peaches. The pits were really small, and Willie swallowed them, you'd see them out the other end. Riley wouldn't eat the pits. Since that relationship ended, Riley hasn't wanted a peach ever again. I would buy him some and give it to him, but he couldn't be bothered. I guess the memory of his old friend was to sad for him to continue eating peaches.

I did take the cardoon down with me last night to the bar, since I knew that Hugo, my Italian friend would be there to show me how to peel it. In his opinion, that one he said was very tender, and he almost wanted to take it home. He's going to go to Corti Brothers today and buy what they had left. I did taste it (a teeny piece) raw last night, and it almost tasted like celery. Like you said, you want them white, he said. We'll give it a try tonight and see how we like it. Mark is not a fan of artichokes, so we'll see if he likes it.

edited to add the cardoon information


Edited by lucylou95816 (log)

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I love those cat pictures! I love cats that love each other, even though it looks like Peabody is suckling Pickles...which is a wee bit weird... It makes me miss my cat even more! But I wish she were as affectionate as your furballs.

Your TG dinner looked amazing. I didn't get a TG dinner this year--either a Canadian or an American one. It's good to see that one can eat well, even on Atkins. :smile:

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well, I have tonight's dinner, we just need more time to post. it's been a total pleasure....with great food and great winel

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Lucy, this has been a fabulous blog. Lots of lovely pictures, some great tips on wines I'll never find in Pennsylvania, I suspect, and adorable pet photos. Glad to hear that Atkins, loosely interpreted, is working for you.

Thanks a bunch for sharing your week with us!

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Lucy - that vegetable is the chayote or sayote as we call it in the Philippines. We usually use it in stir-frys and sometimes as a substitute for green papaya in a chicken soup dish called tinola.

The fruit is roughly pear shaped, somewhat flattened and with coarse wrinkles, ranging from 10 to 20 cm in length. It has a thin green skin fused with the white flesh, and a single large flattened pip. The flesh has a fairly bland taste, and a texture described as a cross between a potato and a cucumber. Although generally discarded, the seed has a nutty flavour and may be eaten as part of the fruit. (Wiki)

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Marigene   

Lucy, thanks for taking the time to dazzle us with the amazing blog during such a busy time of year; it was most enjoyable. I loved all the photos of your adorable pets, wine, Thanksgiving meal, amazing farmers market and grocery. I wish there was something even close to that in my area. Thank you, again for sharing! :wub:

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I love those cat pictures!  I love cats that love each other, even though it looks like Peabody is suckling Pickles...which is a wee bit weird...  It makes me miss my cat even more!  But I wish she were as affectionate as your furballs.

Your TG dinner looked amazing.  I didn't get a TG dinner this year--either a Canadian or an American one.  It's good to see that one can eat well, even on Atkins. :smile:

I think that Peabody likes to warm his head in Mr. Pickles big belly. :raz: These two defintely love each other. They chase each other around and play rough, but then they snuggle with each other.

Thanks for the message, yes, as far as Atkins, we're back on the horse, so to speak, eating the right way. I think I said that after this week, all the wine, that I am not weighing myself until Friday. It will be nice to see a little loss then.

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Lucy, this has been a fabulous blog.  Lots of lovely pictures, some great tips on wines I'll never find in Pennsylvania, I suspect, and adorable pet photos.  Glad to hear that Atkins, loosely interpreted, is working for you.

Thanks a bunch for sharing your week with us!

Thanks Sandy, I appreciate the message. Unless you are one of those states that they don't allow wine to be shipped to, I am sure any of those places would be happy to ship to you. :biggrin:

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Lucy - that vegetable is the chayote or sayote as we call it in the Philippines. We usually use it in stir-frys and sometimes as a substitute for green papaya in a chicken soup dish called tinola.

The fruit is roughly pear shaped, somewhat flattened and with coarse wrinkles, ranging from 10 to 20 cm in length. It has a thin green skin fused with the white flesh, and a single large flattened pip. The flesh has a fairly bland taste, and a texture described as a cross between a potato and a cucumber. Although generally discarded, the seed has a nutty flavour and may be eaten as part of the fruit.  (Wiki)

Thanks! I appreciate the information. I was suspecting that is what they might be, but I couldn't tell for sure. I wonder if it has alot of carbs?

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