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lucylou95816

Foodblog: Lucylou95816

116 posts in this topic

So the chili that Mark made today was damn good, if I do say so myself. Tons of peppers, hamburger meat, sausage, no beans, I don't really care for them at all. Luckily he doesn't care about that. Here is a picture of the ingredients that he used:

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Here's the simmering pot. He was very thoughtful of my friend who doesn't care for the super duper spicy chili, and had a smaller pot just for her.

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Here's my bowl all dolled up, I happen to like avocado on my chili, so I hope that's not too weird for some of you:

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After watching our show, my friend left, Mark and I took stock in what our day is going to be like tomorrow...we are going to take you on a tour down to Lodi for some wine tasting, so we decided that we better make our pumpkin cheesecake for Thanksgiving, so it can sit in the fridge for a good day. So far it's looking pretty good. I'll post pics when its done. This is a low carbish cheesecake. I did make a graham cracker crust, but probably only used 3 or 4 crackers total for the whole thing. The sugar was replaced with splenda and everything else is legal. The batter tasted okay, so we'll see if it goes over great or fails miserably. I am also making something that may or may not work. Crackers out of sunflower seeds. I have this product called Thick and Thin, Not Starch that had a recipe for mixing ground up nuts with some of this stuff and water. Spread it out in a pan, bake at 400 until set and then 300 until crips. Never tried it before, giving it whirl right now, we'll see it how it goes. Thought it would be good to have with some cheese tomorrow while drinking wine as a snack.

Anyway, I think that I am signing off for tonight, I hope everyone's day went well. I see a pillow in my future.

I also forgot to mention, that I am very excited to have the next 5 days off.

See ya in the morning!

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That's a beautiful array of chiles. On top of all the fresh and ground chiles, Mark used two whole habaneros? I gotta say WOW!

Can you give us a run down of all the chiles - I think I see jalapenos, cayennes and a chipotle but I can't be sure. Would be interested in the recipe if you care to share.

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That's a beautiful array of chiles. On top of all the fresh and ground chiles, Mark used two whole habaneros? I gotta say WOW!

Can you give us a run down of all the chiles - I think I see jalapenos, cayennes and a chipotle but I can't be sure. Would be interested in the recipe if you care to share.

Thanks for the message! I think that the habaneros are pickled habaneros that he found in the cupboard. There are jalapenos, pasillas, dried chili, The large dried one I'll need to check on, the red one in the middle is a jalapeno. Basically we brown up ground meat and Italian sausage (one mild and one hot). Then saute onions and the fresh peppers, although he puts in some of the jalapenos later on for a more crunchy flavor. Dump all that into a big pot, add the tomatoes, these boxed kind seem to be very low in carbs, beef broth and spices. Usually we use chili powder (we have several types here), oregano, cumin, salt and pepper. The spices are just to taste. Let it all hang out and then eat. Very good. If you need anything more specific let me know.

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Good Morning. It was nice to get a good night's sleep. Our gameplan today is that we are heading out for some breakfast, and then wine tasting in Lodi. I'll get some pictures to share the day with you. The weather is beautiful today, bright blue skies, a perfect day for this sort of thing. It's a little cold out, but hey it's November in California. See you all when we get back.

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I'll be really interested in what you have to say about Lodi wines. The place is so doggoned hot in the summer, I have trouble imagining them producing anything better than cheapo-jug wines, like what Gallo made when I was growing up. If the wineries you tour today have anything to say about special considerations for summer heat, I hope you'll include that information.

I'm looking forward to your photos. Blue valley skies can be a wonderful thing, especially if you have to contrast them with the usual Valley tule fog. Have you had much of that yet? There was a humdinger in Fresno a couple of weeks back.

Your food photos are wonderful. I commend the designer on the layout of the raw ingredients! Oh, and avocado on chili looks like a fine idea. :biggrin:


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I'll be really interested in what you have to say about Lodi wines.  The place is so doggoned hot in the summer, I have trouble imagining them producing anything better than cheapo-jug wines, like what Gallo made when I was growing up.  If the wineries you tour today have anything to say about special considerations for summer heat, I hope you'll include that information.

I'm looking forward to your photos.  Blue valley skies can be a wonderful thing, especially if you have to contrast them with the usual Valley tule fog.  Have you had much of that yet?  There was a humdinger in Fresno a couple of weeks back.

Your food photos are wonderful.  I commend the designer on the layout of the raw ingredients!  Oh, and avocado on chili looks like a fine idea.  :biggrin:

I'll be sure to ask how the heat affects the grapes. We're actually going to have a special tour with a guy who is a winemaker who seems like he's got a great thing going. I'll post the link to his place when I put up the pictures. The fog hasn't been too bad, we had some this past weekend, in the evening and a little in the morning. The weather sure hasn't been indicative of years past. Mark will appreciate your comment on laying out the food, that is his specialty. Be right back with some breakfast photos.

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So we just got back from breakfast. We figured we go to The Fox and Goose Public House today, since the weekends are just crazy. Well, today was crazy as well. Parking downtown Sacramento, especially on a weekday just sucks, and that coupled with hungry and angry meter maids, well you either hike a long way or pay a big ticket. We met Mark's sister Kara and his neice Sophie for breakfast today. So let us introduce you to the Fox and Goose:

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This place is a British style pub with lots of ales on tap. Sometimes for breakfast here, you may see a Senator or someone of equal importance, since its pretty close to the Capital. I didn't notice anyone "famous" today, but then I am not a big political guru either.

Here's the main dining room:

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Take a quick look at the menu, I already know what I am going to have:

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The Benedict Arnold please, no muffin and tomatoes. It's the welsh rarebit sauce that I really want. It's so good, and I know low carb friendly since the owners of the Fox and Goose were at the Club Raven one time (we were there earlier this week) and I was able to inquire.

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Yes, that is a big mound of potatoes but I only had one or two bites and they weren't that good really..kinda dry. Which is why Kara recommends this:

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Which I guess they slather the potatoes with chilis, cheese and sour cream. I guess they call it potato deluxe. I've never heard of that one before. Still, I was okay without them.

Here's Mark's breakfast, he got the same thing as me, but had canadian bacon and he even ate 1/2 of one english muffin.

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A good start to the day. I also figured that I better introduce Riley, so he doesn't feel like he isn't loved:

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He is a cocker spaniel/dauchsand mix. He'll be 11 this Sunday. We usually have the top of his hair in a mohawk, but the last the time he went to the groomers, they didn't do a very good job at it. I also don't usually advocate clothes for dogs, but since I get him groomed every few months, he gets a little shivery during the cold days.

Here is also another picture of Lucy:

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Okay, we're waiting on Kara to come over and then we head to Lodi. See you when we get back.

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This is so much fun to see a local blog. I haven't been inside the Raven in years.

Good blog and good work with the Atkins.

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This is so much fun to see a local blog.  I haven't been inside the Raven in years.

Good blog and good work with the Atkins.

That's funny! Who do you know from the Raven, in terms of bartenders? Jimmy? Greg? You must know Joey, the owner. Thanks!

Riley is very handsome. I'm the mom of two dachsunds and I know they can get very testy!!    I've never seen a dachsund/cocker mix though, he's adorable.

Keep up the good work!!

Thank you. Riley is in need of a haircut, but he's still cute all the same. Thanks for reading!


Edited by lucylou95816 (log)

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This is a really timely blog for me as I've just started low carbing again. Great job so far!

I'm really interested in hearing more about those Revolution Rolls. I've seen the recipe before but never quite believed they could work. Since you seem to make them regularly, do you have any tips for making them?

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This is a really timely blog for me as I've just started low carbing again. Great job so far!

I'm really interested in hearing more about those Revolution Rolls. I've seen the recipe before but never quite believed they could work. Since you seem to make them regularly, do you have any tips for making them?

Thanks for the message. Good luck on your new venture to low carb. Trust me, if I can do it, ANYONE can do it. As for the revolution rolls, here's a recipe, even though you may not need one: recipe. As for any tips, when I make them, I make sure everything is room temperature. I really make sure the egg whites get really stiff and then fold in the other ingredients. Bake them until just browned. I then put them in a ziplock after they have cooled and then in the fridge. When I want to eat one, I put them in the oven (I have a toast option on my oven), toast it and then put butter, splenda and cinnamon. They aren't bread....but they are a good quick breakfast, at least for me. Good luck again, and if you need any other special recipes, be sure to ask, we may have something that will work.

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I have a few questions for you...

* Is Mark a Gemini? I only ask because his chili ingredient layout was so symmetrical. :laugh:

* What street is the Philly cheesesteak place on?

Riley sent me some doggy ESP messages; he thinks he looks quite dapper in his smoking jacket.

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Hey Everyone,

Just got the pictures loaded from Lodi. There are a lot, so kick back, get a glass of wine (It's not a work day for most tomorrow) and enjoy. As I post, I decided I needed a beverage to enjoy and here it is, one of our purchases from today:

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It even got a Peabody two paws up

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I will touch more on this wine later.

We started off at Jewel Winery

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Here we met Rustin, who is the Tasting Room Assistant Manager and Sam Whitmore (who we'll talk about in a minute), the Head Guru. Apparently, Jewel is one of the oldest wineries in Lodi, in fact, their main building that does alot of the magic is from 1901

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This other building next to it used to be a distillery, but its not operational anymore. Sam said that at one time, brandys and other spirits were made there.

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We spent some time in their tasting room, and Rustin talking us into the their wine club, which honestly can't be beat...6 times a year, $15 each time, you get one of their "library" wines and one of their everyday wines. The library wines are in the $25-39 range. Not a bad deal. I couldn't resist and signed up for their "gold club" where you get 6 bottles every 2 months for $43.98 plus tax and $10 shipping. Check out their site above for more information.

After that, Sam then took us on a tour, but not with out his faithful friend, Iggy.

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Iggy is a rescue dog who Sam found and seems to have no problem hanging out with riff raff like ourselves

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Sam, not only is the GM at Jewel, but a few years ago, decided to take on his own project and label. It's Whitmore Wine Company. One of the things that I really liked about Sam's new wines is not only the fun catchy names, but the fact that he supports children and animal charities. That alone gives him an A+ in my book.

After talking with Sam for a while, you can totally tell the passion that he has for making good wine. He's really looked into his demo's and knows who he wants to appeal to. I couldn't help but notice that his wine has screw caps

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You can't see them in this picture, but I asked him about that. (We also got our bottles signed by him, which is very cool) He said that most people feel that the romance of a bottle of wine is opening the bottle,(which I totally agree with) in his opinion, the romance is what is in the bottle, and that can be ruined when you smell, for example, "barnyard" because the bottle is corked, and that is not romantic. I guess I can agree with that. He also said that after spending some time in France, that it is conceivable that someday we'll see high end wines in bags or boxes, since they are easier to store, and when you have large families that drink wine, they just make sense.

We also learned some interesting information from Sam and others today, that sort of answer a question from Smithy regarding the state of Lodi grapes. Well, hold on to your glasses, because apparently, some of the wine makers in Napa and Sonoma rely on Lodi to supply their grapes. Lodi growers have just in the last few years started becoming winemakers. Sam had mentioned that the winemakers sometimes have a tough time in Lodi, due to inexperience, and not having enough resources at their hands, so their wines from one year to another can range in consistency. Lodi, as I have known is wonderful for their Zinfandel, but they also have great Cabernet Sauvignon crops and other big reds as well, and not to exlude some whites from the delta areas as well. So when you shell out $60 bucks for a Silver Oak (Which we are planning on opening tomorrow), it could very well be Lodi grapes. Interesting. :blink:

I am going to send Sam the link to this blog, so please, feel free to correct anything I may have inaccurately said.

Here's some more pictures from their cellars and of Sam giving us the lowdown, and some barrel samples that did not suck!

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Lastly, the other thing really cool about this place is their table wine. It's called, "Saturday Red" Here is an article about it. You buy the jug for $4.99 and then can take it to the winery for a refill for $2.99.

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It's pretty damn tasty.

After all this great fun and information, we headed off to Vino Piazza. Watch the video, it's quick and gives you a good feel of what this place is. First here are some landscape pictures, of what a beautiful day it was:

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This is right across the street.

gallery_45680_5396_41982.jpg another across the street.

Here are some shots of the buildings themselves. We only found 3-4 wineries open today, which worked out fine, we needed to get home safely. :wink:

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Unfortunately, today was almost like a ghost town. Kara, Mark's sister who came with us has been there before when there was a festival, or that kind of thing going on and said it was a lot of fun. We still had fun. We met Gus, who is the wine grower for Stama Winery.

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Gus's family has been growing grapes in Greece for many generations, and he has for the last 22 years in Lodi. For the last two years he's (well, someone else is, but if he doesn't approve, it doesn't get bottled.) started making his own wine, as you saw earlier, it got a Peabody two paws up. We got that Cab for $70/case. Here are a couple more pics of Gus' wine.

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His tasting room

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This building used to house a big winery, as the video earlier said. I thought these pipes would make a cool picture, which in the circle, which was a window, is a shot of the mural on the outside wall, in another room, which in my opinion was very cool.

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One more word about Gus. He was so nice. After being in his tasting room a bit, we decided to have a snack. We brought some cheeses and my "crackers" that were made out of sunflower seeds, thick and thin and water. Kara and Mark seemed to like them, I did if they had the cheese. We brought our "picnic ware" with us and as Gus walked by, he said, "Do you need some wine to go with that?", we say, "sure", so he tells Mark to bring in the glasses and he filled them up with one of his best Cabs. Gus does not suck!

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We also visited gallery_45680_5396_49402.jpg and tasted a few wines. Alot of people were raving about a butterscotch wine. This is the place owned by the guy who started the whole Vino Piazza. Mark took a ton of pictures of the skeletons that were in the video, so I won't post them again here.

After that, it was getting late, we, well some of us (not naming names), were getting buzzed and it was time to go home. We had a great time!

I just finished off a bowl of chili, a glass of wine and we may head over on foot to the Raven for a couple of after dinner cocktails. I hope tonight finds everyone well, and please stay tuned for tomorrow.

Tomorrow's plans. We are going to make a potato/mushroom thing out of Bon Appetit. We will also do some food for a homeless shelter (more info on that later). Then we'll (Mark, Me, Riley and Lucy) head to my dad's house in Martinez, about 1 1/2 hours away for dinner. Everything there will be documented, hopefully Dad has some wireless connection and I can upload tomorrow, if not, Friday when we get back. I can promise, some really good Napa (although maybe Lodi now) wine, good food and who knows what else. Stay tuned.......

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I have a few questions for you...

* Is Mark a Gemini? I only ask because his chili ingredient layout was so symmetrical.  :laugh:

* What street is the Philly cheesesteak place on?

Riley sent me some doggy ESP messages; he thinks he looks quite dapper in his smoking jacket.

Hi Jensen

No, Mark is not a Gemini, he's a Pisces. Not sure what that will reveal. :biggrin:

The Philly cheesesteak place is located on Folsom Blvd near Watt.

Riley has that affect on the ladies. He has many girlfriends :wub:

Thanks for the message!

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Lucy, I am in love with your blog in many ways, and I love how you, like me, debunk the myth that cats and dogs hate each other. I have an autistic son, and I have trained my purebred German Shepherd in the art of Shutzhund, personal protection, which includes my two cats. He loves them, and they love him back.

When they come home from wandering outside, he checks to see if they are ok.

What I wanted to ask was do you do the tuna salad in low carb pita? That kept me on the low carb diet for weeks. I would do the tuna in spring water, mixed with the various pickles, celery, onion, mayo, sometimes olives, with lettuce and tomato.

That would keep me full for hours. It was my jump start into the low carb eating.

Also, I'd be remiss if I did not mention that a huge part of losing weight was because I'm a single mom, owner of my home, and I do all my own, lawn mowing, gardening, snow, shoveling, raking the leaves. I'm in the mid-west Of Ohio.


---------------------------------------

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What a cool tour! I would NOT have guessed that Lodi grapes contribute to some of the Napa or Sonoma wines.

Thanks! - even though I've now got John Fogerty's voice stuck in my head. Again. Oh, Lord. :blink::hmmm:


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Oooohhhhh! I wish you had blogged two summers ago! I was in Stockton for a couple of weeks, and had I known of all the wineries in Lodi, I might have borrowed (or rented) car to take myself there. As it was, I had a very disappointing visit to Napa (it wasn't disappointing because of the wines, but because of my traveling companions, who really weren't all that interested in wine or food).

I hope to see more kitty pictures out there! I was a bit surprised that Lucy doesn't much care for cats. Most lab-types I know get along relatively well with cats, or are at least indifferent to them. (My cat doesn't like any other animals, but she tolerates their presence quite well, and only gets into trouble when provoked.)


Edited by prasantrin (log)

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All the chiles look so beautiful, and the photo looks like a piece of art. I love your loaded up chili. Oh avocados :wub: Hmm never had them on chili but I will now! Lodi, and wine. LOL I posted this without refreshing it from yesterday. :rolleyes: I loved Iggy the rescue dog, and the wines. Funny enough I didn't appreciate wine until I moved away from California. I finally had time to enjoy wine, and I lucked out and moved to the wine region on germany. But I am amazed that are wonderful wineries in Lodi. I will have to check them out the next time I get to california. Thank you so very much. I learn something new everyday!

Edited because I didn't see the rest of the winery post before replying. :rolleyes:


Edited by milgwimper (log)

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The welsh rarebit sauce sounds great. What's in it?

Love the winery pics, and the dogs, and the food.......

Blog on !

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Lucy, I am in love with your blog in many ways, and I love how you, like me, debunk the myth that cats and dogs hate each other. I have an autistic son, and I have trained my purebred German Shepherd in the art of Shutzhund, personal protection, which includes my two cats. He loves them, and they love him back.

When they come home from wandering outside, he checks to see if they are ok.

What I wanted to ask was do you do the tuna salad in low carb pita? That kept me on the low carb diet for weeks. I would do the tuna in spring water, mixed with the various pickles, celery, onion, mayo, sometimes olives, with lettuce and tomato.

That would keep me full for hours. It was my jump start into the low carb eating.

Also, I'd be remiss if I did not mention that  a huge part of losing weight was because I'm a single mom, owner of my home, and I do all my own, lawn mowing, gardening, snow, shoveling, raking the leaves. I'm in the mid-west Of Ohio.

Christine, Thank you for your message. Aren't animals the greatest? They offer such warmth and compassion, and they don't talk back (well usually). I am happy that your son finds such comfort with them. As for tuna, I am not a big fan of tuna, Mark is however and he eats it all the time. I haven't tried low carb pita bread either, for the fear of getting knocked out of ketosis. We bought some low carb tortillas a few weeks back and made fajitas. I was sure to count them in my counts for the day,and bam out of ketosis. I threw those things out. I just find after being on this diet for a while, you usually aren't hungry. It's very interesting how that works. Your activity level certaintly would be an asset to losing weight as well. Sadly, I don't excercise as much as I should, but slightly in my defense, my job is not sendentary. I am walking around all day, carrying things, standing, moving around. It's the not greatest form of excercise, but it's better than sitting in cube all day. Also, at home, we walk alot to different places, since they are all in walking distance. Thanks for the message and have a great Thanksgiving!

What a cool tour!  I would NOT have guessed that Lodi grapes contribute to some of the Napa or Sonoma wines. 

Thanks! - even though I've now got John Fogerty's voice stuck in my head.  Again.  Oh, Lord. :blink:  :hmmm:

I found it really interesting too. I should say that if I remember correctly, Sam said that Sonoma and Napa wineries that produce over 70,000 or 80,000 cases a year, they use some grapes from Lodi. Gus said something like 80% of wineries use Lodi grapes, but he had a really thick accent that sometimes was hard to follow. I did use to have a co-worker who lives in between Galt and Lodi, where her and her husband grew grapes and she said that they sold them to Kendall Jackson, so that also backs up this story. I honestly think that for some places in Napa, that are high end, if they say Napa Valley, I want to say that a certain percentage has to come from that region/appellation. Otherwise they'd really be ripping the consumer off.

I'm sorry about the song..its stuck in my head too. Happy Turkey day!

Oooohhhhh!  I wish you had blogged two summers ago!  I was in Stockton for a couple of weeks, and had I known of all the wineries in Lodi, I might have borrowed (or rented) car to take myself there.  As it was, I had a very disappointing visit to Napa (it wasn't disappointing because of the wines, but because of my traveling companions, who really weren't all that interested in wine or food).

I hope to see more kitty pictures out there!  I was a bit surprised that Lucy doesn't much care for cats.  Most lab-types I know get along relatively well with cats, or are at least indifferent to them.  (My cat doesn't like any other animals, but she tolerates their presence quite well, and only gets into trouble when provoked.)

Prasantrin, Thanks for the message. You were so close. I agree that wine tasting isn't that fun with people that aren't that interested. Kara's husband doesn't drink, so when we do a big all day deal, he'll drive us, which is great, but he seems to always find some kind of fun conversation with people, and doesn't appear to be bored or always ready to leave, which is nice. Saturday, we are toying with the idea of going up to Amador, since we have some futures to pick up, in which case is a whole other area for tasting that is great. The sacrifices for Egullet that we must make. :raz:

More kitty pictures, coming right up....in fact these were taken last night, and I just couldn't resist:

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If I said that Lucy doesn't like the cats, that would be a mistake. Riley at this point is tolerant of them, but could care less about them when we first got them. In fact, Lucy was very protective over them. We have a dog door that goes outside and one day, Lucy was going nuts outside, I went out to see what the problem was, and Peabody had gotten out the doggie door (he was really little then) and she was telling us that he had gotten out. Another day, she kept bugging Mark at the computer and he kept shooing her away, but she kept coming back, again, Peabody got out again. She also used to snuggle up with them too. That is why its so funny that she'll allow Mr. Pickles to stand next to her while she eats, since Riley would get all alpha dog on anyone of them if they got within 3 feet. They are funny that way. Have a great day!

All the chiles look so beautiful, and the photo looks like a piece of art. I love your loaded up chili. Oh avocados :wub: Hmm never had them on chili but I will now! Lodi, and wine. LOL I posted this without refreshing it from yesterday. :rolleyes: I loved Iggy the rescue dog, and the wines. Funny enough I didn't appreciate wine until I moved away from California. I finally had time to enjoy wine,  and I lucked out and moved to the wine region on germany. But I am amazed that are wonderful wineries in Lodi. I will have to check them out the next time I get to california. Thank you so very much. I learn something new everyday!

Edited because I didn't see the rest of the winery post before replying. :rolleyes:

Milgwimper, thank you so much for the message. Like I mentioned above, Saturday, we'll take you to another wine region, the Amador area, which is great with zinfandels that are on 150 year old vines. This was only the second time we've been to Lodi, and it was a great experience.

I just really like the avocado on the chili, can't explain it, but it's great and a couple of years ago, I couldn't stand avocados and now I love them, and they are low carb friendly.

Enjoy your day today.

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The welsh rarebit sauce sounds great. What's in it?

Love the winery pics, and the dogs, and the food.......

Blog on !

Thanks! From what I remember, its cheddar cheese and beer. It's very thick and kind of congealed like, but not totally. I just remember asking them if it had flour and cornstarch and they said no. On their lunch menu, they show serving the sauce with an english muffin. We asked Kara to give that a try sometime and get back to us. Have a great day.

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Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! Just wanted to say hi, I've been busy this morning making some potatoes (today is a cheat day) for tonight and stuffing for a homeless shelter. We got to get on the road, so hopefully I can update with pictures tonight or else it will be tomorrow.

Have a wonderful time with family and friends!

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Thank you, and thank you for the gorgeous pet photos!

I think someone remarked on the prevalence of animal lovers in the eG foodblogs -- cat and/or dog shots are as ubiquitous as the obligatory fridge shot, which I note you have yet to provide *hmph*, and love of food and love of pets do seem to go together.

Your cats and your dogs are all precious!

Now I have to go back to checking on the mashed potatoes and getting the squash casserole ready.


Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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