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Isabel's Cantina

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If so, how are the recipes? I'm mainly interested in the vegetarian, fish, and dessert recipes.

http://www.amazon.com/Isabels-Cantina-Flav...95371904&sr=8-1

I haven't cooked from the cookbook but I have eaten Isabella Cruz's food many times and it's wonderful. Full flavored and simple. If the recipe for Dragon Potatoes or Coconut French Toast are in the cookbook, start there.

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Thanks!


There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

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    • By Bhukhhad
      Breakfast in India vs Breakfast in our homes outside India
      My breakfasts have varied from the time I started to cook for myself instead of just enjoying my Mother’s cooking. At first they were a mix-match of meal fixings, or just dinner leftovers. Or the good old breakfast cereal and milk. But as the years passed and I was more organized, the meals I enjoyed in my Mother’s home began to swim in my memories. And I began to prepare those for my family. However, I am no amazonian chef, so depending on  the hectic nature of the days plans, I switched back and forth from convenience with taste, to elaborate and of course tasty breakfasts. We do have both vegetarian and non vegetarian foods but Indian breakfasts will mostly be vegetarian. 
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      *************
       
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      ****************
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      **************************
       
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