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Vinegars...I have *such* a collection,


Pierogi
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I seem to be a vinegar magnet. I have just about every type of vinegar marketed. Rice wine, balsamic, white balsamic, sherry, Champagne, red wine, white wine, cider, I could go on but I won't. Apparently, I've never met a vinegar I won't buy. Some of them I've purchased for a specific recipe. Some of them because they're...*quote*...staples...*unquote*. Some I bought just 'cause they seemed interesting (anyone for some Mango-Chili flavored vinegar from Trader Joe's?).

The problem is I buy them and they sit on the counter, or in the fridge, or in the pantry, and when I do think to use them, or need to use them for a specific recipe, they've gone musty-tasting, or have a slime plug in them.

I do make salad dressing pretty regularly, and that's what I use the vinegars in most. I'll also drizzle some of the more interesting ones over plain steamed or roasted veggies. But other than that, unless a recipe says HEY, USE VINEGAR ! I never seem to think of them.

What do you all use vinegars for other than the obvious salad dressings?

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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I'm a proud Vinegaholic and wear the badge for all to see (it's on my forehead, if you must know).

I use vinegar on fruit, in soups, in braises, in pan sauces, in marinades, in raw dishes, to pickle with, and even on ice cream! The uses for vinegars go so far beyond salad dressing. You just need to eliminate that imaginary barrier and open yourself up to all the different applications.

An aged balsamic on ice cream or fruit (sparingly, mind you) is glorious. Where would a bearnaise be without vinegar? Obviously pickling revolves around the stuff. Ceviches / sashimi / sushi are welcoming muses. Actually, Asian cuisines in general are big on using vinegar in their cuisines.

My vinegar collection is at least 25 strong.

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Ice Wine Vinegar, Pear Vinegar, Radish Vinegar, Tomato Vinegar, Rice Wine Vinegar, Riesling Vinegar, Meyer Lemon Vinegar, Kumquat Vinegar, and Yuzu Vinegar are.... I suppose, the favourites of my collection. But honestly, I love them all like sour children.

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You're on the right track with salad dressings. Don't forget you can also make some interesting cole slaws with your different vinegars.

Vinegars go great with most pork dishes. Also with sausages, brats, and the like (helps to cut the richness).

Vinegars are a good addition with some bean dishes, too. I always add a liberal splash of vinegar to my mom's Navy Bean soup. :wub:

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I have a bottle of japanese Uchibori Apple Dessert vinegar I was given by the Canadian distributor. I haven't tried it for anything yet.

Any suggestions?

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The thing that few people seem to consider is drinking vinegar.

I don't mean drinking it straight, but try diluting some with water or club soda (I always have a soda siphon filled and ready to go because I use it a lot and also in baking some quick breads).

A dollop of one of the fruit syrups, added to one of the "fruity" or milder vinegars - even a good apple cider vinegar - then charged with soda water, makes a great drink.

Consider that the Roman army routinely drank diluted vinegar because it was safer than water when they were on the march and we all know how successful they were!!

A friend who visited several Balsamic producers around Modena a few years ago, was treated to "sipping" Balsamic that was served in the tiny liquer glasses that are pretty much useless for anything else. (The glasses I mean..)

He brought me a bottle of very old Balsamic that was obviously intended for export because it includes a little booklet printed in both English and Italian.

I finally opened it during the holidays last year and it has extraordinary flavor. I transferred some to a little bottle with a dropper - meant for flavored extracts - and use a few drops at a time. I have to confess that a couple of drops have ended up on my tongue..........

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I love this recipe for Roasted Fig Chicken.

Sometimes I like to use dried apricots, in place of the figs.

Note: the recipe omits 1/4 c. water from the ingredient list.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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The thing that few people seem to consider is drinking vinegar.

I don't mean drinking it straight, but try diluting some with water or club soda (I always have a soda siphon filled and ready to go because I use it a lot and also in baking some quick breads).

A dollop of one of the fruit syrups, added to one of the "fruity" or milder vinegars - even a good apple cider vinegar - then charged with soda water, makes a great drink.

Consider that the Roman army routinely drank diluted vinegar because it was safer than water when they were on the march and we all know how successful they were!!

A friend who visited several Balsamic producers around Modena a few years ago, was treated to "sipping" Balsamic that was served in the tiny liquer glasses that are pretty much useless for anything else. (The glasses I mean..)

He brought me a bottle of very old Balsamic that was obviously intended for export because it includes a little booklet printed in both English and Italian.

I finally opened it during the holidays last year and it has extraordinary flavor.  I transferred some to a little bottle with a dropper - meant for flavored extracts - and use a few drops at a time.  I have to confess that a couple of drops have ended up on my tongue..........

That's a neat idea. I made a blackberry vinegar with the summer blackberries, and I bet that would taste great with club soda.

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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