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Where would you really want to go back to in Paris


John Talbott
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Another recent topic stimulated a follow-up.

So, you've got a limited time left here for any number of reasons (worst - impending death/serious illness/disability/etc.), intermediate - transfered, best - leaving to be the PDG of Baker & McKenzie [inside joke - PM me if you're stuck]) - so where would you eat?

I'll chime in - in a while.

John Talbott

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On a somewhat related note, there's a new book out by Melanie Dunea whith fancy photos called My Last Supper: 50 Great Chefs and Their Final Meals / Portraits, Interviews, and Recipes featuring Featuring: Ferrán Adrià, José Andrés, Dan Barber, Lidia Bastianich, Mario Batali, Rick Bayless, Michelle Bernstein, Daniel Boulud, Anthony Bourdain, Scott Conant, Gary Danko, Hélène Darroze, Alain Ducasse, Wylie Dufresne, Suzanne Goin, Gabrielle Hamilton, Fergus Henderson, Thomas Keller, Giorgio Locatelli, Masa Kobayashi, Nobu, Jamie Oliver, Jacques Pepin, Gordon Ramsay, Michel Richard, Eric Ripert, Marcus Samuelsson, Charlie Trotter, Jean-Georges Vongerichten and more… I haven't seen it yet, but it's been getting a lot of press. The title explains it all. Here's the Amazon link in the U.S.:

http://www.amazon.com/My-Last-Supper-Portr...95082970&sr=8-1

Edited by hughw (log)
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L'Ambroisie would have to be my pick. I would prepare the meal carefully, explain them the situation and build the personal relationship, all to make sure that I have the best possible l'Ambroisie experience. Disappointments there are major letdowns not because they are tragic (like they can be at Gagnaire), but because it is orgasmic when it works, and merely excellent when it doesn't (sometimes good is worse than bad).

In my dreams, I would have l'Ambroisie's food with Savoy's or le Meurice's service and warmth. But short of it, Pacaud rules. Only Passard does as good a food as him, and I find his place offsetting.

If, on top of having to leave Paris, I was on a budget (and then I would really say poor me), then I would go to Luna Rosso in Romainville.

Edited by julot-les-pinceaux (log)
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Sorry. L'As de Falafel permanently confused me..

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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Does it have to be an existing place?

The place I'd really want to go back to does not exist anymore. It is Ecaille et Plume, a small restaurant rue Duvivier, in the 7e. The chef was Marie Naël, who now gives cooking classes, and she was a culinary genius.

Among the existing places... I can't think of one. Le Cambodge, maybe.

Edited by Ptipois (log)
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Everything we know about great food and the art of cooking we learned in France. There was a wonderful bistro called "Au Carillon" on Place Abesses, across from the church. As was typical, the wife handled the cash register, menus and wine service. The husband worked at his large chef's table in the center of the small room. An assistant (never seen) made frites, etc. in a tiny room in the back. I never knew that you could cook almost anything over alcohol burners, provided you had quality copperware. I took copious notes of the chef's dishes as he worked his magic. To this day, I have not experienced simple foods better prepared. One day I was seated next to a black terrier. He (or she) had better table manners than most American children. It turns out that the dog belonged to an elderly gentleman who was a regular and always traveled with his dog. It's not just about the food! What a hoot.

Over time we became recognized as quasi-regulars; a great honor. One year we went back and it was gone. No one in the neighborhood seemed to know anything about it. We still miss Au Carillon........

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Does it have to be an existing place?

No, hey, we make up the rules as we go along, non?

So maybe there should be two categories:

1. Places you'd go back to if they still existed as they did then (and I'll contribute Giradet, Pere Bise, le Barriere de Clichy + Robuchon).

2. Places you'd go back to now if it's the last meal: Again, I'll throw in Ze, Spring + le Bristol - the latter if I could afford and eat it all.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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The place I'd really want to go back to does not exist anymore. It is Ecaille et Plume, a small restaurant rue Duvivier, in the 7e. The chef was Marie Naël, who now gives cooking classes, and she was a culinary genius.

Wow! You always surprise me Pti. My last meal at Ecaille et Plume was years ago about this time of year and I had a lievre royale that was spectacular but on exiting the place the fat globules circulating in my head almost fogged me out and reminded me that my heart vessels would be receiving them too.

Memorable!

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Does it have to be an existing place?

No, hey, we make up the rules as we go along, non?

So maybe there should be two categories:

1. Places you'd go back to if they still existed as they did then (and I'll contribute Giradet, Pere Bise, le Barriere de Clichy + Robuchon).

2. Places you'd go back to now if it's the last meal: Again, I'll throw in Ze, Spring + le Bristol - the latter if I could afford and eat it all.

Among existing places in Paris, Ms. L said that I would choose L'Astrance or the Bristol and for extinct places perhaps the Duquesnoy on rue Bosquet. Expanding to the whole of France, I would probably choose Les Crayeres under Boyer, but Troisgros and Roellinger ignite warm memories as well.

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Another recent topic stimulated a follow-up.

So, you've got a limited time left here for any number of reasons (worst - impending death/serious illness/disability/etc.), intermediate - transfered, best - leaving to be the PDG of Baker & McKenzie [inside joke - PM me if you're stuck]) - so where would you eat?

I'll chime in - in a while.

For the past 25 years, with good friends at Moissonnier. Pierre Gagnaire is always a must.

Edited by Pork Belly (log)
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When I return to Paris, I will almost definitely plan a return to L'Astrance. I would like to return to Pierre Gagnaire simply to give it a second chance as I was disappointed with my meal the first time despite its obvious skill and potential. As for returning to a meal from the past, I would love to return to L'epi Dupin from 1999. Of course, when I return to Paris there are simply too many places that I want to go to (including Spring) that it would be difficult to return anywhere!

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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For places that are no more, and sticking to Paris, I would say Tante Jeanne and Guichard's Jamin. Also a little Sud Ouest bistrot on the avenue des Ternes which made the best confit ever.

For the last meal, I stick with l'Ambroisie, all the more since it is an almost religious experience. I would have to find (pick?) the twelve others, though ;-)

Edited by julot-les-pinceaux (log)
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