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Translations/Descriptions of Arabic Dishes


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Hi-

I have lived in the Middle East (Beirut, Damascus) and worked and traveled throughout the region. I speak pretty decent Arabic and know a good deal about Arabic cuisine. I've been going back through some notes and recipes and doing some research about Levantine dishes, and found several scribbled notes of mine with names of dishes I do not know or don't remember. I was hoping someone could tell me what these terms mean or describe them or refer me to recipes:

Kibbe Orfalieh- some kind of raw kibbe, but what are its components?

Subaydij- some kind of mukabilat/mezze?

Arayess - grilled meat stuffed bread- how is this made??

Snassel/Snansel- ?

Toshka- ?

Rakakat- fillo stuffed pastries, how are they different from borek?

The following kebabs, what are their seasonings, differences?

Kebab Istambouli, Kebab Orfali, Kebab Anatakly

Goss- some kind of Iraqi meat dish?

Pacha/Bacha- another iraqi dish?

Many, many thanks for any information you can share!!

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Hi-

I have lived in the Middle East (Beirut, Damascus) and worked and traveled throughout the region. I speak pretty decent Arabic and know a good deal about Arabic cuisine. I've been going back through some notes and recipes and doing some research about Levantine dishes, and found several scribbled notes of mine with names of dishes I do not know or don't remember. I was hoping someone could tell me what these terms mean or describe them or refer me to recipes:

Kibbe Orfalieh- some kind of raw kibbe, but what are its components?

Refered to (Ur-Urfa-Turkey-ex Iraq/Syria). Kibbe in a deep broth of tomatoes and onions.

Subaydij- some kind of mukabilat/mezze?

Sabidej = Syrian name for Squid (Rings)

Arayess - grilled meat stuffed bread- how is this made??

Arayess-Lebanon. It is the same Lamb meat mince for Kofta with the appropriate condiments.

The meat is spread in a medium/small size Arabic flat bread, brush the bread on both sides with Olive Oil and cook on a coal open fire.

Snassel/Snansel- ?

Sanassel-Lebanon.Spine cord of Lamb

Toshka- ?

Armenian version of Arayess with the addition of white cheese

Rakakat- fillo stuffed pastries, how are they different from borek?

Rkakat-Lebanon. They are the same but with a different name used in the Lebanon.

Rakakat are deep fried, Borek are not always deep fried.

The following kebabs, what are their seasonings, differences?

Kebab Istambouli, Kebab Orfali, Kebab Anatakly

Kebab Istambouli (Istambul-Turkey) add pine kernels.

Kebab Orfali (Urfa-Turkey-ex Iraq/Syria) add tomatoes and peppers

Kebab Anatakly correct to read Antakly (Antakia-Turkey-ex Syria) add Aubergines.

Kebabs are meat on a skewer and in the above context, it is Lamb mince meat.

Most of the variations can be attributed to the Armenian community who mastered the art of preparing Kebabs in a variation of forms. Don't forget if you move up the ladder, you have to look at Armenia, Georgia...etc Shashlik et all.

The following are also on some menus:

Kebab Khaskash add tomatoe sauce

Kebab Halabi add parsley

Kebab Izmirly add cheese

Kebak Antabli add mushrooms

Goss- some kind of Iraqi meat dish?

No Idea

Pacha/Bacha- another iraqi dish?

No Idea

Many, many thanks for any information you can share!!

You're welcome

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Wow, thank you so much for that information! (you seem very knowledgeable, you wouldn't also happen to have a recipe for Sidon's sanioura biscuits, would you ;-))

I remembered last night what arayess was, I like the cheese ones as they remind me of panini.

I love all the kebab variations- kebab halabi is my favorite, except in Syria it also includes a spicy tomato sauce, really delicious. I think it's so interesting how all these little towns have different ingredient associations. And urfa makes sense, like urfa biber, the peppers.

Sanassel- umm, no wonder I never ordered this, is it tasty??

Many thanks again, and if anyone knows about those two Iraqi dishes, please chime in!

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Wow, thank you so much for that information! (you seem very knowledgeable, you wouldn't also happen to have a recipe for Sidon's sanioura biscuits, would you ;-))

Try this:

Flour 350gms

Semolina 50gms

Butter 200gms

Sugar 200gms

Orange blossom and rose water to taste. Very little or not at all.

Do not allow to rest and bake on high 220 and reduce to 180 untill top golden brown

I remembered last night what arayess was, I like the cheese ones as they remind me of panini.

I love all the kebab variations- kebab halabi is my favorite, except in Syria it also includes a spicy tomato sauce, really delicious. I think it's so interesting how all these little towns have different ingredient associations. And urfa makes sense, like urfa biber, the peppers.

Urfa peppers hence the dish.

Sanassel- umm, no wonder I never ordered this, is it tasty??

If you overcome the psy barrier, then it is very tasty. Same method of cooking as Brains. Dress with EVOO/lemon juice/S&P.

You also have the Thalat (kidneys), Sfeen (lungs), Lsanat (Tongue) and finally your friendly Baid Ghanam (Testes). These are traditional Lebanese mezza which are unfortunately being phased out.

Many thanks again, and if anyone knows about those two Iraqi dishes, please chime in!

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Nawal Nasrallah's book, Delights from the Garden of Eden: A Cookbook and a History of the Iraqi Cuisine, describes Pasha as "Head, Tripe and Trotters" of a sheep. She gives detailed descriptions of the meticulous cleaning needed for each of those items before they're boiled along with things like onion, garlic, chickpeas and seasonings. After it's all cooked, the meat is layered in a bowl with bread, broth, chickpeas, dried lime or lemon, and drizzled with yogurt sauce, or oil, or.... (The list goes on, and it sounds like it varies with the cook's preferences.) All in all the finished dish sounds like a fattah, but with those critical sheep parts providing the meat.

Does that sound like the pasha of your notes?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Ah, yes, that does sound like Pasha. Someone once told me when it's made poorly it's awful, but when made in the right hands it is a delight. I've got that book on my Christmas list, and I better get it!

It does indeed sound reminiscent of fette (my favorite dish ever!), and it also reminds me of those old-school fette dishes in Lebanon and Syria that were made with sheep's hoof.

Thanks!

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  • 3 years later...

Pacha (with a p and a ch, as those sounds exists in Iraqi Arabic) is an Iraqi dish with origins in Iran (the Persian dish Kaleh Pacheh), and also exists in Turkey as Kelle Paça, and is also found among the Persian community in Bahrain. It is indeed sheep head and feet (kaleh and pacheh, respectively, in Farsi). In Turkey at least it's one of those 5am I've-been-out-on-the-lash foods.

Guss is simply the Iraqi word for shawarma/döner kebap, and it comes from the Arabic word for cutting (قصّ)

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