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Main Line Prime


Bobby 2 Shakes
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Derek Davis's old-fashioned butcher shop (Main Line Prime) mentioned in Michael Klein's Oct 11 Table Talk just opened. I bought crabcakes there Monday, and prime ground beef, Jamison lamb chops, honey-truffle burrata and lamb sausage Tuesday. I had the lamb chops last night and they were a big hit. I made spectacular cheeseburgers for lunch today, using Hendrick's Farms Cow Pie cheese I also bought at Main Line Prime.

Derek was there Tuesday, Monday I spoke to a cheerful young gentleman named Colin Leary, who seems to be running the place. He told me the Kobe beef is flown in from Japan. They also have duroc pork, serrano ham, organic and free-range chickens, dry-aged beef from Charolais cattle, and veal, as well as organic vegetables, milk, eggs, cheese and specialty items like olive oil.

I asked him about fatback, and he told me they can order anything (including foie) in 24 hours.

The address is

18 Greenfield Ave

Ardmore, PA 19003

P: (610) 645-9500

F: (610) 645-6580

Right now the website is under construction, but you can check it until then here.

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Well this is pretty exciting, I'm checking this out tomorrow. Although there is no Kobe beef (legally) available in the US. There’s actually no Kobe beef (legally) available in the US right now. (There are only four slaughter plants in all of Japan licensed to process the wagyu beef that is imported here: one in Miyazaki, one in Gunma, and two in Kagoshima. None in Kobe.) On the other hand, Kobe is not the most respected designation anyway…

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I happened to drop in last Thursday (the day they opened, as it turned out.) Looked like a nice selection of meats, including bison from Lancaster County (who knew?) Saw the wagyu, but didn't ask where it was from.

The folks there were very friendly and helpful; I didn't buy anything as I wasn't going to be heading home soon. But I'll pick something up one of these days and report back...

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Stopped by this afternoon. A nice looking store. The non-Wagyu beef wasn't really speaking to me; it appeared to be a low grade of Prime, and the dry-aged steaks had some rotting around the edges that should have been trimmed off. The beef is apparently aged 30-35 days.

The Wagyu looked spectacular, I was told it was grade 12 (the highest in terms of marbling). $200/lb. Though I was also told that they're the only place in America where you can get Japanese Kobe beef, and there's even a sign stating this in the store. Not only is there no Kobe at all available in the US, as I've said, but by no stretch of the imagination are they the only place in the US to get Japanese Wagyu. So this is a little distressing.

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Holy crap isn't this what we PA egulleters have been waiting for this whole time? A place to find higher quality meat products?

So since this place is practically in my backyard I had to investigate. I had them slice me two one inch duroc pork loin chops. I also brought home a ball of burrata that I will eat with some ciabatta later this weekend (heh that rhymed). The pork loin was ~$10/lb mark which isn't bad considering how much you'd pay for meat like this in a restaurant.

I cooked the pork to about medium and made a cognac/dried cherry reduction. The meat was excellent. Great flavor, really juicy. It definitely didn't need any brine.

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Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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Thanks Katie. :biggrin:

Hopefully Bobby and I aren't the only two people shopping at MLP. I had the burrata last night and it was delicious. I'd be so sad if this place shut down.

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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  • 4 weeks later...

So I stopped in again and bought more of their delicious pork loin. This time they left the bone in so I got a bit of a bonus to gnaw on after I finished the meat.

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And while I was there, the guys were clearing space to make room for another cooler for deli items I believe.

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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This topic actually forced me to finally do something and become a participating member of eGullet.

I've been getting some great items from Main Line Prime over the past few weeks, too. I picked up some excellent dry aged rib eye steaks for me and prime tenderloin for my husband. They were a real treat. Also, had some of the salmon - very tasty.

Derek also ordered some veal bones for me (25 pounds). Once or twice a year I make up some veal glace de viande (one step past veal demi-glace), cut it up into small squares, wrap separately, and then use them whenever I'm making a sauce. Veal bones have become extremely hard to find and he got them to me in a couple of days. Boy, did the house smell great for a few days. :smile:

I've also tried some of the cheeses he carries and am waiting until I clear out my cheese drawer a bit to buy one that has truffle/honey in it. Also, picked up some salmon filets for dinner tonight. I'm making salmon and Jansson's Temptation potatoes.

His store is very close to me (too close??) so I've been shopping there instead of some of the other shops. Haven't been disappointed yet.

Over the summer I had joined a CSA Farm to City vegetable co-op and had also been going to the farmer's market in Havertown on Wednesday's. The prices at Main Line Prime don't seem out of line. And what he carries is very good. And he has a wide selection.

So, I'm officially hooked! And I agree, sure hope he can keep it going because I am already so spoiled.

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That's pretty ambitous of you Carole. I've gone as far as to roast veal bones and make a nice veal stock, reducing half for demi glace at times but never further than that. As the demi glace is so rich I can't imagine what demi glace de viande would be like. How long do you reduce the demi glace to get this?

Around these parts I am able to source veal bones (mostly necks) at Madrigales on Brstol Road. He tells me he supplies many Philly restos.

Oh, and welcome to EG!

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That's pretty ambitous of you Carole. I've gone as far as to roast veal bones and make a nice veal stock, reducing half for demi glace at times but never further than that. As the demi glace is so rich I can't imagine what demi glace de viande would be like. How long do you reduce the demi glace to get this?

Here's the whole process I use. I first roast the veal bones at 450 for around 1 1/2 hours in two half-sheet pans (around 15 pounds of bones total) and turn them halfway through. Then I add some cut-up carrots and onions (a pound or so of each) and roast another 1/2 hour. Move everything to two 16-quart pots, deglace the sheets, add more water and simmer for a good 10 hours. It usually ends up cooking overnight and I start in the morning so I end up simmering for a lot longer, I think this time it was around 16 - maybe more. Strain it all and put back into one of the pots and boil it down to around 3 quarts or so. Then it goes into the garage to cool overnight so I can remove most of the fat from the top the next day.

Next I boil down by half again to 1 1/2 quarts. That's the demi-glace. Now is the tricky fussy part (and the answer to your question :smile: ). I put the 1 1/2 quarts of demi-glace into the smallest saucepan that will hold it and boil it some more. I'm trying to get all of the water out of it and this stage always takes longer than I think it will and you have to be very very careful at the end so you don't burn it. It ends up looking like when you make caramel, with large bubbles. When they break without letting out steam and it's gotten dark brown (not burnt tho!) you're done. Near the end, I turn it down very low for the last hour or two, until it just bubbles. I think this is what takes me so long, I always very afraid that I'm going to burn it so it takes me longer than it should to get to this last point. Anyway, it ends up being very much like a caramel - same color and thickness. Also the fat totally separates out to the top and can be easily removed with a spoon.

I pour it into a bowl, let it cool, turn out on a cutting board and cut into around 1 1/2" cubes. I wrap these separately with cling wrap, put in a bag and freeze. I don't think you really need to freeze them but it makes me feel better. Then whenever I need a flavor boost, I just pop one or two into the sauce/saute pan and it melts quickly.

Don't forget to boil some water into the saucepan you just used to make the glace de viande, put in your spoons, etc. This makes some great stock all on it's own!

I really think it's worth doing the extra step of making glace de viande. You've already put in all this work so what's a couple of more hours? :smile: It lasts indefinitely, is always on hand, and works miracles. I've found some two years old that was hidden in the freezer and it was fine.

Sorry I ran on so long!

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That's pretty ambitous of you Carole. I've gone as far as to roast veal bones and make a nice veal stock, reducing half for demi glace at times but never further than that. As the demi glace is so rich I can't imagine what demi glace de viande would be like. How long do you reduce the demi glace to get this?

Here's the whole process I use. I first roast the veal bones at 450 for around 1 1/2 hours in two half-sheet pans (around 15 pounds of bones total) and turn them halfway through. Then I add some cut-up carrots and onions (a pound or so of each) and roast another 1/2 hour. Move everything to two 16-quart pots, deglace the sheets, add more water and simmer for a good 10 hours. It usually ends up cooking overnight and I start in the morning so I end up simmering for a lot longer, I think this time it was around 16 - maybe more. Strain it all and put back into one of the pots and boil it down to around 3 quarts or so. Then it goes into the garage to cool overnight so I can remove most of the fat from the top the next day.

I

Nice to know there's a local source for bones. The last time we had a really good meat source was when Marc Prevert was cutting meat and making charcuterie. He started in Ardemore Farmer's Market (old site) and then moved to Havertown. Last I heard he was in Aspen.

One of the things I do with my stock is reduce it in the oven at around 250o F after it comes from the stove. The oven provides a nice even heat that circulates atound the pot. I even do large quantities of soup that way. No burning ever.

Jim

Jim Tarantino

Marinades, Rubs, Brines, Cures, & Glazes

Ten Speed Press

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  • 3 weeks later...

If Harry Ochs gives you exactly what you want, save yourself the trip.

If you've an unmet need, or you just want to try something different, give Main Line Prime a call.

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

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Nobody ever gives me exactly what I want. Maybe they do, but I'll never accept that unless I've exhausted all possibilities.

My pondering here - for me the prime rib is the ultimate cut of beef, with its deckle being the ultimate section of the ultimate cut. Harry Ochs is my usual source. But if Main Line Prime has elevated the local art, perhaps approaching NYC's Lobel's, then it is worth a jaunt to the Main Line.

Just trying to ascertain the primeness of Main Line Prime - great, period, or merely great to have a very good butcher in Ardmore.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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Ah the primeness of Main line Prime.... my experience is that the meat is better than what I have purchased at Harry Ochs and, as a former New Yorker, I think it can approach Lobels. The Jamieson lamb is undoubtedly the best I have had outside of a very fine steakhouse. The dry aged rib steak and strip steaks have been superb. Moreover, Derek stands behind his product. I purchased a dry aged strip right after the store had opened and they were refining the drying process. That particular steak was slightly over aged to my taste. The next time I was in, Derek asked me what I thought of the steak and I told him I thought it was too aged. Without any hesitation, he gave me another at no cost and since then every dry aged steak (and there have been more then a few) has been wonderful and perfectly aged. I cannot comment on the prime rib, but I have now had rack of lamb, duroc pork loin, strip steak and rib eye and everything has been excellent. He also carries breads from metropolitan bakery and local produce and milk among other things. If it is any indication of my enthusiasm, my daughters got me a gift certificate for the holidays. This is exactly the kind of store we should be supporting. Rather than mass produced crap, here we are getting an artisanal product sold by someone who cares. Give it a try.

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Sorry to drop a cowpie into the wunderthread here but after buying a dry aged ribeye (about 21 days) and some filets based on the opinions here, I must say this place does not measure up. Lobels quality? Uh - no way.

The ribeye was not visually appealing and it did not taste any better than Whole Foods meats just a short ways away. If it's prime - it's barely prime. I threw most of it about at $25/lb no less.

The filet was tasty but not much above the supermarket.

Perhaps this is an exciting new venture for locals but, for me, I will continue to pay the small extra cost to have Bryan Flannery send me his unbelievable beef from California.

I am still interested in buying the bison cuts but I don't plan to buy beef there again.

Edited by shacke (log)

Dough can sense fear.

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We had a marbling score 12 (out of 12) Japanese Wagyu steak from Main Line Prime as an appetizer before NYE festivities last night (which was the perfect way to enjoy it, as it's so rich that you can't have more than a few bites).

CSV for 1 hour at 50 C, then given a quick sear.

Outrageously good.

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Edited by dagordon (log)
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Holy smokes dagordon. That looks like a pretty pretty steak. Last one I had was Grade 5 at an LA steakhouse recently. I think I ate 3 oz of the 6 oz steak.

Wish there was a happy medium there between uber-wagyu and what I threw out earlier this week. If there is, I am all ears. Granted its $200 l/b but I think a 4 oz steak would make me queazy.

Dough can sense fear.

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  • 6 months later...

Sweet jesus I love this place. Not only do I consistently get a good product, but they tie a little bow on your meat.

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Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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That looks light years ahead of anything you can get at Harry Och's or Whole Foods. Have they stepped their game up recently or did you just get lucky?

I would kill everyone in this room for a drop of sweet beer...

Homer Simpson

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This was the first time I've bought beef at MLP, but I remember from all of the other times I've visited, that they've always had aged beef in their display. THey still have their duroc pork and I think I saw Berkshire there as well.

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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