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Patriotic dishes around the world


Dianabanana
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Mexico has chiles en nogada, the traditional Independence Day dish containing the colors the mexican flag: poblano chilies (green) stuffed with picadillo, served with a walnut-based cream sauce (white) and topped with pomegranate seeds (red).

Japan has hinomaru bento, meant to resemble the Japanese flag with its bed of rice with a round, red umeboshi plum in the center.

I suppose in the US we have 4th of July cakes decorated with whipped cream, blueberries, and strawberries to resemble our flag, although that doesn't really seem like a "traditional" dish to me for some reason.

Does anyone know of any other patriotic dishes meant to symbolize a country's national flag? I'm looking for traditional dishes specifically meant to be patriotic, not just traditional dishes that happen to incorporate colors of the flag.

Would a caprese salad qualify for Italy? I've often heard people note that it contains the colors of the Italian flag, but I've never heard it spoken about as a patriotic dish in the same way as chiles en nogada or rice with umeboshi.

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Would a caprese salad qualify for Italy? I've often heard people note that it contains the colors of the Italian flag, but I've never heard it spoken about as a patriotic dish in the same way as chiles en nogada or rice with umeboshi.

Spumoni ice cream has the colors of the Italian flag...

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Would a caprese salad qualify for Italy? I've often heard people note that it contains the colors of the Italian flag, but I've never heard it spoken about as a patriotic dish in the same way as chiles en nogada or rice with umeboshi.

Spumoni ice cream has the colors of the Italian flag...

Right! Spumoni--of course!

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Would a caprese salad qualify for Italy? I've often heard people note that it contains the colors of the Italian flag, but I've never heard it spoken about as a patriotic dish in the same way as chiles en nogada or rice with umeboshi.

Spumoni ice cream has the colors of the Italian flag...

Also pizza Margherita...

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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I just came back from the Basque country of France where one cook told me that it's a principle to use the colors of the Basque flag (red, white, and green) in every dish if possible.

It's a lot easier for countries whose flags aren't blue!

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I'm not sure that beet borscht is meant to represent the Polish flag, but it does. Red borscht with white sourcream.

Well, I just asked about this over in a Polish culture forum, and the reply was very interesting. They said that although they have red and white flowers and so forth to express patriotism, there is no particular dish meant to evoke the flag. The part I found surprising was that they don't associate particular colors with holidays, either; e.g., no red and green at Christmas.

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I'm not sure that beet borscht is meant to represent the Polish flag, but it does. Red borscht with white sourcream.

Borshch is probably best known as a Ukrainian dish (where it supposedly originates), although it's popular all over eastern europe. Considering how long the dish has been around, the constant changing of governments and flags in the region, I don't think it's meant to represent anything by it's colour...

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I'm not sure that beet borscht is meant to represent the Polish flag, but it does. Red borscht with white sourcream.

Borshch is probably best known as a Ukrainian dish (where it supposedly originates), although it's popular all over eastern europe. Considering how long the dish has been around, the constant changing of governments and flags in the region, I don't think it's meant to represent anything by it's colour...

Right, its really just coincindental. There are many variations on it too, but I thought I'd make a note of it.

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I guess the first requirement is that the flag be the focus of patriotic feeling - which isn't the case in all countries.

In Japan the "hinomaru bento" was promoted during the war as a way to glamorize austere eating. I doubt you'll see people eating it on national holidays or festivals.

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I'm not sure that beet borscht is meant to represent the Polish flag, but it does. Red borscht with white sourcream.

Borshch is probably best known as a Ukrainian dish (where it supposedly originates), although it's popular all over eastern europe. Considering how long the dish has been around, the constant changing of governments and flags in the region, I don't think it's meant to represent anything by it's colour...

Speaking of Ukraine - in a little twist on the question - a color of the flag represents food. Blue for sky and yellow for wheat.

Nickname: the Breadbasket of Europe.

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