Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Fairy Bread


GlorifiedRice
 Share

Recommended Posts

I recently was made aware of something called Fairy Bread.

Basically its bread with butter and sprinkled with Jimmies or Sprinkles.

Usually its the hard round sprinkles. But I adore it with the soft long jimmies.

Its kids Birthday Party fare in Oz.

Why isnt Fairy Bread in the USA?

Its unfathomable why the Soccer Moms in the USA havent taken Fairy Bread and

expanded upon it and opened Fairy Bread shops, with special breads and Jimmies etc...

Its absolutely gorgeous on a plate, piled high...

Look:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Fairy_Bread.jpg

Come on people lets bring Fairy Bread to the states!

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Growing up in the States, I remember reading about fairy bread! My sister and I were best friends with the girls next door who were the same age. In their garage, they had this Strawberry Shortcake cookbook that described how to make it.....

Alas, we never concocted it. I think the only thing we ever made out of that cookbook were carrot and cucumber curls.

I don't think fairy bread will taste quite right on whole wheat :raz: (that's all I buy these days). But it sure is purty.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok I used to butter my Kraft cheese and eat that cold with no bread, and I still eat frosting out of the can with a spoon,

but somehow sprinkles and butter just doesnt do it for me :wink:

t

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, we had buttered bread with cinnamon and sugar when we were little. Maybe that's the US version.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This reminds me of something I see in my dutch catalogs for my store. Maybe this exactly what you're talking about. The Dutch Store has a whole bunch of different toppings. What's not appealing to me about these is the white bread. I would much rather have them on a wheat bread.

EDITED TO FIX LINK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was given this as a child for my afternoon tea (with the crusts cut off) but I was raised in a household dominated by Brits. The fruited cakes and the more interesting pastries were considered too rich or too stimulating for a child's stomach.

As I recall I turned the age corner when I was about eight and allowed to have more "adult" foods.

I loved fairy cakes.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a Dutch friend in high school who brought what he called "chocolate sandwiches" for lunch. Sometimes he'd give me a bite (he was a good friend, what can I say??). They were ordinary white sandwich bread spread thinly with butter and then topped with either a mixture of dark and white chocolate flakes (which were specially purchased and shipped from the homeland) or what I grew up calling "chocolate sprinkles" (which were also specially purchased and shipped from the homeland, and which had a more genuine chocolate flavor than the waxy version I knew from ice cream parlors). The chocolate was then topped with another buttered piece of bread to make a portable sandwich for the lunchbox.

I loved these things and wished we Americans grew up on such delights. Chocolate sandwiches? Sign me up!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, we had buttered bread with cinnamon and sugar when we were little. Maybe that's the US version.

Or Canadian. :biggrin: Our bread was toasted first, then the buttered , and cinnamon and sugar sprinkled on top. My parents used to call it "special toast" :blink:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OHHHHH,  Y'ALLLLL!!!! :wub:  :wub:  :wub:

May I offer a beverage?

Fairy tea! :wub: I'd think would be perfect with Fairy bread!

Edited by Marlene (log)

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a Dutch friend in high school who brought what he called "chocolate sandwiches" for lunch. Sometimes he'd give me a bite (he was a good friend, what can I say??). They were ordinary white sandwich bread spread thinly with butter and then topped with either a mixture of dark and white chocolate flakes (which were specially purchased and shipped from the homeland) or what I grew up calling "chocolate sprinkles" (which were also specially purchased and shipped from the homeland, and which had a more genuine chocolate flavor than the waxy version I knew from ice cream parlors). The chocolate was then topped with another buttered piece of bread to make a portable sandwich for the lunchbox.

I loved these things and wished we Americans grew up on such delights. Chocolate sandwiches? Sign me up!

My English step sister used to butter a piece of white bread and then spread it with Hershey's syrup. I thought at the time that this was gross (I was four years younger than her). This was before I had tried pan du chocolat :wub: ! I'll give fairy bread a try (as an inveterate Anglophile and Fairyphile, I am obligated), but I am kind of a mind with Dianabanana. Somehow the idea of the sprinkles with the soft bread against my teeth gives me the heebeejeebees. I love them on cookies, but even as a kid didn't sneak handfuls of them while decorating Xmas cookies.

Kim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OHHHHH,  Y'ALLLLL!!!! :wub:  :wub:  :wub:

May I offer a beverage?

Fairy tea! :wub: I'd think would be perfect with Fairy bread!

Awwww, you remembered!!! I have two more little girls now to have Fairy Tea with, and a tiny boy who will surely enjoy it, as well.

And Cambric---oh, yes. That's the sip of the day at a lot of tables.

And chocolate sandwiches---I've asked this before, but I'd like to remember where I saw it. A child remembered that a sedate, demure teacher brought a baguette to school every day, split and filled with bits of chocolate, and wrapped in waxed paper. She would sit on it all morning, and by lunchtime, her ladylike behind had heated and smushed that sandwich into a warm, chocolatey delight, the envy of all the children with bread-and-butter lunches. Anybody remember who wrote that, or what story I'm remembering?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And chocolate sandwiches---I've asked this before, but I'd like to remember where I saw it.  A child remembered that a sedate, demure teacher brought a baguette to school every day, split and filled with bits of chocolate, and wrapped in waxed paper.  She would sit on it all morning, and by lunchtime, her ladylike behind had heated and smushed that sandwich into a warm, chocolatey delight, the envy of all the children with bread-and-butter lunches.  Anybody remember who wrote that, or what story I'm remembering?

This has been driving me nuts since I read you post this morning. It is a strong memory for me- evocative of the flight attendant who told me to warm up the baby bottle by placing it down my top... It is from Time Life Foods of the World volume entitled The Cooking of Provincial France by M.F.K. Fisher. See top of page 11 regarding the elderly music teacher.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And chocolate sandwiches---I've asked this before, but I'd like to remember where I saw it.  A child remembered that a sedate, demure teacher brought a baguette to school every day, split and filled with bits of chocolate, and wrapped in waxed paper.  She would sit on it all morning, and by lunchtime, her ladylike behind had heated and smushed that sandwich into a warm, chocolatey delight, the envy of all the children with bread-and-butter lunches.  Anybody remember who wrote that, or what story I'm remembering?

This has been driving me nuts since I read you post this morning. It is a strong memory for me- evocative of the flight attendant who told me to warm up the baby bottle by placing it down my top... It is from Time Life Foods of the World volume entitled The Cooking of Provincial France by M.F.K. Fisher. See top of page 11 regarding the elderly music teacher.

Oh my gosh, I have this book and I'd never read that part before....how cute is that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You FOUND it!!! I almost went wading through all my Fishers, because it sounded JUST LIKE HER. I knew better than to try right now, because I flip through, find a favorite section, and just dive in, to emerge hours later, dishes undone, and some faint recollection that dinner needs starting.

This is SO cool---I HAD that particular book, the TLFOW one, but sent it to Daniel with several Southern-style cookbooks in a flurry of housecleaning sometime last year. I just love it when a memory triggers a nice remembrance for someone else as well.

It's almost as good as sitting down to tea together. :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...