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Rome Restaurants: Reviews & Recommendations


mogsob
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Since this excellent, perceptive, and detailed report is likely to be downloaded and passed around for years to come, I think it's worth commenting on some of the content. I recommend reading Gypsy Boy's last paragraph first, about feeling that he missed something. He did great, but a Roman palate isn't built in a day either, and he'll do better next time. He has grasped some important concepts, notably that fewer ingredients are often better.

A few specifics, not in order:

- arista is loin of pork, maiale is pork, nothing to do with beef

- Piperno is not "one of the best" restaurants in the Ghetto; it is THE best of the restaurants in Rome serving the traditional Roman Jewish dishes. Second best would be Paris, in Trastevere (the owners used to work at Piperno).

- Pasta, saltimbocca, and puntarelle IS a full meal.

- In Rome puntarelle are not "usually" served as a salad with an anchovy vinaigrette, they are ALWAYS served, cut in the special way (a dying art), as a salad with an anchovy-garlic-oil dressing, sometimes with vinegar, sometimes not, depending on the taste of whoever is making it.

- The season of artichokes: the carciofi romaneschi globe artichokes begin to appear in February and disappear with the first warm weather of late spring. At the moment Rome is full of artichokes from warmer parts of Italy, such as Puglia.

- Pizza bianca is not an ambiguous term in Rome. You cannot consult a book about Naples to find the meaning of a term in Rome. Pizza bianca in Rome is a flatbread, about six feet long, brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with salt. It is sold by the slice to be eaten straight, wrapped in paper, or is split horizontally to make a sandwich. In early summer the sandwich contains prosciutto and fresh, peeled figs.

- Pizza al taglio, rectangular and made in a pan, is not the "usual" way pizza is sold. It's a very important local kind of pizza sold from small shops in the day time. Pizza tonda (round pizza stuck directly in the oven with a pizza peel) is served at tables in the evening. Sit-down round pizza is creeping onto the lunchtime scene but is not traditional.

- Bruschetta. I'm glad you liked Armando's, but the fact that it met GB's expectations is of no importance. His expectations are influenced by international fashion in this case, not Roman tradition. Like pizza, bruschetta is a generic word (though pizza more so) that covers a lot of ground. If a bruschetta has tomatoes, this is specified in the designation: bruschetta al pomodoro. The tomato is extraneous to the definition of bruschetta, which essentially just means toast. I will grant you that Checchino's bruschetta al pecorino is not exciting, but it is what it claims to be, toasted bread with melted pecorino cheese, and it's quite pleasant.

- I have no explanation for the service at Checchino since I have always found both Mariani brothers to be graciousness itself. However, since it is simply not done to have pasta after soup, it was probably assumed that LDC was indeed not doing it but just talking about the pasta, not actually ordering it. (People who have lived in Rome will understand this syndrome.) I always advise people who insist on bucking tradition to be very clear about what they want, as in Yes, I know it's unusual but it's what I really want. BTW, what was the pasta?

- Bucatini alla gricia. Admittedly I'm not up to date on what the checkered-tablecloth joints are doing, but last time I looked they had never heard of la gricia (or even bucatini) and would in any case never make it with real guanciale and imported pecorino romano. Checchino's is good. It's a simple dish, not for everyone, but it's dish that has something to say about traditional Latian cooking.

- Gnocchi. In Rome practically every traditional place serves gnocchi, potato gnocchi, on Thursdays. This is what people here think of as gnocchi, not the flat gnocchi di semolino, aka gnocchi alla romana. The flat ones are regularly sold in gourmet shops for cooking at home but almost never are they found in trattorias. I will have to find out why. They are not even on the radar of most Romans today.

- wild strawberries in November?

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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Thanks, first of all, for the kind words. I seriously doubt that anyone will be paying heed to my words for more than a few days, if at all, when there are so many knowledgeable, experienced, and generous people posting here.

Thanks, too, for the enlightening set of corrections. I obviously got some things wrong and wish that I had an opportunity to correct the original post. I appreciate the corrections but, inevitably, have some quibbles:

“Piperno is not "one of the best" restaurants in the Ghetto; it is THE best of the restaurants in Rome serving the traditional Roman Jewish dishes.” With all due respect, that’s your opinion. Others may, and do, differ. (And I don’t mean me; based on my research prior to going, I am pretty comfortable suggesting it’s one of the best.)

“Pizza bianca is not an ambiguous term in Rome. You cannot consult a book about Naples to find the meaning of a term in Rome.” Point taken, except that I also specifically refer to David Downie whose book IS on Rome, whose mother is Roman, and who has lived there himself a fair bit. He says, “Anyone who visits a few Roman bakeries soon learns that there are as many ways to make pizza bianca as there are Roman bakers.”

With regard to Checchino, you said that “it is simply not done to have pasta after soup” and that “I always advise people who insist on bucking tradition to be very clear about what they want.” We’re tourists. How are we expected to know what tradition is and isn’t? My research notwithstanding, this little tidbit didn’t come up. If the obvious fact that we were tourists wasn’t tip-off enough, I don’t know what else we ought to have done. If our waiter was uncertain, would it not have been reasonable to expect him to clarify?

As to “wild strawberries in November?” I can only offer the evidence of having had them at Piperno. In addition, although admittedly only in my original LTHForum post, there is a photograph I took of boxes of them for sale in the Campo de'Fiori.

In any event, thank you again for your generous post. It’s precisely because people who have knowledge and experience and are willing to share that we all benefit.

Edited by Gypsy Boy (log)

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le goût de ce qu'elles sont."

Curnonsky (Maurice Edmond Sailland)

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“Pizza bianca is not an ambiguous term in Rome. You cannot consult a book about Naples to find the meaning of a term in Rome.”  Point taken, except that I also specifically refer to David Downie whose book IS on Rome, whose mother is Roman, and who has lived there himself a fair bit.  He says, “Anyone who visits a few Roman bakeries soon learns that there are as many ways to make pizza bianca as there are Roman bakers.”

Downie is being hyperbolic and in any case he is not talking about the definition of pizza bianca but ways to make it. What he illustrates is pizza bianca. Everybody thinks their local bakery is the best. It's an artisanal product and will vary somewhat in taste, texture, and color, but what is meant in Rome by "pizza bianca" is a particular flatbread in its natural state, not something with cheese or other toppings on it.

With regard to Checchino, you said that “it is simply not done to have pasta after soup” and that “I always advise people who insist on bucking tradition to be very clear about what they want.”  We’re tourists.  How are we expected to know what tradition is and isn’t?  My research notwithstanding, this little tidbit didn’t come up.  If the obvious fact that we were tourists wasn’t tip-off enough, I don’t know what else we ought to have done.  If our waiter was uncertain, would it not have been reasonable to expect him to clarify?

I would love to know if you are talking about the owner (tall guy in a suit) or a waiter (white jacket). In any case, you are expected to know about tradition because it is really not that hard to know that the primo piatto is soup OR pasta OR rice. This must have come up in all your research (which, I note with chagrin, did not include anything by Maureen B. Fant or you would probably have known this :sad: ). As for the waiter pursuing the subject, this is Rome. You're on your own. You know things or you don't, but don't expect any help. Now, as I write I realize I'm contradicting myself, because a few days ago I wrote an encomium to Italian waiters and said how much I had learned from their advice and correction, which is also true. But unfortunately the default position in this town is caveat emptor.

As to “wild strawberries in November?” I can only offer the evidence of having had them at Piperno.  In addition, although admittedly only in my original LTHForum post, there is a photograph I took of boxes of them for sale in the Campo de'Fiori.
Yes, but they're from a hothouse. The real ones come out in summer.
In any event, thank you again for your generous post.  It’s precisely because people who have knowledge and experience and are willing to share that we all benefit.

Thank YOU. Next time work on HOW to eat as well as WHERE to eat. You're well on your way to becoming a good gastroroman.

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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  • 2 months later...

Hello,

My husband and I will be spending 10 days in Italy at the beginning of May (Ravello, Sorrento and Rome). Does anyone have recommendations for restaurants? The price is not the object, great food is (although great cheap food would be nice :biggrin:). We prefer to eat where Romans eat, when possible. Thank you for any input.

Lori B

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  • 4 weeks later...

I am heading to Rome and Sorrento at the end of this week (4 nights Rome, 4 nights Sorrento). My eating/drinking plans are roughly as follows:

Rome:

I plan to make dinner my main meal of the day and have provisionally decided on Il Fico, Antico Arco, Colline Emilaine and Uno e Bino. This is my attempt to get a mix of classic tratoria (Il fico, Colline Emilaine), upmarket trattoria (Antico Arco) and inventive Roman (Uno e Bino). Obviously this is driven by my personal preference of what and where I think I would like to eat, and there are endless other inviting options out there. Notably absent is Jewish/Roman and michelin*, for which, if I had time, I would probably have selected Paris and Agato e Romano respectively.

No specific plans for lunch and snacks but I am hoping to get to at least Da Baffetto, Da Michelle, Antico Forno and Volpetti.

Gelato - San Crispino, Giolitti and anywhere else that looks good.

Coffee - Tazza D'oro, Sant'Eustachio and others.

Wine - Cavour 313, Cul de Sac and Palatium.

Sorrento:

Less defined plans but I intend to eat at Il Buco and Da Emilia in Sorrento. I am also considering Don Alfonso up the coast.

In terms of resources (other than the various forums on egullet), Maureen Fant's website (http://www.maureenbfant.com/) is excellent (and has other useful links).

One big caveat to the above is that I have not actually eaten at any of these places yet so please view them as informed suggestions rather than recommendations. Howeverm I will report back before your trip in May.

As always, any comments on my plans and additional/alternative suggestions for others in this forum would be very welcome. In particular, I would be interested in recommendations in Sorrento, Positano, Pompei or Capri (whether for lunch, coffee, gelato, wine etc).

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I am heading to Rome and Sorrento at the end of this week (4 nights Rome, 4 nights Sorrento). My eating/drinking plans are roughly as follows:

Rome:

I plan to make dinner my main meal of the day and have provisionally decided on Il Fico, Antico Arco, Colline Emilaine and Uno e Bino. This is my attempt to get a mix of classic tratoria (Il fico, Colline Emilaine), upmarket trattoria (Antico Arco) and inventive Roman (Uno e Bino). Obviously this is driven by my personal preference of what and where I think I would like to eat, and there are endless other inviting options out there. Notably absent is Jewish/Roman and michelin*, for which, if I had time, I would probably have selected Paris and Agato e Romano respectively.

No specific plans for lunch and snacks but I am hoping to get to at least Da Baffetto, Da Michelle, Antico Forno and Volpetti.

Gelato - San Crispino, Giolitti and anywhere else that looks good.

Coffee - Tazza D'oro, Sant'Eustachio and others.

Wine - Cavour 313, Cul de Sac and Palatium.

Sorrento:

Less defined plans but I intend to eat at Il Buco and Da Emilia in Sorrento. I am also considering Don Alfonso up the coast.

In terms of resources (other than the various forums on egullet), Maureen Fant's website (http://www.maureenbfant.com/) is excellent (and has other useful links).

One big caveat to the above is that I have not actually eaten at any of these places yet so please view them as informed suggestions rather than recommendations. Howeverm I will report back before your trip in May.

As always, any comments on my plans and additional/alternative suggestions for others in this forum would be very welcome. In particular, I would be interested in recommendations in Sorrento, Positano, Pompei or Capri (whether for lunch, coffee, gelato, wine etc).

Thank you for the kind words about my site, which I tend to neglect. Be aware Il Fico emphasizes seafood, so is not a typical trattoria. For that I'd go to Nerone or La Piazzetta, the former more traditional but the latter better. But that's my neighborhood, so that's where I go. Antico Arco, which I like a lot, is a restaurant, not a trat, though it has some variations of traditional dishes. Colline Emiliane is great but has nothing to do with Rome. Monti would be a good upscale trat. Textbook traditional would be Checchino or Paris. Don't miss the food at Palatium, which is superb. I also love Agata e Romeo, and if you asked, Agata would probably make you her matriciana even if it isn't on the menu.

In Pompei, I love Il Principe, which has now added a wine bar that I haven't yet been to. We like Taverna del Capitano better than Don Alfonso, but haven't been to either in a few years.

Edited by Maureen B. Fant (log)

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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I suspected that my attempt to classify those restaurants may be woefully incorrect - I have much to learn! Il Fico is my choice for Sunday night so the options are more limited - I am more than happy to eat good seafood. I was put off Monti by all the hype and a few negatives reviews, but I may give it a try for lunch.

Taverna del Capitano sounds promising - I have just found Kropotkin's favourable review from a visit last year. Do you think it is feasible to travel from/to Sorrento for dinner by taxi as we will not have a car? It does not look that far on a map, but I am conscious that looks can be deceiving (and, in the case of taxis, expensive).

On a more general note (and this should perhaps be a seprate thread), I often struggle with the boundaries of upscale trat and restaurant (as with upscale bistro and restaurant) since in the UK we do not really have these disctinctions (although I suppose, more recently, we have the gastropub/restaurant distinction). Obviously some places are clearly restaurants and some clearly trats even to the layman, but closer to the boundaries what are the key distinctions? Food, atmosphere, history etc. (or a combination of these elements)?

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I suspected that my attempt to classify those restaurants may be woefully incorrect - I have much to learn! Il Fico is my choice for Sunday night so the options are more limited - I am more than happy to eat good seafood. I was put off Monti by all the hype and a few negatives reviews, but I may give it a try for lunch.

The hype, as you call it, is unfortunate. It's a fine place filling the needed middle ground between the true trattoria and something more, which I will try to explain below. Frank Bruni, who ought to be ashamed for not knowing about it while he lived here, used too many superlatives to describe it, with the result that those of us who can walk there from home now have to reserve several days ahead. But it IS good.

Taverna del Capitano sounds promising - I have just found Kropotkin's favourable review from a visit last year. Do you think it is feasible to travel from/to Sorrento for dinner by taxi as we will not have a car? It does not look that far on a map, but I am conscious that looks can be deceiving (and, in the case of taxis, expensive).

I would send the restaurant an e-mail and ask about taxis and water-taxis. It may be a little far from Sorrento, but not much farther, if at all, than Don Alfonso. We have always stayed there. The terrain is hilly and tortuous, distances definitely more than they look on a map.

On a more general note (and this should perhaps be a seprate thread), I often struggle with the boundaries of upscale trat and restaurant (as with upscale bistro and restaurant) since in the UK we do not really have these disctinctions (although I suppose, more recently, we have the gastropub/restaurant distinction). Obviously some places are clearly restaurants and some clearly trats even to the layman, but closer to the boundaries what are the key distinctions? Food, atmosphere, history etc. (or a combination of these elements)?

There is a lot of new stuff happening that is screwing up the old distinctions, but according to the old way of looking at things, the trattoria is usually small, usually family run (and so far this all applies to many Michelin stars too), casual, dedicated to the local cooking, and, the main point, very much like eating at home, if your grandmother does the cooking when you do eat at home. The degree of fanciness ranges from you can practically go in your pajamas to what today is called smart casual. Ristoranti aren't always much fancier but have a less homely style of cooking, as a rule, and make more of a show of service, which again is wide ranging, from a grumpy but professional waiter to the whole team. The distinctions are not sharp or clear and basically it's a case of I know one when I see one. There is lots more to be said on this, but not right now.

(I realize I am making a hash of the quoting feature here, but I simply cannot figure it out. I know this is annoying for other people and I apologize.)

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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My husband and I did a similar trip last May, and we didn't have a bad meal the entire time. The best thing about eating in Rome is that there are tons of casual places where you can order wine or beer, a measure of pizza, a pasta, and maybe a salad, and sit outside at one of the tables on the cobblestone streets that wind around the old place and feel truly transported.

As for Sorrento, may I suggest Mami Camilla's? It's a family-run bed and breakfast and a modest cooking school that makes dinner every night for guests and locals in a family-style setting with four courses. It turns out some of the freshest, simplest, authentic fare around, is heavily focused on what's in season in their own gardens. There's enough fresh fish and homemade pasta to make you swoon.

Sorrento can be quite pricey and overrated because it's so touristy, but we stayed at this B&B for five days, using it as a home base to check out Naples, Positano, Pompeii, etc. We ended up eating there nearly every night because it was that good. We made friends with people from Sweden and Croatia as well as some on holiday from Rome.

I remember it being pretty cheap for a four-course meal and located just a tad to the east of the center of town. An easy walk.

Took the classes, too, and came home with a cookbook full of recipes I make frequently, including one for an appetizer of fried eggplant strips rolled around fresh mozzarella and basil, drizzled with tomato sauce. It never fails to thrill guests, and reminds me of our trip every time I make it.

Here's the website:

http://www.mamicamilla.com/

Have fun!

Eat-Drink-Write-Repeat

The Food Scribe

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Taverna del Capitano sounds promising ... Do you think it is feasible to travel from/to Sorrento for dinner by taxi as we will not have a car? It does not look that far on a map, but I am conscious that looks can be deceiving (and, in the case of taxis, expensive).

I'd say it is is about a 40 minutes drive from Sorrento centre to Marina del Cantone - the local advice was to take the coast road around the Western tip of the peninsula (with views of Capri). Don Alfonso is about 10 minutes nearer, perched on the crest of the hills. As Maureen says, these are slow, winding roads - and, around Sorrento and to the East of the town, they are often grid-locked these days. Either way, this is a hefty taxi fare.

I'd hire a car, go by boat or, best of all, book in for the night. One accomodation and some transport options (from a couple of years ago) reviewed (in a rather clichéd fashion) here; the restaurant also does rooms and is right on the beach.

Edited by Kropotkin (log)
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  • 1 month later...

Has anyone been to Rome lately? I am planning a trip for the first week of June, and I would love some restaurant recs. My husband and I prefer more casual dining with the locals as opposed to fancier restaurants.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The June 2008 UK issue of Condé Nast Traveller magazine offers a list of the ten best places to eat in Rome. Their contributor, Lee Marshall, talks of a revived culinary culture in the city and his ranking, it seems, represents the best of this.

I reproduce it here for your interest (with the request that you don't shoot this messenger)...

1 - Trattoria Monti (Via San Vito, 13a, Monti)

2 - Baby, in the Aldrovandi Palace Hotel (Via Aldrovandi, 15, Parioli)

3 - Il Pagliaccio (Via dei Banchi Vecchi, 129a, Centro Storico - Campo dei Fiori)

4 - La Gatta Mangiona (Via F. Ozanam, 30, Monteverdi Nuovo)

5 - L'Altro Mastai (Via Giraud, 53, Centro Storico)

6 - Antico Arco (Piazzale Aurelio, 7, Gianicolo - Monterverdi Vecchio)

7 - Primo (v. del Pigneto, 46, Prenestina)

8 - La Pergola, in the Cavalieri Hilton (Via Cadlolo, 101, Mote Mario)

9 - Da Felice (v. Mastro Giorgio, 29, Testaccio - v. Marmorata)

10- Palatium - wine bar / deli / restaurant (Via Frattina, 94, Ventro Storico - Spagna)

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The June 2008 UK issue of Condé Nast Traveller magazine offers a list of the ten best places to eat in Rome.  Their contributor, Lee Marshall, talks of a revived culinary culture in the city and his ranking, it seems, represents the best of this. 

I reproduce it here for your interest (with the request that you don't shoot this messenger)...

1 -  Trattoria Monti (Via San Vito, 13a, Monti)

2 -  Baby, in the Aldrovandi Palace Hotel (Via Aldrovandi, 15, Parioli)

3 -  Il Pagliaccio (Via dei Banchi Vecchi, 129a, Centro Storico - Campo dei Fiori)

4 -  La Gatta Mangiona (Via F. Ozanam, 30, Monteverdi Nuovo)

5 -  L'Altro Mastai (Via Giraud, 53, Centro Storico)

6 -  Antico Arco (Piazzale Aurelio, 7, Gianicolo - Monterverdi Vecchio)

7 -  Primo (v. del Pigneto, 46, Prenestina)

8 -  La Pergola, in the Cavalieri Hilton (Via Cadlolo, 101, Mote Mario)

9 -  Da Felice (v. Mastro Giorgio, 29, Testaccio - v. Marmorata)

10- Palatium - wine bar / deli / restaurant (Via Frattina, 94, Ventro Storico - Spagna)

Thanks for the list. I haven't been to nos. 4 and 7, but clearly I should. I have studied Primo's web site and it makes me feel old. Nor have I been to Felice since the big cleanup a couple of years ago. It's the sort of place that hold little appeal for me when I'm off duty since I rarely seek the home-cooking trattoria repertoire when I go out. As for the rest, I just wish there would be a global moratorium on top-ten lists. It is unconscionable to put Monti at the top of a list. It is a very good restaurant, make no mistake, but it shouldn't be made into a pilgrimage destination. The author was evidently seeking a mix of types. Otherwise there's no explanation for including Antico Arco and omitting Agata e Romeo and Il Convivio. Personally I'm finding this so-called culinary revival is more an invasion by a new generation -- to which it would be curmudgeonly to object -- than an actual improvement.

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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  • 2 weeks later...

The fiaschetteria Beltramme on Via della Croce , just off the Piazza di Spagna, may seem nothing special but it is an honest restaurant serving good Roman food at fairly decent prices – not something you can take for granted in this tourist-trap part of town.

Recommendation came from a Roman friend who lunches there regularly because it's near her office.

On Friday night entreés were a good salad caprese and a "carpaccio" of raw mushrooms dressed with olive oil and lemon juice – simple food prepared with good quality ingredients.

We both had fresh tuna, simply fried with little ornamentation. Wine from a short list was a bottle of decent pinot grigio. The whole meal cost under €60.

This is a very simple place and is totally authentic – it's been run by Cesaretto for years and unlikely to change before he hangs up his boots. No reservations and you are likely to have to share your table – at lunch time with Italian office workers, in the evening with tourists. Not a destination restaurant but if you're in this slightly overheated area, it's a good choice and nobody will rush you.

Edited by kerriar (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

My partner and I are spending ten days in Rome (Oct 9-19) – first time there for the both of us. Needless to say I can’t wait to arrive. Yet I am on the verge of nervous breakdown trying to pick restaurants. Right now, I’m focusing only on dinner – I figure once I know where we’re having dinner, it’ll be a lot easier to pick out lunch.

If it helps, here’s some background: we’re staying in an apartment, just north of il Colosseo, but we’re happy to walk/bus/cab anywhere; we’re not big fans of offal (sorry if that impugns our foodie cred) but are pretty flexible otherwise – pasta and risotto are highest on our list, with salumi, pizza and fish closely following; love wine, though don’t know as much about it as one might hope; and are hoping to keep most dinners under €150, though we’ll want to splurge on a couple of nights.

So, here’s our current resto itinerary. I’ve also included a list of other places I’ve heard about via the boards (esp from mbfant – grazie mille!) and Time Out (which has always served me well when traveling). Any recommended revisions or other feedback would be much appreciated.

Oh, and if it’s any incentive to share your views, I plan to blog about the trip, which’ll undoubtedly include many food-centric posts. I’m happy to share my site with any who are interested.

Thu, 10-09 - Il Sanpietrino

Fri, 10-10 - Antico Arco

Sat, 10-11 - Paris (followed by late night clubbing)

Sun, 10-12 - Uno e Bino

Mon, 10-13 - Trattoria Monti

Tue, 10-14 - L’altro Mastai (is this a good romantic splurge choice?)

Wed, 10-15 - Da Felice

Thu, 10-16 - Lunch: Crudo or GiNa

Dinner: pizza (where?)

Fri, 10-17 - Agata e Romeo

Sat, 10-18 - La Piazzetta

Other places I’ve heard about:

Al Ceppo

Baby

Da Francesco – for pizza

Enoteca Ferrara

Est! Est! Est!

Fiaschetteria Beltramme

Giuda Ballerino

Il Fico

L’Osteria

Osteria del Rione – Inexpensive prix-fixe; any good?

Osteria dell’Angelo

Palatium

Piperno

Ristorante da Ottavio

Sora Margherita

Vladimiro Ristorante

Eric in SF

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My partner and I are spending ten days in Rome (Oct 9-19) – first time there for the both of us.  Needless to say I can’t wait to arrive.  Yet I am on the verge of nervous breakdown trying to pick restaurants.  Right now, I’m focusing only on dinner – I figure once I know where we’re having dinner, it’ll be a lot easier to pick out lunch.

If it helps, here’s some background: we’re staying in an apartment, just north of il Colosseo, but we’re happy to walk/bus/cab anywhere; we’re not big fans of offal (sorry if that impugns our foodie cred) but are pretty flexible otherwise – pasta and risotto are highest on our list, with salumi, pizza and fish closely following; love wine, though don’t know as much about it as one might hope; and are hoping to keep most dinners under €150, though we’ll want to splurge on a couple of nights.

...

Thu, 10-09 - Il Sanpietrino

Fri, 10-10 - Antico Arco

Sat, 10-11 - Paris (followed by late night clubbing)

Sun, 10-12 - Uno e Bino

Mon, 10-13 - Trattoria Monti

Tue, 10-14 - L’altro Mastai (is this a good romantic splurge choice?)

Wed, 10-15 - Da Felice

Thu, 10-16  - Lunch: Crudo or GiNa

    Dinner: pizza (where?)

Fri, 10-17 - Agata e Romeo

Sat, 10-18 - La Piazzetta

Other places I’ve heard about:

Al Ceppo 

Baby

Da Francesco – for pizza

Enoteca Ferrara 

Est! Est! Est!

Fiaschetteria Beltramme

Giuda Ballerino

Il Fico

L’Osteria

Osteria del Rione – Inexpensive prix-fixe; any good?

Osteria dell’Angelo

Palatium

Piperno

Ristorante da Ottavio

Sora Margherita

Vladimiro Ristorante

I have heard rumors of a change of mgt at Sanpietrino and must check it out. Offal, as with all this research you should have figured out, is not a major item on Roman menus. Some traditional places serve tripe, oxtail, and rigatoni alla paiata. More than that is hard to find and even that much is not ubiquitous. If fear of offal is why Checchino isn't on your list, think again.

You’re A-list is fine. There are only so many meals you can eat and obsessing will not make them more enjoyable. Of your B-list I like Ceppo, Baby, Giuda, Palatium, and Piperno. haven't been to Est in years so don't know. I had really awful food at Fiaschetteria Beltramme last time, a few years ago, and am equally unimpressed by Sora Margherita. They are the sort of places tourists think are cute and typical and regulars eat well at. That is the nature of the Roman trattoria. Regulars eat better than other people. Osteria dell'Angelo is OK but not worth the schlepp. Il Fico is mid-level casual, mainly seafood, and both good and friendly and also open on Sunday evening and deserves a medal. It is not, however, gastronomic A-list material, but really is pretty good.

Edited by Maureen B. Fant (log)

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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Ciao Maureen - Thanks so much for the tips... Sounds like I ought to replace Il Sanpietrino with Checchino...

And, as for the obsessing, I try to do all of that during the trip planning so I won't have to when I arrive... :rolleyes:

Grazie bene... --Eric

Eric in SF

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Ciao... Eric, like Maureen said....leave a little room in that itinerary for flexibility and serendipity. You are going to have a fantastic time no matter what!

Maureen, I have a question, if you don't mind. Recently we had dinner at a restaurant on the via Veneto, very chic, all white, a bank of clear eyed fresh fish in the window. I think it was called Tuna or Tonno, I can't remember. (Long day of emergency dental work, so I wasn't exactly on top of my game.) Anyway, it was beautiful inside, white walls, white floors, white ceramic pots, white uplighting, white chandeliers, waiters all dressed in black. Most of the clientele (local Roman) knew about the dress code, and they wore either white or black. It is probably the only time I wasn't wearing black, my closet looks like I've been a widow for the past 40 years, I felt so....un-chic in my summer floral.

So, my question, do you know anything about the place? Someone sunk a ton of euros into it, that's for sure!

Fish was beautiful, fresh, simply prepared and mighty expensive.

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Ciao... Eric, like Maureen said....leave a little room in that itinerary for flexibility and serendipity. You are going to have a fantastic time no matter what!

Maureen, I have a question, if you don't mind. Recently we had dinner at a restaurant on the via Veneto, very chic, all white, a bank of clear eyed fresh fish in the window. I think it was called Tuna or Tonno, I can't remember. (Long day of emergency dental work, so I wasn't exactly on top of my game.)  Anyway, it was beautiful inside, white walls, white floors, white ceramic pots, white uplighting,  white chandeliers, waiters all dressed in black. Most of the clientele (local Roman) knew about the dress code, and they wore either white or black. It is probably the only time I wasn't wearing black, my closet looks like I've been a widow for the past 40 years, I felt so....un-chic in my summer floral.

So, my question, do you know anything about the place? Someone sunk a ton of euros into it, that's for sure!

Fish was beautiful, fresh, simply prepared and mighty expensive.

It's called Tuna and is only a few months old and exactly as you describe. A friend and I went for lunch earlier this summer to check it out and thought it was great, not that expensive given menu and location. Chi-chi décor but classic, unfussy cooking with a southern accent. It's open Sundays, evenings too.

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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