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Ready-to-Eat Hummus & Other Salads


Pam R
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I wonder -- why bother to make it yourself?

There was a time when I would. Then I tried Sabra hummus (at first my favourite was Marakesh, then I moved onto Classic and now I'm into Zaatar). I haven't made it myself since.

I'm not a fan of babganoush in general, but the sauteed eggplant is fantastic, and I'll dip into Turkish Salad or Matbucha on occasion. Good pickles too.

I know I'm not the only one that feels this way, because I sell cases of the stuff every week. (Shamir is a good too, if you can get it.)

Who else is with me? Forget the chickpeas, and go to the refrigerated section!

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Agree, Sabra is great (just returned from supermarket with big tub of hoummous-chunky style and sauteed eggplant). Guess the only thing (for me) is the economics...it's $3.99 for a tub that would probably cost me $2.00 to make. Actually sometimes I make a batch and blend it with the pre-made stuff, since I like less tehina in mine than hubby.

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Sabra is indeed really excellent. I especially like the roasted red pepper flavor...I ate it for lunch with cheese and crackers almost every day this winter.

Still, nothing can quite come up to the pure smooth fattiness of a real fresh made hummus. Malouuf's Taste of Lebanon here in Sacramento does a version I occasionally dream about. They even have a dish there that consists of Lebanese sausage fried with onions and pine nuts served over a bed of that yummy hummus....fantastic.

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  • 8 months later...

I just tried some samples of Sabra's new flavours. They include caramelized onion (didn't try this one), sun-dried tomato, peppadew (a sweet and spicy pepper mix), chipotle (really smoky first bite turned into a spicy second bite), and . . wait for it . . . fig & cranberry.

Though classic is still my first choice, I really liked all of these -- even the fig and cranberry, which I didn't think I'd like at all.

They've also come out with 'sauteed Mediterranean vegetables' and a mild and hot salsa (refrigerated) that I haven't tried yet.

Anybody try them yet?

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I just tried some samples of Sabra's new flavours.  They include caramelized onion (didn't try this one), sun-dried tomato, peppadew (a sweet and spicy pepper mix), chipotle (really smoky first bite turned into a spicy second bite), and . . wait for it . . .  fig & cranberry.

Fig and Cranberry? Hummus? For real? Somehow this makes me think of blueberry bagels. :blink::laugh:

But if you say it's good, I'll give it a go. I have guests coming in tomorrow -- and this is what they're getting!

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Oh, I liked the tomato and chipotle more, but it wasn't bad. I even wrote an email to my supplier saying 'is it as terrible as it sounds?'. I thought it might be sweet, but it only added a hint of sweetness -- I bet the caramelized onion was sweeter.

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I'm a fan of the Tribe brand, but also like Sabra. And I agree with cakewalk that some of the flavors sure seem to delve into blueberry bagel territory.

Our local market also carries the Sabra Israeli pickles, spicy and not so spicy,

which are quite good.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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I had mixed results and very mixed enthusiasm for making my own hummus until I found three things: a good brand of garbanzos, a good brand of tahini and a good recipe.

Chickpeas in a can always taste tinny to me. There is an Italian brand called Annalisa that's not expensive and comes in a jar. The chickpeas taste clean and not stale. As for tahini, I never could deal with that stuff in the can; it's always separated and the solids are like cement. Now I buy a bottled brand made by Sadaf, which I can find in a large Arab or middle eastern deli. It's smooth and needs little mixing so it's very easy to use, and it's 100% sesame w/no preservatives. It's a mystery to me why it doesn't separate, but it doesn't. Tastes really pure and nice. Finally I found a Mark Bittman recipe that makes a balanced and flavorful hummus, and it's easy to adjust the proportions to your taste.

I don't think I've had Sabra products; sounds like a good bet in a pinch. I'm pretty much used to making my own hummus and babaganoush; it's fast and simple in the processor and the cost savings are far greater than half, as suggested above. I've seen plenty of flavored spreads that are called "hummus" as if the word means "dip." Seems like a stretch, to me--they might be very good, but in my book hummus means chickpeas, tahini, garlic, lemon, oil and spices.

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An Israeli was in my store this afternoon. He was surprised at how much he liked the cranberry/fig one. But his least favourite was the chipotle, which I really liked. He says it 'was like hummus mixed with something, not just hummus'. Hrm.

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Tried the caramelized onion flavor over the weekend, it wasn't overly sweet. Would be nice as a sandwich ingredient/spread.

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Very basic question ... would I find Sabra in a deli section in little tubs or is it something you get in bulk for resale? I'm in Courtenay on Vancouver Island where our deli mainly comes from the supermarkets ... Quality Foods and Thrifty's try, but it's not Vancouver. Susan

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It's mostly little tubs, but it is available in bulk, so some places may be re-packaging/selling out of a deli.

Do you have Costco nearby? (The local Costcos sell the roasted red pepper hummus.) Otherwise, I'd check with local grocery stores.

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I used to make my own from scratch (using dry chickpeas, never canned) but since Trader Joe's brought out their newer varieties (prior to 2006 it was not so good), I buy their various flavors. My favorite is the tomato/basil.

I have tried other packaged brands and have not been satisfied with them. I did buy the bulk stuff at the middle eastern market that has since closed (sob!) here in my town and since there is no other source I trust, I stick to TJs.

I also like TJs tahini.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I enjoy Sabra and used to eat it all the time in college--the store near campus sold it. But I find it a little too creamy and smooth, if there is such a thing. I like some texture in my hummus. Anyone with me?

My solution is usually to make hummus at home. Cheap, and with a food processor almost instantaneous.

Edited by Lochina (log)
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The only purchased hummus I like is from Flying Frog Cafe in Asheville NC, which they also sell in area markets. It's a very dense hummus. I can't stand a fluffy or soft hummus. I make mine from scratch most of the time, starting with dried not canned. I'm glad to see I'm not alone in hummus preferences :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
I enjoy Sabra and used to eat it all the time in college--the store near campus sold it. But I find it a little too creamy and smooth, if there is such a thing. I like some texture in my hummus. Anyone with me?

I'm totally with you -- just tried Sabra for the first time today (based on this thread) and while the flavor is delicious, it is too smooth and whipped for me, and actually a little too rich as well -- feels like it has more oil / tahini incorporated than I like. (Note that I couldn't find the Sabra "chunky" at Wegmans...) I think I prefer the Tribe consistency better... But I also often just make my own, as I do like just a straight chickpea dip too, with no tahini at all...

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Ok, now I may eat my words (and some more Sabra hummus)... While at first I was convinced the Sabra was too smooth and rich and whipped... Well... After polishing off the rest of the container as a dip with whole grain tortilla chips.... I've changed my tune. Very tasty stuff, I think particularly well suited for dipping, as opposed to something like sandwiches...

Emily

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I used to make my own from scratch (using dry chickpeas, never canned)

Do you mean you ground them up dry/raw? Seems like I read about that somewhere. But maybe that was falafel (?) patties. Or did you just start with dry ones....soak and boil?

I usually make my own, since I don't plan ahead on the soaking. I always have canned on hand. This week Goya garbanzos are 2 cans /$1. at Wegmans. Wegmans own brand is good too. Tahina is sometimes a problem, it does go rancid.

I had the best ever hummus in Turkey, don't know the secret, but they did top it with shreds of crispy dried beef. I flavor mine with "6 pepper" mix.

J

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  • 1 month later...
I wonder -- why bother to make it yourself?

There was a time when I would.  Then I tried Sabra hummus

Reading all the praise heaped upon Sabra, and never having heard of them, I visited their web site. Hummus made with Canola or Soybean oil doesn't interest me, nor does the other junk found in the ingredient list. I'll continue making my own or buy the hummus made at the local middle eastern deli, where the ingredients are fresh and high quality. Sabra, it seems, is made in NYC - that's a long way from the San Francisco area.

scb

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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My grocery store usually only carries Athenos hummus, which is ok, but today when I went in, they had Sabra's Seriously spicy. The girls in the deli had a container open to try and it was quite good. I'm not even a spicy fan myself, but it wasn't bad. I'll look for Sabra at other stores in the future.

"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

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I wonder -- why bother to make it yourself?

There was a time when I would.  Then I tried Sabra hummus

Reading all the praise heaped upon Sabra, and never having heard of them, I visited their web site. Hummus made with Canola or Soybean oil doesn't interest me, nor does the other junk found in the ingredient list. I'll continue making my own or buy the hummus made at the local middle eastern deli, where the ingredients are fresh and high quality. Sabra, it seems, is made in NYC - that's a long way from the San Francisco area.

scb

Try it, then decide. I used to make my own hummus, but Sabra is better than mine, I admit it. A heck of a lot easier too. :)

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