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Domestic Rotisserie


maxmillan
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It was 3am and through bleary eyes I watched in fascination at this infomercial advertising a large toaster size electric rotisserie.

http://www.myrotisserie.com/

After a few more viewings and browsing through the internet I thought this could offer me roasted meals without using my oven. My place is tiny and I don't like oven food smell permeating my furniture and clothing. I cook on a portable gas range outside (bacon, stir fry, etc.) This rotisserie can make chicken, roast, french fries and so on.

Does anyone have any comments before I buy this?

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My brother and mother love his rotisseries. I've never seen it in action or tasted any food from it - I live too far away. His FIL gave it to my SIL and they usually stuff his gifts away in a closet but they actually use this one.

It's one of these Showtime Rotisseries from Ron Popiel

www.ronco.com

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  • 2 months later...

Hi there

Mr O is a diehard rotisserie fanatic and we have a really amazing place near us that does great chickens and these delicious little sausages. thing is I know it would be the ultimate christmas present to get him one so he can do his own at home. I have seen some reviews on various sites for the Ronco rotisseries with both positive and negative comments. So I thought to myself 'why am I roaming these silly sites when I have my very own experts?'

so my question is:

- are these things any good?

- if there are good domestic brands what are they?

- is it worth my kitchen space or will this soon join the pasta machine in the back of my cupboard?

I'd appreciate your input

Budget can stretch for a good one if it exists

Thanks guys :smile:

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I'd appreciate your input

Budget can stretch for a good one if it exists

Check out the "dinner thread" and you will see that David Ross has recently posted photos of the most gorgeous rotisserie chicken that he makes with his "Showtime" rotisserie (by Ronco). There are more relevant photos in his blog, as well.

I think that it is a very good product and the price is fairly reasonable.

FWIW, I've seen "practically new" models selling on ebay for $25!

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My Mom had the Ronco rot. It got used a handful of times but eventually went to a garage sale. Too many parts to wash and a little too large to be stored in a cabinet less than utility size. If you have a grill (charcoal or gas) I'd look into a rotisserie for the grill. Then all you have to clean is the bar and locking forks, which if you spray with PAM come clean pretty easily.

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  • 1 month later...

Does anyone have one of those counter rotisseries? I found a copy of Steven Raichlen"s Indoor Grilling cookbook at a used book store for a ridiculously low price so of course it came home with me. MANY of the recipes call for rotisserie cooking. The recipes sound great. I have never even thought of buying a rotisserie, but after reading the recipes and then reading some articles about using a rotisserie I am tempted to buy one. It sounds like a great holiday gift for us. Some women like jewelry, perfume, and flowers. I go for things I want to use in the kitchen. My favorite holiday and birthday presents have been a pasta maker (the hand-crank Italian model), the sausagemaker and meat grinder attachments for our KitchenAid, and a Wolf Range. Is a rotisserie in my future?

Does anyone have one? Does the food really come out juicy and with a nice crust. Do you use it for all kinds of meats, fish, and vegetables?

Please let me know how you use it / if you like it.

Thanks!

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Does anyone have one of those counter rotisseries? I found a copy of Steven Raichlen"s Indoor Grilling cookbook at a used book store for a ridiculously low price so of course it came home with me. MANY of the recipes call for rotisserie cooking. The recipes sound great. I have never even thought of buying a rotisserie, but after reading the recipes and then reading some articles about using a rotisserie I am tempted to buy one. It sounds like a great holiday gift for us. Some women like jewelry, perfume, and flowers. I go for things I want to use in the kitchen.  My favorite holiday and birthday presents have been a pasta maker (the hand-crank Italian model), the sausagemaker and meat grinder attachments for our KitchenAid, and a Wolf Range. Is a rotisserie in my future?

  Does anyone have one? Does the food really come out juicy and with a nice crust. Do you use it for all kinds of meats, fish, and vegetables?

  Please let me know how you use it / if you like it.

  Thanks!

Hopefully these photos will convince you to buy the Ron Popeil 'Set it and Forget it' Rotisserie. It is quite simply a fantastic contraption. It will give you incredibly juicy, tender chicken. I also use it for game hens, pork ribs and prime rib. It is well worth the price. It's a bit odd to think that the man who sold spray-on hair in a can could also invent such a wonderful piece of cookery equipment-but it works great.

The second photo is the chicken plated with swiss chard with bacon, mashed potatoes and chicken jus.

gallery_41580_4407_108997.jpg

gallery_41580_4407_114250.jpg

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I bought a factory-reconditioned Showtime from Amazon.com several years ago, having never seen the infomercials. My UPS guy was all excited when he delivered the box, as his brother owned one--think he hoped I'd invite him back for dinner!

In any case, it does a great job on whole poultry, chicken cutlets, fish, vegetables...can't comment on red meat as I don't do it. Not as bad to clean up as one might think if you have a sink full of hot, soapy water ready to soak the parts. I would suggest buying a set of heavy silicon oven mitts to wear while unloading the food.

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I have the Franklin vertical rotisserie and it does a fabulous job on a chicken but that's about it. I grudgingly allow it some real estate because it really is a no-watch cooking appliance that comes in handy a few times a year.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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David,

I want to buy the rotisserie based on the look of your chicken alone. How did you get such beautiful looking chicken jus using the rotisserie? I read that they have a drip pan, but thought that it was not terribly big. Were you able to make that beautiful jus with just those juices alone? One downside I thought was that you don't get the carmelized bits to make a good gravy. What have you found?

Thanks!

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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I'm not David, but I can tell you that the drip pan on Showtimes (Popeil) cover the entire floor of the unit. It looks like a broiler pan. David's pictures of the browning are accurate....I think it's time to buy another chicken!

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Another vote for the "set it and forget it" rotisserie. I had one for years, and it's one of the reasons that I bought my current oven (which has a built-in rotisserie).

Yes, the food does come out just like it looks in David Ross' pictures.

I've seen great deals on Ebay . . . nearly new ones going for around $25.

Coincidentally, I bought two chickens yesterday afternoon and tonight they are going to look like this:

gallery_51874_5165_443995.jpg

I don't bother brining or anything . . . just apply whatever spices seem to fit the mood of the moment and then into the oven.

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I am just about sold on the Ronco model. There does not seem to be a "Fix It and Forget It" model. I have found models called "Showtime". Could the "Fix It" version just be an older model? Does anyone know if any of the newer models compare well to the one that you have?

Has anyone done a roast, pork sounds like it would wonderful, with their rotisserie? I am hoping that spearing the meat would not make it lose its juices. I know not to turn things by stabbing them because I don't want the juices to run out. Is this the same idea?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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I am just about sold on the Ronco model. There does not seem to be a "Fix It and Forget It" model. I have found models called "Showtime". Could the "Fix It" version just be an older model? Does anyone know if any of the newer models compare well to the one that you have?

  Has anyone done a roast, pork sounds like it would wonderful, with their rotisserie? I am hoping that spearing the meat would not make it lose its juices. I know not to turn things by stabbing them because I don't want the juices to run out. Is this the same idea?

Does beef roast very well. Fix it and forget it is basically just the timer. I usually follow the time tables that came with the instructions.

Most juices that result from piercing the roast tend to baste the the roast as it turns resulting in an excellent crust. I can't remember ever ending up with a dry roast.

"And in the meantime, listen to your appetite and play with your food."

Alton Brown, Good Eats

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I am just about sold on the Ronco model. There does not seem to be a "Fix It and Forget It" model. I have found models called "Showtime". Could the "Fix It" version just be an older model? Does anyone know if any of the newer models compare well to the one that you have?

"Fix It and Forget It" is/was a slogan that appears in the instructional video, and, I suppose, the commercials. As far as different models of the Showtime go, there are several different size capacities. Mine has a dial timer; some have digital timers...I'm not aware of any other changes. BTW, if you want the extra accessories (kebab rods, rib baskets, etc.), they can often be picked up through eBay at great prices.

As for clean up, HOT water + Dawn Direct Foam + a brief soak.

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I've always enjoyed the food that comes out of it -- but it is the cleanup that I hate.  I can never get the parts clean, so it is sitting in my cabinet, as I have been thinking about getting rid of it.

I ask this because I am not familiar with the product, but are the parts that are difficult to clean made of metal? I'm curious if they could be put into a self-cleaning oven and run through the self-cleaning cycle without harming the parts. Otherwise, the Dawn Power Dissolver sounds like it may work (my mom swears by the product for cleaning her stove grates).

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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David,

  I want to buy the rotisserie based on the look of your chicken alone. How did you get such beautiful looking chicken jus using the rotisserie? I read that they have a drip pan, but thought that it was not terribly big. Were you able to make that beautiful jus with just those juices alone? One downside I thought was that you don't get the carmelized bits to make a good gravy. What have you found?

  Thanks!

The drip pan is just like a small broiler pan. I rub the chicken with olive oil and then season it. As the chicken rotates, the olive oil, rub seasonings and natural chicken juice and fat, continually baste the bird. I find the trick to getting a deep-golden bird is to roast it for about 1 1/2 hours. The instructions on the unit will tell you to roast a chicken for about an hour. Unfortunately, I find that will result in a chicken with pale skin. So going a bit longer gives a golden, crisp skin and yet the meat is still moist. It's that self-basting that makes the meat so moist.

I get plenty of juice, and browned bits, dripping into the drip pan. But to make the chicken jus, or gravy, I'll add a bit of additional chicken stock to the pan drippings, maybe boil that down to concentrate the flavor, then strain it. That's the sauce you see in the photo. Thanks.

gallery_41580_4407_114250.jpg

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I find the trick to getting a deep-golden bird is to roast it for about 1 1/2 hours.  The instructions on the unit will tell you to roast a chicken for about an hour.  Unfortunately, I find that will result in a chicken with pale skin.  So going a bit longer gives a golden, crisp skin and yet the meat is still moist.  It's that self-basting that makes the meat so moist.

David, I'm curious if you check the temperature when you take it out after 1.5 hours? Also, what size bird are you using? I did two 4.75 lb. chickens last night, and after 60 minutes, the meat was 160 F in the breast (and higher in the legs/thighs). I wanted to let it go a little longer because the skin was not as dark as I had hoped, but I was afraid that the meat would be overdone. (I did remove, tent and let rest for 20 minutes, at which time the breast meat was nearly 170 F -- I didn't bother re-checking the temp of the legs/thighs).

Also, I made a quick stock with the giblets and necks using a pressure cooker, and used that as the base for gravy. Perhaps I am overseasoning the birds, but I find that the stuff in the drip tray sometimes is too salty to use for gravy. I suppose that I could use less seasoning if I brined ahead of time, but that would require forethought! :wink:

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