Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The NYC ramen topic 2007-


Fat Guy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Soup curry originated in Sapporo, Hokkaido. It seems to have gained popularity in Tokyo now. I haven't tried it yet, but it seems more of "ethnic" (India- or Southeast Asia-influenced) curry than regular Japanese curry.

I haven't had curry ramen, either. I don't think it can be tasty (based on my imagination). But I can assure you that curry udon and curry nanban (soba) are totally different things, and are worth trying. I actually like both of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For some reason I can eat curry and rice all day long but never once will I combine curry and noodles. I think that's some Indian culinary reclamation project going on inside me. However, curry pan rocks my world. They have them at Cafe Zaiya and most any Japanese bakery. $1.50, you really can't beat it. This is also a top-seller at Japanese convenience store. I bet more Japanese people have a curry pan for breakfast than an egg....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last night I picked up some shio ramen from Rai Rai Ken. I forgot how good they are. I was trying to go to Minca but I was too late. I had stopped going to Rai Rai Ken for awhile because, at one point, their soup was just too salty. Last night's soup totally wasn't too salty. Oh, and I agree, I don't like curry ramen at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you tried Setagaya yet? If shioramen is your thing, go there. I don't think it's any coincidence that Setagaya opened for the summer, when you would be craving a lighter broth like their shioramen, rather than fall or winter, where your tastes would definitely skew towards a richer and more hearty broth.

But for a shoyu or misoramen, you could do a lot worse than rai rai ken or minca. Minca's broth is unspectacular but they probably have the best assortment of toppings of any ramenya. Minca offers tons of toppings like toroniku.

I biked by Ippudo's address and the front of the building, both sides, is completely boarded up for construction - I have no idea when they're opening at this point....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Sietsema reviewed RockMeisha ロクメイシャ(if you want to google some pics from Japanese-in-NY blogs) , it's been there for several years. I've put them in my NY ramen top 5 for some time but haven't been back recently, honestly if I have $14 to drop on a ramen I'll walk over and get an akamaru modern at Ippudo, if I want the accompanying izakaya experience without the bastardization of "Japanaese tapas" that others have done with it, then I'll go to rockmeisha, I don't know why I haven't gotten there recently, it's seemingly always closed when I go, or if I am looking at izakaya fun I've already somehow migrated towards the east side by then...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to Rockmeisha last night after the Siestema review. The ramen wasn't as good as Ippudo, but we still really enjoyed it. Agree w/Siestema's description of the broth's porky flavor. I also loved how calm and quiet the restaurant was on a Saturday night at prime time--a nice break from the crowds and waits at Ippudo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Just a note that I tried Rai Rai Ken a few months ago, and got their curry ramen. While I found the curry flavor to be delicious -- rich and complex -- it was VERY salty... So salty that I couldn't actually finish it for that reason. But as mentioned, that was a few months ago -- don't know if its different now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Next time if it's too salty, send it back

Unless they ruined the house tare, they probably had a heavy hand with the soy sauce

Thanks raji -- that is good to know. I figured it was something related to the broth itself, and thus couldn't be fixed. I didn't realize that soy is commonly added to the broth when putting a bowl of ramen together.

Emily

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Next time if it's too salty, send it back

Unless they ruined the house tare, they probably had a heavy hand with the soy sauce

Thanks raji -- that is good to know. I figured it was something related to the broth itself, and thus couldn't be fixed. I didn't realize that soy is commonly added to the broth when putting a bowl of ramen together.

Emily

If it's a shoyuramen, definitely

Not so much curryramen, so maybe they screwed up

would not be the first time at RaiRaiKen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 months later...

My "Holy Grail" in NYC for the past couple of years is discovering the best joints for that venerable Japanese

staple, ramen noodles.

I've found three that top my current list, Ippudo in the East Village and Menchenko-Tai and Saburi in Midtown, in that order.

Ippudo is rather pricey, but worth it. The place is always packed, there's an hour wait at dinnertime. I found the broth to be spectacular, and the side dishes equally so, some of them unavailable anywhere else in town.

Three "must haves" on their menu would be the mild Japanese peppers, simply sauteed in olive oil and sea salt, their super-fresh, whole Japanese pickles lightly seasoned with sesame oil and spices, and a pork bun that totally blows away any sort of "chashu" type bun in Chinatown... it is makes my "Orgasmic Moments" list with flying colors. I found Menchenko-Tai's "Assari" ramen a solid contender for second, with a unique selection of "Japanese comfort foods" offered, as well. I also found a quite respectable bowl at Saburi, along with other dishes that were both delicious and "different." They describe their food as "Chinese-style Japanese," which has a special designation in Japanese that I can never quite remember.

I recommend these places wholeheartedly, and would enjoy hearing your comments on each. But I'm always on the hunt for the "ultimate." Any other recommendations that you'd care to share?

"If love be the food of life, eat on."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...
I also found a quite respectable bowl at Saburi, along with other dishes that were both delicious and "different." They describe their food as "Chinese-style Japanese," which has a special designation in Japanese that I can never quite remember

Wafuu-chuuka

Also as known as - not Wakiya :-(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...