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Draft vermouth


TAPrice
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The last time I spent a lot of time in Spain (which was, sadly, about 7 years ago), vermouth on tap was all the rage. Everywhere I went, there where signs that said, "Hay vermouth de grifo." Even the national library had it. I could order my 300 year-old book of baroque sermons, slip down to the cafeteria for a few vermouths, and by the time I finished them my book would be waiting at my desk. Such a civilized way to research! The Library of Congress may be better organized, but it has no bar.

The vermouth was sweet vermouth, but far superior to anything out of the bottle. Just like most bottled beers can't match the version on tap.

What I'm wondering is what a cocktail with draft vermouth would taste like? Unfortunately, I don't know that it can be found outside Spain and I'm not sure many people in Spain would know how to mix a drink.

Edited by TAPrice (log)

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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Okay, that's it; I'm taking some growlers and going to Spain! I take it they have Spanish brands like Miro as well as the standard Italian and French varieties?

I'm surprised to hear about this, because the reason for draft beer is the storing and shipping of beer in pressurized kegs. As aromatized wine, vermouth has no reason to be hooked to a draft tap; at best, I could imagine it doled out like cask ales or cellared wine into jugs, carafes, or drinking vessels. In any case, I don't see how it would be different from bottled vermouth except that a keg may be sealed against oxidation, whereas an (open) bottle isn't. But presumably most bars worth their salt go through enough vermouth, and store it well enough, that oxidation isn't a factor.

Mayur Subbarao, aka "Mayur"
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Honestly, it's been so long since I've been there (and that kills me) and at the time I knew nothing about drinks, so I really don't know what was on tap.

Now that I've recently purchased some bianco vermouth, I'm surprised how much it tastes like the sweet vermouth on tap in Spain. In Spain, though, it was dark red.

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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Honestly, it's been so long since I've been there (and that kills me) and at the time I knew nothing about drinks, so I really don't know what was on tap.

Now that I've recently purchased some bianco vermouth, I'm surprised how much it tastes like the sweet vermouth on tap in Spain. In Spain, though, it was dark red.

vermouth is just good to drink on the rocks... i drank two glasses of rosso antico on the rocks today while i worked lunch... i used to think it was pretty good stuff but now that i started making my own fresh its kinda boring... i make mine more bitter than average so i don't need to add additional bitters if i make a manhattan or a marconi... though for some batches reagan's added beautiful complexity.

i have a couple recipes related to wines i really like and their inner mechanics. i really want to try some other artisinal kinds to see whats possible. i've still yet to have carpano antica or barolo chinatto...

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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