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Lebanese Pickled Eggplant.


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Stuffed with Walnuts, garlic and Pomegranates.

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18 small 2"-3" Eggplants

1 1/2 C diced Walnuts

1 C tart Pomegranates

1 small Jalapeño finely diced

2 clove Garlic finely diced

salt*

olive oil

After peeling the green tops off the Eggplants, they were blanched in simmering water for 10 minutes until tender, and placed in an ice bath to cool.

Slits were made and salt was applied to the inside of all eggplant.

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The eggplants were placed in a strainer and pressed with a heavy weight for a few hours to dry them.

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Mixed the nuts, garlic, Jalapenos, pomegranates and 1 tsp* salt. Placed about 1 T of the mixture in each eggplant.

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Placed the eggplants in jars cut side up, and filled with olive oil to cover.

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* We could not get a definitive answer on the amount of salt to use in the filling and did it to taste. We'll find out in 2 weeks and report back.

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Those look fantastic! I regard eggplant as an ideal pickling food.

I've had long strips of spicy pickled eggplant, feels like pasta in the mouth. I'll look forward to your taste test.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Oh my goodness, those look gorgeous. I love eggplant in all forms. Do you eat those as an accompaniment to something, or as a plates with olives, dips, etc.?

Lebanese food was quite popular where I grew up (in Nova Scotia - would you agree, Peter?), but I mostly just remember shwarma gulped down after a night of drinking. I'd love to see what dishes are served at home.

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ChefCrash This looks great!

I have still some Pomegranates on my mother's tree, and I saw lovely looking small eggplants in the market… so I'm almost on my way.

Just to be sure:

The Walnuts are cooked or uncooked?

Do you keep it in a special place for the 2 weeks, and after opening in the fridge?

Thanks,

Boaziko

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Well, I'll be waiting with bated breath for your report! I could easily make this preserve here in Japan.

By the way, do you add vinegar before covering with oil to prevent botulism, or do you keep the preserves in the fridge?

The only acidity is from the tart Pomegranates, no vinegar or brine. In the old days the jars would have been kept in the coldest room of the house.:)

Those look fantastic! I regard eggplant as an ideal pickling food.

I've had long strips of spicy pickled eggplant, feels like pasta in the mouth. I'll look forward to your taste test.

I think it might have been a very young Emeril 15 years ago demonstrated one way to pickle Eggplants. In a terrine he layered long blanched slices of eggplant, between the slices he drizzled: Balsamic vinegar, salt, finely diced garlic and then topped the whole thing off with olive oil.

Oh my goodness, those look gorgeous. I love eggplant in all forms. Do you eat those as an accompaniment to something, or as a plates with olives, dips, etc.?...

Exactly.:)

ChefCrash This looks great!

I have still some Pomegranates on my mother's tree, and I saw lovely looking small  eggplants in the market… so I'm almost on my way.

Just to be sure:

The Walnuts are cooked or uncooked?

Do you keep it in a special place for the 2 weeks, and after opening in the fridge?

Thanks,

Boaziko

The walnuts are not cooked. Be sure to use sour Pomegranates.

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Great looking eggplant. Another favorite snack of mine and the brother of the Stuffed Chilies in Oil

I do love to use peanuts instead of walnuts though. I just love the assertive peanut flavor more in these preparations. I do like the addition of the pomagranate seeds.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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You mention sour pomegranates - do you mean under-ripe ones, or is there a particular variety that is best for this purpose?

Pomegranates have been grown in Japan for a long time, but they are mostly ornamental - they have quite small fruit compared to the type sold for eating. I haven't ever compared the taste.

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You mention sour pomegranates - do you mean under-ripe ones, or is there a particular variety that is best for this purpose?

Pomegranates have been grown in Japan for a long time, but they are mostly ornamental - they have quite small fruit compared to the type sold for eating. I haven't ever compared the taste.

Sour Pomegranates are a variety that remains sour when ripe. The cones are generally small and the kernels are dark red in color. They are used in cooking such as in the filling for baked Kibbeh, and in Babaganooj in place of lemon juice.

Sour pomegranates are used to make Pomegranate syrup.

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  • 2 months later...

A nice way to have eggplants is grilling them over coals in slices then putting them in olive oil and garlic overnight.

The next day you have a delicious meal to eat with freshly made Pitas.

You can also do this with zucchini and many other vegetables. :raz:

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