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Jerky: The Topic


bunny
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Something else worth trying that's great is to take a tenderloin and tease it apart into long strands. Marinated and smoked, it makes amazingly succulent (if a bit extravagant) jerky.

I do this with venison from deer I kill each year, and it's spectacular. Starts off chewy and firm, then just melts in your mouth. Very, very tough not to eat the whole bag the day you make it.

Any dish you make will only taste as good as the ingredients you put into it. If you use poor quality meats, old herbs and tasteless winter tomatoes I don’t even want to hear that the lasagna recipe I gave you turned out poorly. You're a cook, not a magician.

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I encountered the same thing the first time I decided to make jerky, so I did an experiment. I used two pieces and cut one with the grain and one against the grain (at about 1/4"). I far preferred the against the grain version (the with the grain was just too chewy and hard to tear a chunk off of with your teeth). But you might prefer the more chewy. I would try both (or all three, including on the bias) and see which you like better.

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  • 1 year later...

Soup, here is a post of my first jerky attempt over at the smoking meats forum.

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forums/sh...219&postcount=1

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forums/sh...550&postcount=8

The uses of a cure like sodium nitrite is good if you plan on not refridgerating your jerky or plan to keep it for longer than a week or two. Most recipes I found on the web didn't use sodium nitrite. I didn't use it because I couldn't find it. The jerky was cooked at temperatures of 170 to start and get the meat out of the danger zone then the temp was dropped to further dry the meat.

Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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  • 4 years later...

Working on a recipe----> that in the first test batch wasnt to bad!!

75g Fresh Pineapple

75g Korean Drk Soy

25g Water

1 Clove sliced garlic

1 scallion diced

dash of molassas

1/2 dried scorpian pepper

Now again this is a test batch

1/2-3/4 # of sliced wet age 2 weeks and dry aged beef knuckle meat sliced 1/4 thick, i'll marinade 2-3 days and dry in my de-hydrator

Its good to have Morels

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I have a recipe for Sriracha jerky written on paper somewhere in my spice cabinet.

I do not like jerky recipes that call for soy sauce and/or worcestershire. I find their flavors too overpowering to the meat. I mix salt + water to equal the volume of soy sauce in a recipe and caculate the amount of sodium in mg. Worcestershire i will omit all together unless it is a main source of liquid in a recipe, in that case i will sub water, or other liquid used in that recipe.

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Agreed about the soy. Unless I'm making an asian flavoured jerky I leave it out. My favourite spice mix is below:

Grind in spice grinder:

5 chipotles

2 ancho chillies.

1 tsp peppercorns

1 tsp allspice berries

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 inch cinnamon stick

Add:

1tsp onion powder

1tsp garlic powder

1 tbsp smoked paprika

2 tbsp brown sugar

I coat the meat in this and then add enough salt to make up about 1% of the weight of the meat and let it cure for a couple days before dehydrating..

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  • 1 year later...

I was flipping through the pages of Modernist Cuisine at Home when I came across a recipe for Microwaved Beef Jerky. Has anyone tried making jerky using this technique?

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Elsie - I have not tried the microwave method but this guy http://jetcitygastrophysics.com/2012/07/05/modernist-cuisine-at-home-microwaved-beef-jerky/ apparently has. Has pics and comments about, I think, the very recipe you may want to try. And he also tried it in a dehydrator as well - says it was superior (and in the pic those pieces definitely looked 'drier') but I don't think he hated the microwaved version either.

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This might also be of interest.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Thank you both. I have read both articles and so I will split the batch and dry half in the microwave and the other half in the oven. It would seem that the MC method and the MC@H methods differ in several aspects according to the article Deryn linked to. MC says to cut with the grain 5 mm thick. MC@H says to cut against the grain, 12 mm thick. The MC@H also calls for the following additions to the marinade: maple syrup, Worcestershire sauce and cayenne pepper. I wonder if the difference in thickness is related to whether the meat is cut with or across the grain? I know when I was cutting it I wondered if it wasn't too thick, but then, I have never tried making jerky before, so what do I know? One comment I found interesting in the oven dried article - someone suggested pinning the strips to the oven racks with clothing pins. Might be a cleaner way to dry this stuff, especially if you line the oven floor. I am thinking of trying this although my pins are plastic so am not altogether sure that's a good idea. In any event, I will post the results here in case someone else comes along and is interested in following this particular recipe. It sure is expensive to buy the stuff already prepared.

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Not having a solar oven, I used the microwave to do the initial 4 pieces. They took forever, and was a serious hands on operation what with the turning, blotting, etc. DH said it was tasty but "very chewy". Today I did the rest in the oven at 185F with a spoon stuck in the door so moisture could escape. Picture below, missing are the microwave ones which I did not include as they look the same. DH said it was really good but "not jerky". He thinks, and I agree, that it should be thinner. So I will try this again but I will stick the meat in the freezer first to really firm it up, and then slice it thinly on the electric slicer to something shy of 1/4" unless someone tells me otherwise. I am thinking I might try eye of round. I realize it is not as "beefy" tasting but I think it would make nice thin slices. I will use the oven again (205 F with the spoon stuck in the door brought it to about 185 F) and we shall see how that goes. If it turns out really well, I may spring for a dehydrator. Hard to believe this was 1 1/2 pounds of flank steak.

image.jpg

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Id reconsider Alton Brown's box fan technique  cheap than a dehydrator and can be used 'plain' when it Hot Inside !

Thanks, but not very practical as I live in a condo. I have room to set it up but then storage becomes an issue. Course, the same could be said for a purchased dehydrator but as it happens, the oven worked well.

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Update on the jerky: I had been feeding my husband warm bits of jerky during the drying process and he said it wasn't jerky. It has since cooled down and when he tried it he said "now that's jerky"! So he says it's really good and he's happy with it. Just need to slice it thinner next time to improve the texture.

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If you can keep your oven temperature low enough, below 180F perhaps. you can try to put an electric fan inside to make dehydration much better.

 

Make sure you use an induction motor or a shaded pole AC motor driven fan. Don't use a computer "muffin" type fan. Those are "brush-less" electronic fans which are heat sensitive.

 

dcarch

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If you can keep your oven temperature low enough, below 180F perhaps. you can try to put an electric fan inside to make dehydration much better.

 

Make sure you use an induction motor or a shaded pole AC motor driven fan. Don't use a computer "muffin" type fan. Those are "brush-less" electronic fans which are heat sensitive.

 

dcarch

The main oven will go as low as 170F and the Breville 120F. Both are convection. I thought 185 was the right temperature based on what I read but are you saying I should go lower? Are you suggesting that I use a fan in lieu of or in addition to the the convection setting?

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The main oven will go as low as 170F and the Breville 120F. Both are convection. I thought 185 was the right temperature based on what I read but are you saying I should go lower? Are you suggesting that I use a fan in lieu of or in addition to the the convection setting?

 

All ovens are designed not to ventilate very well to conserve energy. Only ventilate enough to keep certain controls not to overheat. Therefore for dehydrating, it's a good idea to keep the door slightly open to vent moisture.

 

A convection fan in a convection oven does not move air as well as a regular fan.

 

dcarch

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  • 5 months later...

I bought a cheap dehydrator and decided biltong would be a good starting point. I'm making a batch each of beef and 'roo biltong. The meat was rubbed in rock salt and set aside for a couple hours, given a bath in cider vin and rubbed it with black pepper and coriander. I'll see what it's like in the morning.

image.jpg1_zps0vyzvf0h.jpg

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Chris, I am in the middle of a few batches of venison jerky at the moment and your post reminded me that I need to make some biltong too. I will see if I can find my recipe and post it up.

In my experience, by using the dehydrator you will not get real biltong if the temperature is above ambient as it needs to dry slowly and continue to cure as well. I have a box for drying biltong that has a few computer fans to move the air. When I get home I will take some photos of it.

Was the beef brined? I start mine with corned beef, coat it with the rub and let it marinate for 24 hours then rinse in diluted vinegar before drying.

Simon

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Chris, I will be interested to hear how it goes with that method.

Here is my recipe.

Recipe - Biltong

2 tsp ground cumin

2tsp ground coriander

1/2 tsp bicarbonate soda

1/2 tsp Chilli powder

1/2 tsp pepper

4 tsp coriander seeds, toasted and crushed

8 tsp soft brown sugar

2.5Kg corned beef, point cut, sliced 10mm thick

Sprinkle slices liberally with rub, lay in plastic container and sprinkle with vinegar, add rest of meat in layers. Refrigerate for 24 hrs

Rinse lightly in 25% vinegar solution and air dry (can rake up to a week).

Simon

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