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Pam R

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls--Cook-Off 36

137 posts in this topic

Made a quasi-Syrian lamb version using a Paula Wolfert recipe as a base: 1 lb minced lamb with 1 c rice, a minced sauteed onion, olive oil, some toasted pine nuts, S&P, allspice, cayenne (smidge), and cinnamon. Braised for a long time (about 90 minutes) in a tomato/pomegranate molasses bath. They were great, though I could have upped the spices in the filling and added some to the tomato sauce.

What sort of rice are people using? I used Nishiki medium grain, but wondered about using short grain sweet (sticky) rice.

ETA: I resisted the urge to truss, btw. No, uh, need, as it turns out. Right-o.


Edited by chrisamirault (log)

Chris Amirault

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when you roll your cabbage leaves, tuck the ends in w/ your fingers...

think about it like rolling up a burrito so the stuff doesn't come out the ends...

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What sort of rice are people using? I used Nishiki medium grain, but wondered about using short grain sweet (sticky) rice.

I used a short grain rice as the only long grain I had was fragrant (basmati and jasmine) and I didn't have enough medium grain for the recipe. I thought it turned out wonderfully however the recipe used called for the rice to be toasted so that may have had some impact.

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I used long-grain. I was thinking of trying something else, but, well, Baba didn't.

I want to do another batch, similar to the last one, but with ground chicken instead of meat. I may try a different rice and I think a nice napa/savoy cabbage.

I assemble the rolls by placing a line of filling along the bottom of the cabbage leaf (the part that's closest to me), then roll it up, so that the filling is covered in cabbage, then fold each end in and finish by rolling it the rest of the way up.

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Sour Cabbage is something I have never heard of before. Is it whole head cabbage processed like sauerkraut?

I think that the next time I make a batch of Kim Chi, I will roll a bunch of whole large nappa leaves to ferment for use in cabbage rolls.

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Made a quasi-Syrian lamb version using a Paula Wolfert recipe as a base: 1 lb minced lamb with 1 c rice, a minced sauteed onion, olive oil, some toasted pine nuts, S&P, allspice, cayenne (smidge), and cinnamon. Braised for a long time (about 90 minutes) in a tomato/pomegranate molasses bath. They were great, though I could have upped the spices in the filling and added some to the tomato sauce.

I realize that I forgot to tell you that these sounded really good. What happens to the texture of the pine nuts as they're cooking? Was the rice cooked or raw? Why aren't there any pictures?

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I toasted the pine nuts pretty well, so the maintained a firm toothiness. Them's oily buggers, so I don't think that the liquids soften them up too much.

Rice was uncooked -- in fact, I can't see how you'd make them with the rice cooked. Doesn't it just break down into a soggy mess?

I didn't take pictures because juggling the stuffing and the remote control left no extra hands. They're also ugly. But since you asked, I just had a bit of my dinner early:

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Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I have been watching this thread with much intrest. And it has also promped me to research EVERY book I own.. lol.. and in my poking around I found a few variations on this theme..

One is called (and please forgive, and correct my brutal spelling concerning the names).. Linyvi Holubtsi. It is basically a "lasagne" type cabbage/rice/tomato baked dish where the cabbage is layered with the rice and tomato sauce and/or steamed tomatos. And then served with a meat dish.. A meatloaf or maybe some sausages?

The other is Kilivi Haluptovin (pronounced keely haloup-ta-vein.. again forgive my butchery) or russian lazy cabbage rolls.. and JEL aluded to this prep in a previous post.. Where you would cut your cabbage into strips and saute them with onion untill semi soft and then add the wilted cabbage/onion to a dish with tomato sauce and then top with a meat/rice/seasoning mixture.. either "loaf" type single servings or pack the meat edge to edge to cover.. bake.. and then invert the dish onto a serving platter.

I guess there is more than one way to skin a cat... In the end its all tasty.

Chow down,

Kev

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Hey Kev, welcome to eG Forums! From what cuisines do these dishes hail?

Thanks for the welcome.

The first is a Ukranian dish, the other hails from Russia.

All pretty much the same stuff.. its just "semantics", if you will... And I had no intention of derailing the cabbage roll discussion.. just figured I would add a few options.

And of course fennel, garlic, onion, etc.. are always welcome additions/subtractions... heck its your soup.. make it how ya want!

Chow down,

Kev

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I assume that "sour cabbage" is sour Kraut that has not been sliced beforehand.

sauerkraut is very easy to make.

Salt ,water and a cool place to cure it for a couple weeks...Much better than any store bought stuff...

Bud

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Oh my goodness you all inspired me!! I stayed home from work yesterday and made cabbage rolls!!!!

I stole from all of your recipes and added a little of my own...

I used venison and mixed it with rice, onion, garlic, egg and spices. For the sauce I cracked open a jar of my home canned tomatoes. I roughly chopped them up and put them with onion, garlic and some butter. I brought it to a simmer and let it thicken up a bit. Then I added a splash of vinegar and a little red wine.

My husband declared it a keeper!!!

Thank you to everyone!

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I don't think I like cabbage rolls but this thread is inspiring me for some reason. Maybe because it is all cold and gray these days - It just sounds "homey". But then again I thought I didn't like cauliflower but then I read 14 pages of the Roasted Cauliflower thread and now I'm an addict!

So - I'll be making some today to cook for dinner tomorrow night. I'm going to use the Molly Stevens recipe. It says it serves 6 - 8 so we'll have lots left over (as there are just 2 of us). I want to make the recipe as is before halving it so........

I have a question about freezing them.

Do you freeze AFTER cooking? Or BEFORE cooking?

Thanks!

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.

. . .

.

I have a question about freezing them.

Do you freeze AFTER cooking? Or BEFORE cooking?

Thanks!

I froze mine after cooking and just the other day re-heated a single serving and it was still very good.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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I freeze after cooking in ziplock bags and it's perfect.


---------------------------------------

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Swedish-style stuffed cabbage rolls (aka "Kåldomer")

Thought I'd add a slightly different approach to most of the cabbage rolls I've seen here so far.

Ingredients:

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About 1/3 cup short-grained rice, 1 1/2 pounds gound beef/pork mix (70/30), one cup water, about 1 1/2 cups whole milk, two onions, an egg, a knob of butter, a few tablespoons of golden syrup (light corn syrup would work fine), about 1 1/2 cups stock (veal here), one head of winter cabbage.

Start by bringing a large pot of water to a boil and dumping the cored head of cabbage in. You want to boil it enough until the outer leaves loosen. Peel them off and wait for the next layer. Drain the leaves well.

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Meanwhile, get your rice started. Bring your water to a boil, add rice, cover and reduce heat to a simmer.

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Add the milk after the water has been absorbed (ca 10 minutes).

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Let simmer gently for another 15 minutes or so. You want a rice pudding-like consistency.

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As the rice is finishing, melt the butter in a pan and add the finely diced onion. Leave the heat on medium as you only want to soften the onions.

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Put the cooked rice, onion, ground meats, egg, salt and peppar (to taste) in a bowl...

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... and mix

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(Go ahead and fry up a taste of this mixture to check for seasoning - you don't want to go through all of this trouble only to end up with bland kåldomer!)

Next, stuff your leaves.

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Brown the rolls in butter. I like to wait for a heavy-ish brown as I feel it improves the flavor.

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Place in a deep skillet that will fit all of the rolls and add the syrup and the stock (looks like I added a few tsps of caraway seeds, too). Simmer slightly covered for 30-45 minutes.

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When the rolls are finished, remove them from the skillet and place in a serving dish. Reduce the cooking liquids and adjust seasonings (the sauce should be slightly sweet). Add a little cream if you've got some on hand. Pour the finished sauce over the rolls and serve.

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Served here with a green salad and boiled potatoes. Teamed with a cold, tall glass of lager, cabbage has never been so lucky!

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This is the recipe I outlined on the first page of this thread.

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Has anyone ever tried a vegie version?

JEL mentioned a Polish version that included (along with meat) some wild mushrooms and barley.

I was thinking of starting with those as subs for meat.

Any other suggestions for a vegetarian filling?

If it doesn't sound like a good idea, I may try it with turkey meat instead.

Pam R. did you try the chicken version yet? I would love to know how that comes out?

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Has anyone ever tried a vegie version?

JEL mentioned a Polish version that included (along with meat) some wild mushrooms and barley.

I was thinking of starting with those as subs for meat.

Any other suggestions for a vegetarian filling?

If it doesn't sound like a good idea, I may try it with turkey meat instead.

Pam R. did you try the chicken version yet? I would love to know how that comes out?

Vegetarian Holubsti (cabbage rolls) are traditional for Ukrainians on Sviata Vechera (Holy Supper aka. Christmas Eve feast...)... Filling usually consists of rice, buckwheat or millet with mushrooms.

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They work with tofu, I have some pix of a tofu/chicken version I made last week, which I will upload, but you could also make them with tofu only.

Thanks helenjp, did you like the chicken in there?

Mikeb19, it's good to know that going vegie is a real dish. I have some buckwheat I did not know what to do with it. It's a funny looking grain, but seems like it would make a good meat substitute.

I'll look for some recipes online like that.

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