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ginger chef

Cookbook or cookware shops in central Paris

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taking my brigade on a sabatical trip to gagnaires in december and they want to buy cook books as well. where is there any food book dedicated shops in central paris open on a monday. all recommendations for other cheffy experiences as well recommended. simon

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Librairie Gourmande

Open Mondays. A few minutes walk north from les Halles.

And if you walk, you can pass by the equipment shops of Dehillerin, A Simon, MORA and others.

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Although Paris is a compact city, the area of Les Halles/Librairie Gourmande is not easily within walking distance – a cab journey should take no more than 15 minutes or use the Métro Ligne 1 to get directly from Charles de Gaulle-Etoile or George V (close to the end of rue Balzac on the Champs-Elysées) to Châtelet. Should take less than 20 minutes.

MORA and Librairie Gourmande have maps on their web sites

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Although Paris is a compact city, the area of Les Halles/Librairie Gourmande is not easily within walking distance – a cab journey should take no more than 15 minutes or use the Métro Ligne 1 to get directly from Charles de Gaulle-Etoile or George V (close to the end of rue Balzac on the Champs-Elysées) to Châtelet.  Should take less than 20 minutes. 

MORA and Librairie Gourmande have maps on their web sites

There are three kitchen supply stores on rue Montmartre(metro Les Halles, not Châtelet unless you want to walk a while) as you walk past St. Eustache to the north(on your way to the Librairie Gourmande). Mora seems to me the most expensive with the most off-putting service. E. Simon is a little further along and has better service, better prices. Or, go to E. Dehillerin at 18, rue Coquillère for good prices and wow factor. It is perhaps five minutes walk from Les Halles(walking west from St. Eustache towards the old Bourse). If you are in the area, it might be a good idea to take a walk up rue de Montorgueil(which also has its beginning at St. Eustache--NYT article on churches identifies a Keith Haring tryptich inside) which is a fun walk for its pedestrian, foodie vibe.

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On the subject of cookware shops, it is a little-known fact that the BHV (Bazar de l'Hôtel de Ville) has one of the largest and nicest cookware departments in Europe. It is on the third floor and it even has a professional section.

Quite easy to reach from Gagnaire's since all you have to do is take the métro, line 1, straight to Hôtel de Ville.

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The gallery Fraîche Attitude in the 10th arrondissement is set to open Food a " foodothèque' or library of information dedicated to cusine with a selection of works in both French and English by Claude Deloffre.

Fraîche Attitude

60 rue du Fg Poissonnière 75010 Paris

www.fraichattitude.fr


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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As a dedicated, but amateur, French pastry chef, I have bought a lot of cookware, molds, etc., made by the company Matfer. I shlepped many things home from Paris, bought at all the stores mentioned here (Mora, Simon, Bovida, and BHV). The first three are my favorite toy stores in Paris, and the shops G. Detout (pastry supplies) and Epicerie de Bruno are close by in the rue Tiquetonne. Then I made a useful discovery.

There is a North American distributor with almost the entire Matfer line, sold over the Internet at significantly lower prices than in Paris.

It is less fun than shopping here, but a real savings.

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I have actually found that Mora has the best prices, while E. Dehillerin and Bovida compete for MORE expensive. Across Etienne Marcel from Bovida is A.Simon which is the hands down winner for MOST expensive.

The thing I like about Mora is that ALL of their goods have prices on them. At the other places you have to pick each thing item, then get someone to look it up, or dig through and epic sized book of 8 digit numbers.


"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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I have actually found that Mora has the best prices, while E. Dehillerin and Bovida compete for MORE expensive. Across Etienne Marcel from Bovida is A.Simon which is the hands down winner for MOST expensive.

The thing I like about Mora is that ALL of their goods have prices on them. At the other places you have to pick each thing item, then get someone to look it up, or dig through and epic sized book of 8 digit numbers.

I agree completely, Braden. But in any case, if one is not familiar with the dreaded "H.T." on the price tag, you will be surprised at that cash register when the VAT is added. I assume that the value added tax is the reason why prices over the Internet in the US/Canada for French cookware are cheaper than buying in France.

I was actually in that neighborhood today with an American couple I met at a dinner Saturday night nearby. I was showing them G. Detout and Bruno, although unfortunately Bruno is only open Thurs-Sat, and these folks leave Paris tomorrow. This was after a tour of the boulangerie Veronique Mauclerc in the 19th. It is one of the few with a wood-fired oven, and she says she is the only woman baker in France to have one in her bakery.

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