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Buffalo Wings


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I love a purist. Nice work pork.

They should really be served RIGHT THEN, hot. But since I was going to a party I let the wings cool on a wire rack. Any attempt to "keep them hot" will result in the nuclear hot insides steaming the crispy skin you spent so much time making. Better cold and crisp in my book. To be fair though, buffalo wings simply do not travel well and do not keep well. (They don't spoil, they just dry out.) So you're better off making them when you're hosting the party.

I have a solution that works.

I had to fry the wings an hour before our super bowl party. Let them cool. Five minutes before everyone arrived I melted the butter in a 12" pan on the stove, mixed in the hot sauce and a pinch of salt, then added the wings and tossed them in the pan with the sauce just long enough to heat them up. Worked great.

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What?  You went to the store on superbowl morning and they didn't have the wings prepared that way, just whole chicken wings?  Don't fret, you can do it yourself.  I prepped 10 lbs (4.5 kg) this way in about 20 minutes.  You just need a sharp chef's knife or boning knife.

I've found kitchen shears actually work best for this. You grip the back indent with one side of the shear and the front with the other and just snip. Much cleaner cut 90% of the time.

When you first put them in, they will occasionally want to stick to the bottom of the basket.  Wait at least a minute or two before dislodging the pieces, or you will tear the skin.  With a commercial fryer, you can dislodge them by pulling the basket out, waiting a few seconds for it to drain, and bashing the basket against the backsplash of the fryer in a stabbing motion.  I don't recommend this with a home fryer.  Use long metal tongs.

Suspend them in the oil for 10 seconds before dropping them so they form a non-stick skin. Easiest way to do this is to drop them in using the spider.

DO NOT EVEN THINK ABOUT RANCH DRESSING.

I love ranch dressing.  Just don't put it on my beloved wings, ok?  Put your wife to work and have her make some blue cheese dressing.  You didn't go to all that trouble to drench these fuckers in stale Kraft cheese and sodium benzoate, did you?

What if I make my own home-made ranch dressing? :sad:

PS: I am a guy.

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So Pork ....  you gotta be from Buffalo, to do those so pure, so right. (?)

Acually I am from the DC area, with Pittsburgh and Philly ties. I learned them from a guy from Buffalo. He opened a bar in Blacksburg, VA called "PK's" back in 1992 or so. He taught me the basic recipe and I've been a disciple of the pure wing ever since. Thanks though! :smile:

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I've found kitchen shears actually work best for this.

I will have to try this next time I have to cut them myself.

Suspend them in the oil for 10 seconds before dropping them so they form a non-stick skin. Easiest way to do this is to drop them in using the spider.

What keeps them from sticking to the spider? :laugh:

What if I make my own home-made ranch dressing?

shhhhh! ok you can use homemade ranch, but don't tell anyone I said so ABSOLUTELY NOT! :raz:

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Very nice. I've been to the Anchor Bar and being someone who LOVES wings but hasn't really had good ones here in San Diego, I thoroughly enjoyed my double order. I've been wanting to make my own wings and your post has inspired me to give it a go. Thanks.

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I really really want that fryer. My god. I did buffalo wings for the first time the other night and mostly followed this. (of course I made them before I saw this). Thanks for the walk through!

Marlene

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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Fantastic demo pork. I like making these at home as well, but I don't have a badass deep fryer like yours. What I use is a pretty large, heavy cast iron skillet. I've never used a thermometer to see whether or not the oil is hot enough; I just used the method of holding my hand over the oil and when it "feels right" to the palm of my hand, in go the wings (or whatever I'm frying). Then I make the buffalo sauce from Frank's Hot sauce, cayenne, a few drops of Tabasco, melted butter and sometimes a whole crushed clove of garlic and let those simmer for a few minutes. Then, when the wings are done--about 10-15 minutes--I drain them and coat them the same way you do. I agree, they really don't travel well.

My blue cheese dipping sauce (great as a salad dressing as well) is comprised of:

Equal parts blue cheese, purchased whole and then crumbled, buttermilk, mayonnaise, and sour cream (I usually do 8 ounces each, but have been known to do 16 ounces each since it keeps well), the juice of one lemon, a few drops of Tabasco Sauce, cracked black pepper, and salt to taste. One caveat is that I had assumed that today's supermarket buttermilk was the same all over, but an acquaintance in New York said that using the exact proportions described above, hers came out too thin. When I make it, it's always nice and creamy and thick. It appears that Washington DC area supermarket buttermilk is thicker than what she purchased in New York (I think she said she picked it up at a supermarket called Albertson's, which we don't have here).

Glad to see that you've demystified this great snack and inspired people to make these at home.

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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Shalmanese,

Please dont make ranch.. Strictly blue cheese is really the only way.. I offered a feta and a blue cheese dip this Super Bowl.. The feta was an interesting addition.. But Ranch is just out. If you dont like blue cheese, then just put big chunks in the dip and eat around it.. :biggrin:

Edited by Daniel (log)
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I don't care for bleu cheese either and use Ranch instead.

The wings still taste great.

 

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Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Whoa. That fryer is IT.

I love wings; my faves outside of mine are from Mr. Spots in Ann Arbor. I've been to the Anchor Bar once and it was not the revelation I expected. Sauce is only OK, and their wings were actually too big: too much meat. I prefer medium or even smallish wings to get a more agreeable skin/meat ratio.

I find that sauteeing a little garlic and black pepper in the butter before adding the sauce gives them a nice flavor, and lately I've been brining them and then drying them in the fridge overnight, which makes makes them uniformly seasoned and crispy.

Thanks for the walk-through, Pork.

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Whoa. That fryer is IT.

I love wings; my faves outside of mine are from Mr. Spots in Ann Arbor. I've been to the Anchor Bar once and it was not the revelation I expected. Sauce is only OK, and their wings were actually too big: too much meat. I prefer medium or even smallish wings to get a more agreeable skin/meat ratio.

I find that sauteeing a little garlic and black pepper in the butter before adding the sauce gives them a nice flavor, and lately I've been brining them and then drying them in the fridge overnight, which makes makes them uniformly seasoned and crispy.

Thanks for the walk-through, Pork.

You and I are on the same page as far as the size of the wings goes, Meez. I love the crispiness of the medium-small size, myself. When I get them out they are of the huge-but-rubbery style more often than not and I will tend to reject them based on texture even before the taste begins to enter the picture.

Here's how I learned to make Buffalo wings (conceit: this came from a friend who attended college in the opposite part of NYS, Troy, in the early 80's. Probably not Anchor Bar style but still pretty authentic to us Long Island kids at that time):

- We deep fry the (smallish) wings in a wok

- 50/50 Franks to Tabasco along with the butter, plus a shot of Italian dressing (which seems to be key). Powdered Cayenne or crushed piquin are used to go 'atomic'.

- Drain the wings on paper towels before adding them and the sauce to a plastic milk-shake shaker with a sealed top- give a good shake before serving.

- I don't see the point of the whole blue cheese vs. ranch discussion. Both are superfluous to me. (That means my wife gets double the sauce :wink: .)

I do like the idea of drying the wings overnight, but not so long ago somebody suggested dredging them in corn starch prior to deep frying. It gives a VERY crispy end result and allows the sauce to adhere in a much better way. I LOVE them that way, although the whole point of doing it only lasts about 5 minutes. Then they lose that quality. But if you're going to eat them immediately that's the way to go.

Edited by TongoRad (log)

aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

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Nice run-through on the preparation of buffalo wings pork - the pictures really drove the points home. I make buffalo wings the virtually the same way, save with really drying the disjointed wings well with towels and shaking in a bag of seasoned flour (Ziploc, flour, salt, fresh white pepper, touch of cayenne). Other than that our recipes are the same and I have never been to Buffalo, just learned that way years ago.

Liked seeing the baking rack method for bringing them to a party. I am the same way and have only made them right on the spot in small batches - usually keep the party on the small side and do single batches for each person.

One quick question, do you ever have a problem with the wing sauce breaking or seperating once the wings are coated. Considering it is just melted butter and Frank's (I usually add a touch of Tabasco for a little more heat depending on preference) - the taste is great but when the wings come out of the oil, it seems the heat will "break" the coating sauce a bit - if wings are left uneaten, the sauce is seperated at he bottom of the bowl or serving plate after a while. Not that big a deal considering there is not often even one straggler left behind.

I have close to the identical blue cheese sauce recipe, but think that the kind of blue cheese does make a difference - there are some poor commercial products and have been disappointed with the lack of flavor in a few and the "crumbles" purchased by other would-be shoppers in attempt to make things easier. A locally-made blue cheese(s) in New England is Great Hill Blue (also there is a Berkshire Blue, a good second option) which are in the same league as a Maytag.

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Lots of good variation suggestions, thanks everyone. I write like a rabid purist, but that's really just my extremely dry sense of humor. It doesn't translate to text that well. As always, "eat what you like" is king in my mind.

One quick question, do you ever have a problem with the wing sauce breaking or separating once the wings are coated.

I usually don't make the sauce mild enough (i.e. with enough butter) to have it noticably separate. The sauce does change consistency rapidly after deployment though, which is part of why they don't travel that well. I think the pungent off-gassing of acetic acid from the hot vinegar is key to the experience, which is lost after 15 minutes at most. That's why I don't think I'll bother to make them "to go" any more.

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  • 7 months later...
I hate margarine.  A lot.  But Buffalo wings don't taste right without it.  Just butter won't do.  I wish it would, but it won't.  Here's what you do.

Melt margarine with a little butter.  Add Frank's hot sauce to taste.  Deepfry wings to very crisp.  Toss wings with sauce. Pop into 500 degree oven for a minute or two to infuse wings and sauce.  Eat.  Try not to make animalistic noises.  Fail. 

That's it.  No spices.  No nothing.  Anything else and you'll have tasty wings, but not Buffalo wings.  Don't forget the blue cheese.  Ranch dressing is an abomination, a CMD (condiment of mass destruction).

I have been asked to make Buffalo wings, the problem is they need to be really simple. I like this recipe above because it doesn't have spices added. Things like various pepper powders and powdered garlic and onion are very hard to find in Japan and my students balk at having to buy a bunch of ingredients they don't know what to do with.

So I need some answers. :biggrin:

Butter or margarine? mixture?

What kind of hot sauce? most recipes say Frank's or a Louisiana hot sauce, I am not familiar with anything except Tabasco. :hmmm: What is the difference? In Japan tabasco is widely available though I have seen a Crystal brand at the 100 yen ($1) shops.

Do you mix the butter and hot sauce togther? One recipe I read has you dip them in the butter first and then the hot sauce..

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Butter or margarine? mixture?

I never use margarine, but given the price of butter in Japan, I'd say go for the margarine.

What kind of hot sauce? most recipes say Frank's or a Louisiana hot sauce, I am not familiar with anything except Tabasco. :hmmm:  What is the difference? In Japan tabasco is widely available though I have seen a Crystal brand at the 100 yen ($1) shops.

I think Tabasco would be too vinegary. I can't remember what Frank's tastes like, though, so I could be wrong.

Do you mix the butter and hot sauce togther? One recipe I read has you dip them in the butter first and then the hot sauce..

I used to mix. I haven't made them in years, though, so I could be remembering incorrectly.

I used to bake my wings, too, instead of frying them.

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"What kind of hot sauce? most recipes say Frank's or a Louisiana hot sauce, I am not familiar with anything except Tabasco. What is the difference? In Japan tabasco is widely available though I have seen a Crystal brand at the 100 yen ($1) shops."

Crystal Sauce is great for wings--I prefer it to Franks--and it's hard to find here in the US lately--I guess because it's all being sent to Japan!!!

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I hate margarine.  A lot.  But Buffalo wings don't taste right without it.  Just butter won't do.  I wish it would, but it won't.  Here's what you do.

Melt margarine with a little butter.  Add Frank's hot sauce to taste.  Deepfry wings to very crisp.  Toss wings with sauce. Pop into 500 degree oven for a minute or two to infuse wings and sauce.  Eat.  Try not to make animalistic noises.  Fail. 

That's it.  No spices.  No nothing.  Anything else and you'll have tasty wings, but not Buffalo wings.  Don't forget the blue cheese.  Ranch dressing is an abomination, a Here's a recipe.CMD (condiment of mass destruction).

I have been asked to make Buffalo wings, the problem is they need to be really simple. I like this recipe above because it doesn't have spices added. Things like various pepper powders and powdered garlic and onion are very hard to find in Japan and my students balk at having to buy a bunch of ingredients they don't know what to do with.

So I need some answers. :biggrin:

Butter or margarine? mixture?

What kind of hot sauce? most recipes say Frank's or a Louisiana hot sauce, I am not familiar with anything except Tabasco. :hmmm: What is the difference? In Japan tabasco is widely available though I have seen a Crystal brand at the 100 yen ($1) shops.

Do you mix the butter and hot sauce togther? One recipe I read has you dip them in the butter first and then the hot sauce..

You're fortunate in that your instincts are leading you towards a great batch of wings. Truly excellent Buffalo wings (and I binged on them this weekend) don't involve spices and powedered garlic -- just margarine and Franks, melted together. Do not use butter!

Franks, btw, is less hot but more tangy hot sauce than Tbasco. I think Crystal would be a reasonable substitute.

I'm on the pavement

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I got my recipe from America' Test Kitchen.

Sauce is Franks Lousiana Hot Sauce with some butter, a bit of cider vinegar, and some Tobasco.

The wings are lightly dredged in corn starch that's been seasoned with salt, black pepper, and cayanne pepper.

Fry in peanut oil. I use a big 7 quart LeCrueset. I let them drain on a rack over a sheet pan, then toss them with the sauce in a stainless steel bowl. You can hold cooked, unsauced wings in an oven if you are cranking them out faster than people are eating them.

Everyone raves about my wings. Are they "complex"? No. But I think they are good examples of what people expect wings to taste like.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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