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John Talbott

Oct 07 – Afaria, Pierre, Garance, Clocher, Bon Acc

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Oct 07 – Afaria, Pierre au Palais Royale, Garance, Le Clocher Pereire, Au Bon Acceuil, l’Ami Jean, Le Carré des Vosges, l’Ordonnance, La Clarisse, Le Passage Gourmet, La Marlotte

Grey is the new black and Afaria is the new Spring.

6.9 Afaria, 15, rue Desnouettes in the 15th, 01.48.56.15.36, closed Sunday and Monday lunch, is the new Spring, i.e., everybody is talking about it, l’Express, Figaroscope, A Nous Paris, etc. Well, I can see why. The RFC and I had lunch on a dreary fall day, in this dreary area near Convention, where there are almost more pretty, pregnant ladies than in the 11th, and we actually talked as much about the food as about the pulchritudinous scenery. I showed up in black jeans, tee and leather jacket, he in a grey tee, jeans and black wind-cheater, and he quickly informed me that grey was the new black, OK, but he agreed that the new black was also black. This place is another funny (in the good sense) blend of new/old, Basque/world, light/overwhelming, exciting/reassuring food that I found below at Pierre…… see below. I entered a bit early and on every mirror was written the wines, by the glass (4 E), 50 cl carafe (8 E) and bottle (you name it) from all the regions plus Sunny-land. Being Amurican, and knowing that the RFC always got delayed doing some act of Christian charity or diverted by some slug in a wine bar (it turned out to be the latter), I ordered a ½ of the house white – not bad, not bad at all. I said the place was funny; there’s a menu with groupings of three dishes (1st, main, dessert) for several rubrics (Sud, voyage, small plates, things for two to share and noble, not Nobel, dishes). Except for the nobles, it runs one 19 for two to 27 E for three dishes. Then there’s an ardoise of 14 “tapas” – everything from peppers to potatoes. Plus there’s a plat du jour for 15 E, which our day was a huge piece of fish (I thought it was fowl it looked so tempting) on tarbais beans. Like Ze Kitchen Galerie’s confusing list of planchas, etc., one just orders and they work out the math. OK, we started with three “tapas”, much too much, the fried accra (cod) balls in a cone were very good, the duck hearts in a garlic/parsley sauce had to be tried but the chipirons, fried, yet again, {in what I always thought was a Northern (Flemish) sabot} were divine. The two old guys next to us were so impressed they had to ask “What dat be?” Oh yes, the bread, albeit Banette, was edible. Then we had a “dish to share” (listed at something like 10.50 E,) incredible falling-off-the-bone confited pork spare ribs with a wonderful side bowl of fall veggies (carrots, leeks, parsnips, turnips, onions, cabbage – a meal in itself.) Stuffed, we repaired to the huge shared table for 8 at the front by the bar – I suspect because the RFC thought he could cop a smoke there, but no, so we repaired outside to two of the, I would guess, ten seats to finish our, what number, bottle of wine, coffees, pear and almond cookies. The tariff – I kid you not – for much, too much, very good food and wine – 110 E. Any detracting element?; yes, the old (my age) Americans taking flash photos of all their food.

Should you go? Well try Spring first, but after you get rejected (don’t take it personally), come here.

The Kings (Jean-Paul Arabian & David Fremondiere) are gone and living well; long live the Kings (Eric Sertour & Pascal Bataille - ex-l'Arôme + l'Ami Marcel)

6.8 Pierre au Palais Royal, 10, rue de Richelieu in the 1st, 01.47.07.58.57, closed Saturday for lunch and Sundays, this week got 4/5 blocks from Philippe Toinard in A Nous Paris and 2/4 hearts from Emmanuel Rubin of Figaroscope and I can see why; it’s terrific, elegant but serving gusty food! I went with my friend/colleague/host when I crash in New York, who was doing a consultation a few blocks away, so I wanted a place he wouldn’t have to schlep too far for and it was perfect. He arrived a bit before me, settled in with a kir and the room started filling by 12h30 and was chock-a-block by 13h00. There were a few Anglos but the majority were locals. The food is an interesting blend of traditional, neo and fusion. Let me explain. For a first he had the sautéed cepes (5 E extra) and I the rillons (cold) of beef cheeks and tail. Both were classic and very good. Then he had a classic tete de veau with gribiche sauce while I had something called a tempura of plaice fish that was almost like the fish in good fish n’ chips, with tartare sauce on a bed of Japanese veggies/seaweed/etc and wasabi. Finally, we shared a deconstructed pannacotta with a small ball of ice cream. We had no bottled water or coffee, but a bottle of excellent wine. Without the kir and cepes supplement our bill would have come under the magic 100 € number. NB there were two entrée specials and two main specials that can be had as part of the very big menu-carte costing 39 for three and 33 € for two courses.

Go again? I plan on dragging Colette here next month.

It is what it is and what it is, is pretty good, sauf being the local Casa de Peepee.

6.4 Garance, 96, quai de Jemmapes in the 10th, 01.42.02.87.95, closed Mondays with an 18 € 3-course “menu” and wines starting at 15 € a bottle is indeed a “pleasant surprise,” to quote Emmanuel Rubin. I went on a glorious sunny Sunday when there was no “menu” but there sure were plenty of people, by 1:30 it was completely full and the crowd spilled out almost to the Canal St Martin. The tables and chairs are post-modern, the wait-staff all in tight black and the food quite, quite good. The menu (both put on the ardoise and printed), states that they buy and serve fresh products and I believe them. I started with the very good, fried chipirons that had an intriguing batter, a layer of tapenade on the slate plate, diced veggies and seeds to put on top, one of which was fennel. I then had an almost raw (as requested) piece of veal liver with dribbles of reduced balsamic and a carrot concoction – also very good – with great fries. On a roll, I ordered three homemade ices – Guatemala coffee, salty caramel and rum raisin, again super. No problems? Well, the folks on the terrace (aka sidewalk) were nicotine addicted and the wind instead of blowing from Vichy as it did for Bogie, blew straight into the resto. Also, for a while, the number of non-dining folks dropping in to pee exceeded those seeking tables so it was like Grand Central. And the bread is nothing to write home about, but who cares? The bill = 49 €, but on a weekday for two with one bottle of wine and 2 coffees (but no bottled water) it’d be 55 €; beat that!

Should one go? How can you not love a place that plays the “Buena Vista Social Club” CD non-stop?

Way out, in all senses of the expression.

6.2 N* Le Clocher Pereire, 42, bvd Pereire in the 17th, 01.44.40.04.15 was heralded by Emmanuel Rubin as the first nice surprise of the rentrée and I’d have to agree. Funnily enough I seem to have had the same meal he did, which may explain part of our shared enthusiasm. It’s a really really nice looking place, thoroughly comfortable among all the residential and business buildings of the Boulevard Pereire (unlike the Buffalo Grill down the road apiece.) Unlike many one-man band places this size (about 26 covers), there is not one but three young men in the cuisine and only Madame in front. But the service only was pressed when the place was full at 13h30; until then the food flowed out without a hitch. The bread looked industrial but was excellent, the wine selection fine and the coffee was Illy. Three dishes are 29 at lunch (5 each of starters, mains & desserts); but an OK menu (that day consisting of a terrine, tete de veau and crème caramel) was available for 17 €. I began with another hot/lukewarm/coolish (is this a trend?) mound of cepes (bound with egg) atop simpler chopped cepes with sauce; absolutely delicious (ER said “pas mal.") Then I had the melt-in-your-mouth rabbit with confited lemon (which I did not get much of a sense of) with a little pastille packet of rabbit morsels with raisins: wonderful (ER “agreeable"). I terminated with the moelleux of chocolate, this was gold standard or close. The crowd was all French and quite eclectic, many suits, two worker-types, two “working girls” with handler and a guy next to me pitching another spectacle on the Beatles by singing some of their songs that are timeless. Any drawbacks: yes, 5 women smoking pretty non-stop with inadequate ventilation (but 2008 is creeping in) and it is a bit of a schlep from the Metro or bus. The bill with ½ bottle of red, no bottled water and a coffee = 45 €.

Should one go? This is a place as Pudlo used to say “worth following.”

Back to the status quo ante.

6.0 Au Bon Acceuil, coordinates well known, was a regular place for my gang for years, but after Jacques Lacipiere decamped for {Chez} Les Anges around the corner, we drifted away. Once again the menu-carte is 27 € but as before, the more interesting mains are on the carte (eg ris de veau and pigeonneau) and are a heckova lot more than that. So while we three ate OK for 142 € with two bottles of Chinon and coffee but only Chat. Delanoye for water, to break off to the more interesting stuff would really have upped the end-sum. Anyway, we had three different entrees – a green salad with parmesan, a terrine of guinea fowl and foie gras (OK) and their old sautéed mackerel with fantastic fall veggies – two different mains – a gigot with beans which wasn’t raw enough for me despite my request but had great crispy skin and was quite tasty and an equally tasty faux-filet with bok choy (the chef is Japanese, if memory serves me) – then three desserts that were fine, no more – a moelleux, a baba and a raspberry concoction atop a Breton cookie. The bread and sliced sausage seem unchanged from before.

If you loved it before, you’ll like it again, if you hated it…….

You can go home again

5.5 l’Ami Jean, 27, rue Malar in the 7th, 01.47.05.86.89, closed Sundays and Mondays is a place where I had two disappointing meals after it opened and that would normally be that. But so many people on the France Forum, including my charming cohost, have raved about it that I acted abnormally and went back. On entering I was struck by how jammed together the tables were and how much it resembled Le Regalade, which is of course where Stephane Jego came from. The menu, which started below 30 is now 32 for three courses. I had the timbale of escargots, mushrooms and (?) pied de porc with (?) espelette pepper which came of a hot hot plate but was of varying temperatures within, making it rather interesting. Then the paleron of beef which was huge but like the beef in pot-au-feu, not much to write home about save for the wonderful vegetable/condiment that had a spicy chard and carrots and the crisp salty bacon that made it a good dish. I had a dessert described as a tatin of yellow lemon, but it was green and deconstructed, but quite good. The service was so good they poured my carafe of wine into my glass when it needed it. It being game season, there were ample specials that by themselves approached the price of the menu. The one that looked terrific was a casserole of fowl, pork and foie gras.

Should you go? I think this is an ideal place to send 1st time visitors; good chow, authentic surroundings and nice staff.

The Marais: Is it the Jewish or American quarter?

4.0 NNN* Le Carré des Vosges, 15, rue St-Gilles in the 3rd, 01.42.71.22.21, closed Sundays and Mondays, where the 3-course menu is 27 and 2-course one is 21 Euros (3 firsts, mains and desserts). The day I visited was the day after it was reviewed in Figaroscope but although I passed many folk carrying their sukkot plants, the quarter seemed more American than Jewish and the restaurant even more so. I started with a nice tapenade with not so nice bread. Then I had an equally nice langoustine bisque with croutons and cheese that seemed pretty industrial: OK but not surprising. The daurade with piperade was also OK but not mind-exploding. Finally I terminated with a tarte tatin with a firm cookie underneath and splashes of caramel in the corner of the plate and supposedly something made with calvados but I couldn’t taste it. Lunch plus 2 glasses of a fine Gard wine (which came with too long a lecture on it from Madame) but no bottled water or coffee ran 37 €. I do believe English is spoken since there were plenty of them there.

Should one go? If you live nearby but there’ll be no fireworks.

Is there a doctor in the house?

3.8 NNN* l’Ordonnance, 51, rue Hallé in the 14th, 01.43.27.55.85, closed Saturday lunch and Sundays, 3 courses for 29, two for 23 €. The name means prescription not artillery (that’s ordnance) and I’d read that it was the moral equivalent of a hospital canteen, perhaps in Miam, serving the faculty at the two hospitals nearby (Rochefoucauld + Sainte Anne’s, the psych hospital) so I suggested to a French colleague that we hold a planning meeting there. It has a no-smoking room and we were all alone for 2 hours. My friend indicated that it had been a mediocre resto before, called the Auberge du Petit Tonneau, but had really been spiffed up and the carte indicated one dish called sabodet Bobosse, so I thought the chef had probably spent time in Michel Bossard’s Le Quincy kitchen, a good sign. We had a pretty good meal; he had cantaloupe with ham and then veal with wild mushrooms which he deemed pretty good; I had a wonderful cassolette of escargots, industrial and wild mushrooms and a terrific demi-melted chunk of cheese followed by a rather banal civet of duck with the identical sauce with wild mushrooms as he did; our shared mashed potatoes suffered two bites. Our wine (from the Sologne, near from where Quincy comes) was cheap (20 €), fruity and very good with all dishes. But back to the name; it turns out that it’s named not after the nearby hospitals, but after the street it’s on, the rue Hallé (Jean-Noel Hallé was a noted physician of his time who defended Lavoisier, you remember him from Chemistry 1, eh?,) unsuccessfully, alas, before the Convention; he was guillotined in 1794, (now you didn’t recall that did you?), The bill, oh yah, the bill = 71 € for 2 with two menus, two coffees and one wine.

Should one go? Not if you’re schlepping from the Right Bank; but my friend will be back and I’m telling another friend staying at the nearby Marriott to go.

Reaching for a star and….ah….falling

3.6 La Clarisse, 29, rue Surcouf in the 7th, 01.45.50.11.10, closed Saturday lunch and Sundays is wonderful reincarnation of the nothing place La Gourmandine. It’s beautiful, the staff are terrific and for a top of the line resto in this part of the 7th, with a menu of three courses for 38 and two for 31 €, how could they miss? Plus the chef used to be at the Ferme St Simon and I ate well there. Well, let me start with the clientele and sound-dampening; the day I was there two American dot-comers, two French buyers of software and one Brit who seemed in the middle, talked non-stop at the top of their voices some 30 feet from me and the acoustics, like in Chartres, enabled their loud conversation to go bingo into my ears (and yes I tried other secluded corners to no avail). Then let’s go to the wonderfully priced “menu” – very reasonable but only two choices for firsts (eggs with boudin noir vs halfcooked salmon with sliced potatoes on a bed of ratatouille – actually quite tasty); mains (an uninteresting sounding fish dish and a tough pheasant that was also banal and tasteless – a tough combo to achieve); and desserts (an assortment of ice creams or what was described as cooked apples like a tarte tatin – which was nothing of the sort – it was OK, but was in reality a pile of cream/baked apple/what we call a lace cookie at our joint/more baked apple and a ball of caramel ice cream on top). I can just see taking my foursome here and having them balk at the choices, look at the carte (18 for firsts, 32 for mains and 12 € for desserts) – and never forgive me. The bill for the three-course menu, plus two glasses of red wine and no water or coffee = 54 €.

Should one go? Do you have a full-body cast, live 2 steps away and love poor price-quality places?

Ohmagawd, don’t try for what you can’t deliver.

0.5 Le Passage Gourmet, ex-Le Passage, 126, rue de l’Abbe Groult in the 15th, 01.48.42.40.60, open 12-12 7/7, has had a new patron since May and its chef ex-Cagna, has a supposedly Southern-inspired menu that has seemed to escape the attention of the big boys {now I know why} despite a lunch formula of 13.90 € and a daily special at 10.90 €. It lists itself, as I say, as open 12-12 7/7 and as a restaurant, lounge, tea salon and all-around great place (they’ve got signs outside on the Passage Dombasle in at least four places) - that should have been a warning, but no, too imbecilic to watch the omens, I plunged on. My charming co-host (CCH) and I set out to remedy the paucity of reviews. And if I do say so myself, we tried our very best. I arrived a bit before she, as is my wont, was stunned by the redecoration of a pretty big salle and huge terrace, some enclosed and heated, some outside; and ordered the cheapest wine on the carte – a Buzet, at 15 €, which the CCH, knowing more than I about wine, declared “pas mal” indeed, quite good. We took a long time deciding on what to order. The well-publicized 13.90 menu was an endive salad with blue cheese followed by a pintade forestiere with veggies and endives (could I have misheard that?) Nope. So to the carte. The CCH ordered a first that turned out to be much too much and much too pathetic sushis (a sort of dumbed-down Fresh Fields display) with (OK) mache and mango fragments and I had two chicken yakitori things with a mound of avocado called a “cappuccino” (I didn’t get the latter reference, but she liked it). Oh yah, as an amuse gueule, we had cups of what were also described as “cappuccinos” of veggies with truffles (which with the wine, were the best parts of the meal.) Then she chose the triple-lamb-chop, which was underdone (properly) with a sauce a part of mint (never in 55 years have I had such in France) which was not horrible and I ordered the matelote of eel – sorry we’re out of eel (in the era of printers why was it still on the carte?), so I had the Bresse chicken, described as “Poulet de Bresse... Le vrai... Aux Morilles, Riz Basmati aux petits légumes. Une recette traditionnelle...” Sure! Chicken was tough and tasteless, sauce looked like Asian peanut but was whaaaa?, morilles were OK, rice with veggies just didn’t work. Dessert? Are you kidding? “Run away” as one of my legal advisors cautions me. Don’t you have anything nice to say John? Yes, they have a heckova website. But, despite the bad food, desultory service and incredibly annoying, loud American jazz music, the afternoon was not a total loss with a bill of 94 € and company that was five stars.

Should one go? Do you need a life?

La Marlotte IS dead

-1.0 La Marlotte, 55, rue du Cherche-Midi in the 6th, 01.45.08.86.79, 27 € for two courses at lunch, closed Sundays was given two hearts (which every place in Paris is unless it’s dead, but I’m coming to that) by Emmanuel Rubin with whom I agree 79.01% and his lead-in blurb was entitled “La Marlotte is not dead.” His argument was that this place has been on life support for years and now has been resuscitated by a chef ex-Bastide Odeon, one of my faves over the years. Digression, I have a soft spot in my heart for that old, dead Marlotte, because I came here/there in 1998 with my 3 yo grand-daughter (just the two of us) and they treated her royally, sending over salami (I didn’t tell her it was charcuterie), frites and ice cream. I loved them. Of course, this is a different deal – new millennium, decade, equipe, etc., but, the memories linger on. So OK, I read this review by my guide ER, and I say “Why not?” I’ve got two food-exploratory friends from the Northwest, where food is food, man the Vancouver-Seattle-Portland corridor is culinary heaven. OK, so they blow into town Friday night and I figure this place is 1. serving classic stuff, with a 2. Basque twist and 3. in a place for which my transference (yes, transference can involves places as well as people) is very positive. Friday evening 9 PM until Saturday morning 11 AM, I telephone; “this number does not want your call,” check the number via internet and print, same. So I make a back up rez at l’Agassin, a quick hop on the 92 bus if it’s closed and head out early; it’s wide-open, I reserve, go cancel rez #2, wait for my pals. Place unchanged except lotsa Anglos and tourists from Versailles and Marne-la-Valee, Welcome and service, warm and prompt and a promising prelude of coming attractions, non? (Get to the point Dad!) Well, from there it was downhill all the way. We ordered:

Madame: andouillette (yes, she knows what it is and it’s her favorite dish) so-so and frites actually not bad, and as a first - a green salad;

Monsieur: a cassolette of wild mushrooms (ahright) with an egg more hard than soft boiled followed by the most tasteless rascasse on the planet in a tasteless fluffy sauce;

Me: the same mushies and then tripes a la Marlotte – OK, I’m biased having gone to heaven in Florence with the tripes I had there a few weeks ago, but…… what a difference a thousand plus kilometers makes. But while the food wavered from just OK to unspeakably tasteless, the service went from pleasant and welcoming to non-existent. Madame desperately wanted dessert, indeed, had saved up for it, but the 6 wait-people were nowhere to be found and she and he departed for the Louvre posthaste, I mean 2 ½ hours after entering. In fairness, she and he hesitated ordering and the staff made the traditional response, if you’re not ready, neither are we. But, but, but, one couldn’t catch an eye for dessert, water, wine or check either.

Should one go? Got a car, want a voiturier in tourist/shopping central?

Scale (subject to fickleness and change):

10 - Giradet in the old days.

9 - Ducasse, Bocuse, Loiseau at their prime

8 - Bon Acceuil, Ze Kitchen Galerie, Cerisaie, Constant x3 now

7- Bistro Cote Mer at its flowering best

6 - Cinq Mars

5 - Terminus Nord

4 - 2 Pieces Cuisine

3 - Le Bouclard

2 - Sale + Pepe

1 - le Nord-Sud

0 - Auguste, The Place

Ø- Iode

HS* = outside classification, unfair to rate

N* = a place that if one lived nearby in the neighborhood (N) would be a great place to go but gets a lower grade due to the schlep (perhaps unfairly).

NN* = a place that if one lived nearby (N) in the neighborhood (N) would be a great place to go but gets a lower grade due to the horrible, immense, unpleasant schlep.

NNN* = If I lived nearby it would tilt to the bigger grade.

Edited by John Talbott for ortho.


Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

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A clarification about or a new practice at Afaria. When the RFC and I ate there two weeks ago we had tapas and a main course at a table in the main eating room. Today Colette and I were told that the practice was that one could only order from the carte there and tapas from the ardoise were only eaten at the common table in the bar, where one could also order mains, making it a perfect spot.

Another feature I didn't discover until today is their "house specialty" digestif, a combination of armagnac and pulverized framboise, which I got because I asked for a Basque digestif (thinking of something like Izzara) and was informed this was their ideal - it was, ideal!


John Talbott

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Le Clocher Pereire deserved another (our third) visit and from our place the schlep isn't that bad. We took two French friends from the other side of town who rarely leave the Left Bank and even they didn't complain.

In any case, we four had the 29 E menu and I sampled the foie gras, rare lamb, pied de porc, scallops, chocolate moelleux; all were just fine.

The bill was 165.00 Euros with two bottles of wine, coffe but no bottled water.


John Talbott

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Three of us went back to le Clocher Pereire today* and had another fine meal. The dishes were all suitable for a hot day (24 degrees C.), seasonal and terrific. Our firsts included a crab and puree of fennel mousse timbale with spicy fresh herbs and foie gras toast, risotto with fresh veggies and tomato and turnip slices with a squash blossom stuffed with goat cheese. Then we had rabbit with confited lemon and sundried tomato rollatines with feves; duck breast slices with a toasted envelope and a bland sandre with potato coating and fresh green asparagus. Desserts were two moelleux of chocolate and strawberries with sorbet. With 3 coffees, two bottles of wine and no bottled water our bill was 141 euros.

*Last visited June 23rd, fully paid for except for two prunes offered.


John Talbott

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Three of us went back to le Clocher Pereire today* and had another fine meal.  The dishes were all suitable for a hot day (24 degrees C.), seasonal and terrific.  Our firsts included a crab and puree of fennel mousse timbale with spicy fresh herbs and foie gras toast, risotto with fresh veggies and tomato and turnip slices with a squash blossom stuffed with goat cheese.  Then we had rabbit with confited lemon and sundried tomato rollatines with feves; duck breast slices with a toasted envelope and a bland sandre with potato coating and fresh green asparagus.  Desserts were two moelleux of chocolate and strawberries with sorbet.  With 3 coffees, two bottles of wine and no bottled water our bill was 141 euros.

*Last visited June 23rd, fully paid for except for two prunes offered.

Which of the 2 chefs was cooking that day?

Le clocher is an authentic bistrot.Very good and reasonable and quite sophisticated.I wish we had one in our neighborhood.

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Which of the 2 chefs was cooking that day?

Le clocher is an authentic bistrot.Very good and reasonable and quite sophisticated.I wish we had one in our neighborhood.

Both.

John Talbott

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An update on lunch at Garance on the Canal St Martin where three of us ate on a nice Sunday. I ordered a tempura of calamari on a dusting of piment d’espelette with a homemade tartare sauce for dipping and the three of us declared that while certainly white (a deadly color according to the great food god Atar) it was very good. Then one of the ladies had scallops (sans corals) on top of mixed fall vegetables and the other bass with a side of greens and I the veal liver prepared exactly as I’d asked – blue. The two others shared a moelleux of chocolate with ice cream that were gold standard. With three coffees and a bottle of fine Morgon the bill was 87 Euros.

Then another of our favorites – Le Clocher Periere – where the brothers-in-law, Eric Jolibois and Philippe LeBoeuf, always manage to please and surprise us. I started off with a Bell-jar oeuf en cocotte with foie gras entier, simple, eh? – heaven and moved on to a divine colvert with a puree and polenta in tubes as it were, simple, eh? – ah, and finished with a peche de vignes with a verveine ice on a delicious biscuit with drizzled caramel, simple, eh? – uhn, uhn. Meanwhile my almost diamond anniversary companion/partner/life space occupant had microtomed fall veggies (tomatoes, navets and goat cheese), ombre chavalier and chocolate moelleux with icecream that she said she’d come back for that night. The bill, with one bottle of just fine Bordeaux and two Illy (extra points) coffees = 80 €.


John Talbott

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Does anyone know if Garance is open for dinner on Sundays or just lunch? And is there a menu for dinner on Sunday or just la carte? What are the ball park prices for dinner these days?


Edited by plafield (log)

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Does anyone know if Garance is open for dinner on Sundays or just lunch? And is there a menu for dinner on Sunday or just la carte? What are the ball park prices for dinner these days?

Everyone, including me, says it's only closed Mondays and I believe the "menu" is available only Tues-Fri lunch but a la carte is only about 35 E.

John Talbott

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They're open for lunch Sundays as far as I know --- I've seen the open anyway...


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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I was just walking by and took a look and they are open for both lunch and dinner Saturday and Sunday. I didnt notice any "menu" (but didnt really look too hard) and agree with John that the carte would run about 35 € for 3 courses.


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