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Kerry Beal

Apple Pies -- Bake-Off VIII

29 posts in this topic

Given that it's apple season I've had a suggestion to start an Apple pie bake off. The suggestion was actually for Tarte Tatin, which is one of my personal favorites and a dessert I've been thinking it's time to dust off the pan to make soon.

So in this bake off I think we should include anything apple that morphologically resembles pie - so that would include pies, tarts, and I think that strudels might fit nicely given they have apples and pastry.

Let's talk about what apples you prefer for your pies, and what is it about that apple that works with each recipe. Pastry tips are welcomed and discussion on what pastry works with apples vs the pastry you prefer for other pies.

I've got a brand spanking new copy of Mes Tartes up on the shelf in front of me that I haven't cracked open yet, perhaps I'd better get looking and see what's apple in there.

So drag out your nice shiny Mac's, your Pippens, your Spys, those scabby windfalls and let's get baking!!!

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Good timing Kerry. I've been playing with an idea for a while now that involves pastry layers in between apples (haven't figured out how to keep them crisp, or at least non-soggy, yet). Unfortunately I'll be stuck with whatever my big box market has for apples.

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gfron1, are you thinking about something along the lines of a napoleon? Or will it be something that is baked in layers, rather than being constructed of pre-cooked and pre-baked layers?

Will you be using puff pastry, or filo, or what?

If you are using filo, you can help to keep it crisp with that favorite old technique of sprinkling sugar (or cinnamon-sugar) between the layers of pastry. And pre-cooking the sliced apples on the stovetop would release a lot of the moisture before constructing the layered pastry and baking it.

Assembly just before serving helps, also, if you are making a napoleon type of dessert.

Eileen


Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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Oh man, I knew I should have checked here before all the baking I did today....while eating apples.....

Oh well....

I can't find Northern Spy apples anywhere around here and I hear they make the best pies. I usually do braeburns (or however you spell them) I tried an all granny smith last week that didn't turn out too good in the filling. I cannot seem to get the spice right.


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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I love apple pie, tart, cobbler and crisp..but have never made it myself.

What are the best apples to use for baking? I'd like to try this bake off!

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I'll step up. Thanksgiving here this weekend and that means apple (and pumpkin, but that's another bakeoff :raz: ) pie. Apologies for the webcam pictures, I'm at my parents' house for the weekend and thus cameraless.

gallery_54928_4907_61739.jpg

What's left of what I'm told was a half bushel (but it seemed more than that... :blink: ) bag of cortland apples after...I think 5 apple pies were baked yesterday. Mine today makes 6. I also added a couple McIntosh apples for flavour, but they don't stand up to baking the way I'd prefer. :sad:

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One thing I love about pies is you can play pretty fast and loose with the filling. I didn't measure anything, which was refreshing after messing around with the pastry. I like mine heavy on the spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves) and light on on the (brown) sugar. Some flour too, because there was a lot of juice.

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I used the Cook's Illustrated liquored-up pie crust recipe for my crust. Can't reccommend it enough. Easy to work with and it makes the best pie crust I've ever baked (which, mind you, isn't saying a lot :raz: but it is good.) And I can attest to the fact that it turns out just as well if you mix it by hand.

gallery_54928_4907_28485.jpg

I swirled some egg white in the bottom of the crust to try and seal it against the apples, I have no idea if that makes much of a difference but I was brushing the top with egg white anyway so why not.

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The finished pie. Sorry, no inside shots as I brought it to my grandparents' house, but rest assured it was very very good. :wub::smile:


Kate

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Oh man, I knew I should have checked here before all the baking I did today....while eating apples.....

Oh well....

I can't find Northern Spy apples anywhere around here and I hear they make the best pies. I usually do braeburns (or however you spell them) I tried an all granny smith last week that didn't turn out too good in the filling. I cannot seem to get the spice right.

Next time try your favourite apple and add just two granny smiths to the mix rather than all one type.

With regards to the spice, I finally stopped adding any at all and our family likes it much better. I add some lemon juice to brighten the flavour and of course some sugar and thickener but no spice.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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I used the Cook's Illustrated liquored-up pie crust  recipe for my crust.  Can't reccommend it enough.  Easy to work with and it makes the best pie crust I've ever baked (which, mind you, isn't saying a lot :raz:  but it is good.)  And I can attest to the fact that it turns out just as well if you mix it by hand.

Have you tried Cook's Illustrated's regular pie crust in Baking Illustrated? If you have, how do they compare?


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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gfron1, are you thinking about something along the lines of a napoleon? Or will it be something that is baked in layers, rather than being constructed of pre-cooked and pre-baked layers?

I'm not quite sure, but I was thinking of a whole bunch of layers apple, dough, apple, dough... I don't want to construct it in the end - I want it baked in final format.

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A thread on apple pies isn't complete without mention of Chufi's Apple Pie :wub: which I made again this weekend. It was made and consumed before I saw this bake-off, but since I wasn't happy with the results for once, I'll just have to make another. This time I might use Granny Smith and Pink Lady apples.

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I saw that picture of Chufi's apple pie and and it is beautiful!

I think I will try that mix of braeburns and granny smith, mostly braeburns.

I have been wondering, has anyone tried a making their pie crust with lard?? I never heard of vodka...I just may have to try that...


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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I have been wondering, has anyone tried a making their pie crust with lard?? I never heard of vodka...I just may have to try that...

Check out this topic and this one on pie crusts. Somewhere amongst all those replies you will find comments on using 100% lard. I think Wendy DeBord might have done a test making three pies--one with butter, one with shortening, and one with lard. I might be mistaken about the fats, though.

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Have you tried Cook's Illustrated's regular pie crust in Baking Illustrated? If you have, how do they compare?

Sorry to say I haven't, but next time I'm making pastry I will...that may not be for a while though, I'm sort of pied-out :raz:


Kate

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I usually use lard and butter. Somehow I prefer lard in the pastry rather than shortening. I'm pretty sure ChefPeon uses lard so hopefully she'll chime in.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Ok, i am going to take a go at this. gfron asked me to figure away to make he's idea of the apple and fillo dough concoction. I came up with an idea and am going to try it out. I plan to do what he says but iam not using fillo but rather a regular pie crust with a filling i am going to make. I plan to have a dry filling and as the apple cooks..its moisture will make a kind of syrup sealed in the pie crust. I am thinking and planning as i go with this idea. I have some experience in this, but i am no expert. I will try it out later this week. I have all the supplies already. hopefully all goes well. :cool:

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gfron1, are you thinking about something along the lines of a napoleon? Or will it be something that is baked in layers, rather than being constructed of pre-cooked and pre-baked layers?

I'm not quite sure, but I was thinking of a whole bunch of layers apple, dough, apple, dough... I don't want to construct it in the end - I want it baked in final format.

If your intent is to bake it in the final form, I would recommend the filo layered with sugar (or cinnamon-sugar or sugar/cinn-sugar with finely chopped nuts) between sheets. It helps to keep the layers from getting soggy, and if you pre-cook the apples to reduce the moisture, you should have some success.

I'm curious to know what you decide to do, so please report back!

And ABRA - WHERE ARE YOU ON THIS SUBJECT WITH ALL OF THOSE DELICIOUS LOCAL SOUTHERN FRENC E APPLES COMING INTO MARKET RIGHT NOW?

Eileen


Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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My friend makes a wonderful apple cobbler based on her grandmother's recipe. She said it uses a hot water crust and there's a layer of dough on the bottom, in the middle and on top. The bottom and middle crust are not crisp, but not soggy either. I believe they are layerd with the raw apple filling. I haven't managed to wrangle the recipe out of her yet, despite my multitude of hints.


Edited by shaloop (log)

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I made my first pie of the season after we went apple-picking Sunday. I like to keep a stack of dough disks in the freezer (RL Beranbaum's all butter crust) and thank goodness I had (just) two left. I used a mix of Stayman-Winesap and Cortland apples and I don't think it could have been tastier. Prettier definitely, but the flavor was fantastic. The Staymans are dense-fleshed and don't soften as fast as some so I think I will do the two-stage baking a la Joy of Cooking for the next one so the crust doesn't brown so fast. I like the apples to be very tender.

I'll try for a photo next time. Fern

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Does anyone have an apple pie recipe that does not use sugar? (No sweeteners, either.) The pie of course would be kind of tart, but I like them that way. Thanks.

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I made a Dutch Apple Pie for my Dad's birthday. We're now enjoying the leftovers :biggrin: .

gallery_40681_2239_1194879.jpg

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gallery_34971_5274_31662.jpg

I hope this post makes it!!! I have been trying to post a picture here for a solid hour! :blink:

Sorry the picture is so dark, I am still fighting with my camera and lighting...

I used butter in the crust, and only a little sugar and cinnamon in the filling...

I smells soooooo good....

edit to add: Yeah!!! I did it!!! I got a picture to post!!!!


Edited by CKatCook (log)

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Made my first apple pie ever yesterday - i honey roasted some pecans and incorporated them in along with the apples (cortland and golden delicious) and brushed the crust with a honey/sugar mixture, then sprinkled some small hazelnut pieces that i'd glazed in sugar over the top. Very good!

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Does this count as apple pie?

First I took a small apple, peeled it, cored it, sliced it horizontally.

gallery_41282_4652_1847.jpg

Then I covered each layer with a round of fillo dough, brushed with butter and sprinkled with palm sugar and toasted pecans. The apple was reassembled into its original shape and wrapped in two layers of fillow that were again brushed with butter. Loose ends were tucked into the core opening at the top and a cinnamon stick shoved in for flavor and holding.

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Baked at 350 for a while and just before finished brushed with a mixture of egg white and corn syrup.

I didn't have any expectations so I was pleased

gallery_41282_4652_1606.jpg

And here's the guts shot

gallery_41282_4652_14030.jpg

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Does this count as apple pie?

. . .

Whatever it is called I know I would enjoy it much more than an apple pie. :smile:


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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