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I just got a new job baking at a spa that has just opened up in the PA mountains.

I need recommendations for a good book for baking (bread etc) with whole grains and flours other than AP (spelt etc)

can anyone recommend one or two?

thanks

I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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I just got a new job baking at a  spa that has just opened up in the PA mountains.

I need recommendations for a good book for baking (bread etc) with whole grains and flours other than AP (spelt  etc)

can anyone recommend one or two?

thanks

There is a thread here on Peter Rinehart's Whole Grain baking book: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=106329

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This book from King Arthur Flour is supposed to be very good:

http://www.amazon.com/Arthur-Flour-Whole-G...g/dp/0881507199

I agree - I've made quite a few things from this book and they have been good!

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This book from King Arthur Flour is supposed to be very good:

http://www.amazon.com/Arthur-Flour-Whole-G...g/dp/0881507199

I agree - I've made quite a few things from this book and they have been good!

You know, you were one of the people I thought of when I suggested this book. I read your blog often, and noticed a lot of your recipes came from or were adapted from this book. And... your recipes always sound great, not to mention your beautiful photos!

Edited by merstar (log)
There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
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In addition to the KA volume – from which I’ve made, thus far, only the Devil’s Food Cake & Scottish Shortbread – you may consider the purchase of one or more of these titles:

Bob's Red Mill Baking Book by John Ettinger

Hodgson Mill Whole Grain Baking (Fair Winds Press, 2007)

Local Breads: Sourdough and Whole-Grain Recipes from Europe's Best Artisan Bakers by Daniel Leader

Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand by Beatrice Ojakangas

The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread by Bette Hagman

The Spelt Cookbook by Helga Hughes

"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

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Thanks everyone for the information

I just purchased from amazon, Peter Rinehart's Whole Grain baking book

And I will check out the others.

Edited by thebaker (log)

I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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I'd suggest you might take a look at Dan Lepard's "The Handmade Loaf" - plenty there using non-ordinary and wholemeal flours.

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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Thanks everyone for the information

I just purchased from amazon, Peter Rinehart's Whole Grain baking book

And I will check out the others.

Head to your local library and literally "check" them out. I almost always do this before deciding on a purchase since books can be so costly.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Thanks everyone for the information

I just purchased from amazon, Peter Rinehart's Whole Grain baking book

And I will check out the others.

Head to your local library and literally "check" them out. I almost always do this before deciding on a purchase since books can be so costly.

Thats what I have done in the past, but since I moved out of NYC no such luck,

my small town library is not the same at all...

I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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I would like to add one of my favorites to the list..

Maggie Glezer's Artisan Baking Across America, published in 2000.

It was released in paperback in 2005, same photos, same text.

On page 82 is Essential's Columbia, a "Country French-Style bread" that is as close to perfect as any multi-grain bread I have ever made (and I have been baking since 1955 when I started working in my mom's bakery in Wisconsin).

And, although not whole grain, there is a section devoted to the detailed instructions and list of ingredients for Acme's Rustic Baguettes.

The section on Specialty Breads has a wonderful Finnish Rye Bread, identified as "Advanced" and so it is. But worth the effort.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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