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armchairchef

Baking pan conversions

8 posts in this topic

Does anyone know a way to convert a quick bread recipe from a regular loaf pan size to one that will work in mini loaves?

Is there a formula somewhere?

I often see recipes that say you can put the batter in either a loaf pan or a muffin tin, but rarely does it say "mini loaf pans."

Thanks!

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Does anyone know a way to convert a quick bread recipe from a regular loaf pan size to one that will work in mini loaves?

Is there a formula somewhere?

I often see recipes that say you can put the batter in either a loaf pan or a muffin tin, but rarely does it say "mini loaf pans."

Thanks!

I do it by calculating the total volume and then do the division. Figure the volume og the big pan (l+d+w=V) then mesure one of the small pans the same way. L/S=yeild.


Living hard will take its toll...

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From the excellent site baking911.com: Baking pan substitutes. There is an extensive chart, plus instructions for any other pan.

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Nice chart; worth a bookmark!

Generally, I find that a recipe making one 'normal' size loaf will make 3 or 4 minis, depending on mini pan size. If the normal loaf bakes for an hour, start checking the minis at about 35 minutes.

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I've got a recipie for a white butter cake that calls for a 9" wide 2" deep pan and a temperature of 350 for 23-25 minutes.

I would like to make mini cakes in a 4" wide pan. What adjustments should I make in time and temperature?

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Temp: same

Time: 'til done

Seriously. Not being a smartass. When they start looking and smelling like they might be about done give 'em the ol' toothpick test. You can always keep track of how long it takes for a future ballpark reference.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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You're going to want to increase your baking powder a little for the smaller cakes. Seems counterintuitive, I know, but according to RLB: the larger the pan size, the less baking powder is used in proportion to other ingredients. This is because of surface tension. The larger the diameter of the pan, the slower the heat penetration and the less support the rising cake receives because the sides are further from the center. Baking powder weakens the cake's structure by enlarging the air spaces, so decreasing baking powder strengthens the structure and compensates for retarded gelatinization and the decrease in support.

I have a cocoa cake that I bake in 6 inch pans (adapted from a recipe for larger cakes), last time I used 1-1/4 tsp baking powder instead of 1 tsp and they rose higher with less doming. I'm tired of wasting the domes!


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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Along the same vein. . .

If I want to use a pie crust recipe for a 9" pan in a 6" pan (or two), I should calculate the surface area of said pans--does that sound right?

So, for example, if a 9" pan has a surface area of 92 inches squared, and a 6" pan has a surface area of 47 inches squared, then I should be able to get 2 6-inch crusts out of one 9-inch crust recipe, right?

Or is that completely wrong?

eta: all the pan conversion charts I've found are for volume only, including the tart pan (which holds 4 cups, by the way). But I'm not concerned about the volume since I'm only filling the tart with jam.


Edited by prasantrin (log)

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