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Bacon Salt


Reignking
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"We're on a quest to make everything taste like bacon"

:shock::shock::shock:

As much as I feel that making everything taste like bacon is a little one-dimensional and all, bacon is tasty.

It's also good that their product is, among other things, vegetarian. Being a former pseudo-vegetarian (a "pescatarian"), it always helps to have something that can substitute for things like bacon that aren't just crispy and delicious, but are sometimes used to flavor food that could be otherwise vegetarian-friendly. Some things just need that certain je ne sais quoi flavor-wise that animal flesh/fat provides, so if this stuff tastes as good as it claims to be, that's great... as long as you aren't one of those people who became vegetarian because the flavor of meat or meat substitutes makes you nauseous. Then I think this stuff won't help. :raz:

Mmmmm, bacon... I think I'm going to have to eat some bacon now...

"I know it's the bugs, that's what cheese is. Gone off milk with bugs and mould - that's why it tastes so good. Cows and bugs together have a good deal going down."

- Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry), Chef!

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Probably nothing more than taking regular salt and smoking it in different fashions.

Hickory or Hickory and maple... Lots of combinations are possible. Simply lay a tray of salt in your smoker.

Think I heard of this being made in Europe a couple of years ago. They called it smoked salt.

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No, it isn't like that -- I have smoked salt, which I use on meats.

This is a finer grain, like table salt, and undoubtedly is flavored artificially (I need the check the label).

I received the shipment a few days ago, but didn't get to try it until now. The first smell instantly reminded me of Bacos (which, in retrospect, I shouldn't have been surprised by). It went great with asparagus and a bit of butter, and on my eggs this morning.

It isn't too salty, either -- more bacony-flavor than salt.

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Hmm, I am wondering about whirling around some crisp crumbled bacon and some salt in the food processor to see what I get. The same experiment could be tried with Bacos.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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The stuff actually tastes pretty good. After reading the original post I ordered a a 3 pack to try. I've tried it on baked potatoes and green beans and it tasted very good on both. There isn't a whole lot of difference between the three flavors IMHO except for the slight taste of pepper. It doesn't have an artificial flavor or smell like Bacos do which is a surprise considering they are kosher! While not good for everything I can see some dishes that I'll be using it for.

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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I got some. I used it in bean soup - made with Rancho Gordo's heirloom beans.

Perfect flavor and vegetarian for my friends.

(I usually "flavor" beans with ham hocks or ham trimmings).

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 1 month later...

To those of you who've purchased this product, after a month or so with the Bacon Salt, is it still a good purchase? Any caveats? MSRadell said there wasn't much discernable difference in flavor between the different flavors. Does that still hold true?

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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An article in this morning's Seattle Times food section says it's sold at QFC here. It wasn't at my 24th Ave NW QFC, but that's closing soon (to make room for yet another huge condo building) and I guess they're not getting any new products there. So tomorrow I'll try the one on 85th.

Mmmmmbacon!

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To those of you who've purchased this product, after a month or so with the Bacon Salt, is it still a good purchase? Any caveats? MSRadell said there wasn't much discernable difference in flavor between the different flavors. Does that still hold true?

I wouldn't say there is a remarkable difference (I haven't tried hickory yet). I had some on my salad today.

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To those of you who've purchased this product, after a month or so with the Bacon Salt, is it still a good purchase? Any caveats? MSRadell said there wasn't much discernable difference in flavor between the different flavors. Does that still hold true?

I'm still glad I purchased it. I still feel there isn't a whole lot of difference between the three flavors so after I use the three pack I think I'll just buy the hickory flavored since I'd rather add my own pepper as I deem appropriate. I've found several other uses for it but still think it only has limited application in day to day cooking.

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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