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Non-dairy quiches


Lior
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I know there are some who are anti-non-dairy-creamer, but it works well in quiche. Just sub the milk/cream for Rich's or Mishpacha, or whatever you can get there.

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my friend does it with soy or almond milk/cheese all the time the flavor is fine but the cheese is kind of wierd consistancy wise ..but if you have no choice it is fine ...can you put meat it in or does it just have to be dairy free...I would use a greasy meat like a good sausage or bacon to help hide the lack of dairy..also add lots of veggies and call it good

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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okay, it has to be something that can be reheated as I am taking it with to a barbeque an half hours drive away. I guess an omelette would not be good reheated?

Dairy because the hosts keep kosher. No meat cause there are vegetarians involved. We are a complicted bunch! What are frittatas?! :blink: Soy milk could work, I am anti Rich's -sorry Pam!

Ideas are the hard part of cooking. I hate being ordinary.

I always go for unusual and surprising, simple is also good.

Thanks so for all the input in the meanwhile.

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Dairy because the hosts keep kosher. No meat cause there are vegetarians involved. We are a complicted bunch! What are frittatas?! :blink: Soy milk could work, I am anti Rich's -sorry Pam!

That's ok. I just find that when it comes to parve baking/cooking, it's often the best bet. If you can get potato milk, it also works well in baking (but it's hard to get).

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You could use soy milk or rice milk, but I would not eat it!

In a pinch, you can reconstitute dry non dairy creamer like Cremora or CoffeeMate to make a passable "light cream" for a quiche that is much better in its performance in a quiche than the soy or rice alternatives. This may also fit your "anti-Rich's" position.

I am not sure about Cremora, but CoffeeMate used to have its reconstitution formula on the label. Alternatively, you could google it. I know you dissolve the non-dairy powder in hot H2O and refrigerate, but do not remember the proportions.

Good luck!

Berta

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okay, it has to be something that can be reheated as I am taking it with to a barbeque an half hours drive away. I guess an omelette would not be good reheated?

Dairy because the hosts keep kosher. No meat cause there are vegetarians involved. We are a complicted bunch! What are frittatas?! :blink: Soy milk could work, I am anti Rich's -sorry Pam!

Ideas are the hard part of cooking. I hate being ordinary.

I always go for unusual and surprising, simple is also good.

Thanks so  for all the input in the meanwhile.

A frittata is like a crustless quiche wich is made in a baking dish and often served cooled. It's more of an unfolded omlett and very easy to make.

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Hmm, that sounds interesting -and served cool! What typically goes in a frittata? Is it Spanish? The hosts are ex Argentinians... Yes, they took some time getting used to vegetarians!!

The frittata is of Spanish origins. It is a wonderful peasant food which originally used eggs for the protien component of a dish, versus meat which wasn't around all the time or couldn't be afforded. It typically has cooked potatoes in it, as well as vegetables or even perhaps sausage. It's really whatever you have on hand type of meal.

Edited by monavano (log)
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I dont think a fritatta would reheat well, but its is delicious at room temperature. As is a Spanish tortilla (not the same as a Mexican one at all at all).

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Oh my !! I was planning on possibly using my soy milk, which apparently has sugar and vanilla added!!!

Now what is a Spanish tortilla?

And the carmelized red onions tart uses only the onions in a tart base?

I will take pictures when I am done, like I did for my previous request for ideas. I just love getting these inpirations and over morning coffee-perfect!

Thanks!! :biggrin:

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You know...it wouldn't be above an eGullet member to make their soy milk from scratch :wink: There's a great recipe in RecipeGullet - that way you can control what goes into it. Just be careful to follow the timeline on the recipe or you'll end up with THIS.

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A Spanish tortilla is essentially a potato and onion fritatta.

If non-dairy is the key, and eggs are ok, you might be able to make a tart by baking a vegetable custard into a partially prebaked shell. Think of pumpkin pie filling:

pureed low water vegetable, eggs and liquid. You'd need some creativity in that part - soy or stock or .. (pumpkin pie uses condensed milk often).

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Just to clarify, "frittata" is the Italian word for what the Spanish call "tortilla".

Frittate (plural) or tortillas (right?) are often served room temperature as KA says (or "cooled" as originally stated as opposed to "cool").

The classic Spanish tortilla is made w very thinly sliced potates and lots of olive oil. It is delicious and heavily documented on eGullet. Cf. the thread on José Andres' cookbook, Tapas, where a playful :wink: variation on the classic dish substitutes thick potato chips for fresh, raw potatoes.

You should feel free to use any ingredient that sounds good to you to make a f----- or a t-----.

I have actually reheated wedges of tortilla that were leftover just until they were slightly warm, then tucked them into thin, crusty rolls w a sofrito. Wonderful!

However, f's & t's really are best on the day they're made.

KA/Michelle said something else up-thread about vegetable tarts that might be better if you need to make this a day ahead. Deborah Madison's first cookbook, Greens has a couple of tarts using leeks or winter squash with eggs that bind. There might be milk or cream, but little. Less than a true custard filling. I am not a fan of substitute ingredients when it comes to dealing w allergies or veganism's taboos. Better to make a good dish that doesn't call for forbidden ingredients. But if you're okay w soy cheese, I suppose, that could add flavor.

This, however, is not at all like a quiche, but a great option: Winter Squash Galette. The cheese adds flavor, but could be omitted w minimal consequence.

(Revised to accommodate posts I overlooked.)

Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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