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BradenP

Butter: what to serve and drink with it

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Host's Note I've saved the following posts on the topic of butter tasting since they offered some advice on what to serve and drink with butter. As they say, "we'll now join a program in progress."

.... butter be French in origin and salted.

Not sure what accompaniments we should bring to the table, I was thinking baguette, but I will wait and consult Ptipois.


Edited by John Talbott (log)

"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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Why salted only? There are many unsalted French butters, and most of the butter consumed in France is unsalted.

Or you should have two different tastings, one for salted butter and another one for unsalted.

Baguette is by far the best choice.


Edited by Ptipois (log)

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Ooooh, this is why I wish I was living in Paris right now!

What will you be drinking with this? What would go with baguette et beurre?

I would humbly suggest a minerally Blanc de Blancs Champagne, its crisp acidity will cut through the fat of the butter, and the bubbles will scrub the palate clean.

And in the end, Champagne goes with everything. :wub:

Cheers! :cool:

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You're on to something there...

But good champagne might even make us excuse mediocre butter!

Come'on, you gotta taste anything in its natural surround, which for me (I'm outa town then) would be red wine and bread. Respectfully, who eats the butter on the table with bubbly?

I'll miss you guys because I would love to bring some Quatrehomme, which I just scooped into. Yum.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I'm afraid drinking any wine would conceal the delicate taste of butter. Baguette goes best with it, which is why I was suggesting it.

Unfortunately my supplies of Saint-Coal butter will be exctinct by November 1.

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I was thinking we would do salted for this one as it would be hard to compare the subtle differences of the butters if we did both. Look forward to another tasting for unsalted, which I use a lot more often. I'm glad the timing worked out TarteTatin, I would love to see some Amish butter or Vermont butter, or both if you have the room.


"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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You're on to something there...

But good champagne might even make us excuse mediocre butter!

Come'on, you gotta taste anything in its natural surround, which for me (I'm outa town then) would be red wine and bread. Respectfully, who eats the butter on the table with bubbly?

I'll miss you guys because I would love to bring some Quatrehomme, which I just scooped into. Yum.

True, but a nice fruity Beaujolais might go with it nonetheless if you aren't keen on the bubbly.

Wish I could be there!

Cheers! :cool:

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This is a fantastic idea. I look forward to coming, and hopefully, with a newly found delicious salted butter!

Great idea to restrict this to salted only ... not necessarily because salted is better; but, because it's much harder to compare salted to unsalted.

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This is a fantastic idea.  I look forward to coming, and hopefully, with a newly found delicious salted butter! 

Great idea to restrict this to salted only ... not necessarily because salted is better; but, because it's much harder to compare salted to unsalted.

Hi everyone as a UK based guy who likes butter especially salted, I have just heard that salt is added to inferior butters ti improve the taste.

I aslo have to find the butter thread as I have loads of questiuons.

Stef

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This sounds like a great event... And you've picked a great day since it's a holiday, BUT, no one has mentioned where the baguettes are going to be sourced from??? Surely there must be some consensus as to which boulangerie will be supplying the baguettes! I know I have my favorite baguette hot spots :biggrin:


"Compared to me... you're as helpless as a worm fighting an eagle"

BackwardsHat.com

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This is a fantastic idea.  I look forward to coming, and hopefully, with a newly found delicious salted butter! 

Great idea to restrict this to salted only ... not necessarily because salted is better; but, because it's much harder to compare salted to unsalted.

Hi everyone as a UK based guy who likes butter especially salted, I have just heard that salt is added to inferior butters ti improve the taste.

I aslo have to find the butter thread as I have loads of questiuons.

Stef

Salt used to be added to butter as a preservative before refrigeration was common. :raz: Now it is added (at much lower levels) because many people prefer the taste of salted butter. The UK has a campaign against salt and while overconsumption is a problem, don't over-react to all of the propaganda against this essential seasoning. :wink:

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