Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Parmigiano-Reggiano rinds


Recommended Posts

I was overcome with desire when I saw these at the store:

gallery_42214_4635_39813.jpg

Two bucks later I am looking at them without a clue as to what is next? Microplane them? Deep fry? Help . . .

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to post
Share on other sites
I was overcome with desire when I saw these at the store:

gallery_42214_4635_39813.jpg

Two bucks later I am looking at them without a clue as to what is next? Microplane them? Deep fry? Help . . .

How much is left on the interior? I think you can make broth with them or add them to soups, etc. Try this thread.

Edited by menon1971 (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, twenty minutes later and I have my answer!

Thanks gfron1, monavano, menon1971 and CaliPoutine. I had heard about the soup but was skeptical, now I'll give it a try. BTW the rind fragments are quite thin, maybe 5mm and very dense so I don't think I scored any of the "undisputed king of cheeses".

Calipoutine, I thought of you guys in Exeter the other day when someone was explaining to me their stew made from squirrels! He said he has never seen a white one, thank goodness.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter, I see you got the rinds from Pete's. I too started seeing them there several years ago, and at first could not resist buying them. But I always have a wedge of parm on hand, so I produce my on rinds. I used them for sauces, soups, etc. But, in the end, I found I had just way too many rinds, so I didn't buy any more.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Testing this theory...

Lexi being a bit more obedient than usual:

gallery_41282_4708_489.jpg

The blur you see is Lexi deciding that she likes the rind more than she likes posing for pictures:

gallery_41282_4708_48599.jpg

I will add, however, that not much chewing occurred, so rounding the edges might be a good idea.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can make a really nice flavoured oil,100g of rind to 250ml of light olive oil couple of sprigs pf thyme ,1 sprig of rosemary heat till bubbles are apearing and take of the heat, allow it to sit in kitchen while doing other things then strain at the end of the night and keep in the fridge.

Makes a great base for any salad involving parmesan or for dip for crunchy bread.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Testing this theory...

Lexi being a bit more obedient than usual:

gallery_41282_4708_489.jpg

The blur you see is Lexi deciding that she likes the rind more than she likes posing for pictures:

gallery_41282_4708_48599.jpg

I will add, however, that not much chewing occurred, so rounding the edges might be a good idea.

Lucky dogs!! I thought I treated mine, too!

Link to post
Share on other sites

One more vote for adding to soups. I keep my rinds in the freezer and with soup season coming up in the near future, I will be using them and probably run out before I want to.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

ok make a parm stock. do some onions, bay leaf. thyme, peppercorns maybe a little left over white wine, simmer for maybe an hour or 2, the key is to not let it boil. once it is done simmering pull it out and scrape the gooey inside of the ride that is parm, save that for another use. now you have a delicious parm stock that makes and amazing risotto or you can use it pasta dishes or for you sauce, basicaly sub it out for anything that you would add water, if you want parm flavor!

Link to post
Share on other sites

you can also grill the rinds, and they soften and melt.

Cheese stores also used to put them through electric grinders and sell as cheese.. which they are. Just harder!

Nothing is put on the rinds, the forms are soaked in a salt water bath.

they usually scrape them a little to clean off any dirt from aging.

Enjoy!

I throw them in my minestrone!

Link to post
Share on other sites
You can make a really nice flavoured oil,100g of rind to 250ml of light olive oil couple of sprigs pf thyme ,1 sprig of rosemary heat till bubbles are apearing and take of the heat, allow it to sit in kitchen while doing other things then strain at the end of the night and keep in the fridge.

  Makes a great base for any salad involving parmesan or for dip for crunchy bread.

This sounds really good. Like... enough to make me want to go buy a big hunk of parmesan for the rind so I can do it. I've been on a flavored-oils-on-crusty-bread-with-sliced-tomato kick lately.

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

Link to post
Share on other sites

The parm oil and parm stock sound like new and wonderful ideas to me, just in time for the fall and winter heat-up-the-kitchen cookery. Thanks!

With the parm oil, do you chop up the rind first, or throw it in whole? Does it matter?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand where these rinds are coming from. Why are they cutting them off in the first place? Do people not like to buy cheese with the rind attached? I don't like to buy a piece with rind on two sides because it's a pain to grate, but I'm happy to buy a piece with rind on one side because I know how great it is for soups. Can somebody please explain?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't understand where these rinds are coming from. Why are they cutting them off in the first place? Do people not like to buy cheese with the rind attached? I don't like to buy a piece with rind on two sides because it's a pain to grate, but I'm happy to buy a piece with rind on one side because I know how great it is for soups. Can somebody please explain?

Sure, many stores take the wheel of parmesan, cut the rind off, and pre-grate it for sale in a container or bag. Some people who don't know the true gem that the rind is think "this is expensive, so why pay for the weight of the rind since I'm not going to use it".

People who cook with the rinds look for them separately as they are usually priced much cheaper than the pieces of parmesan, rind or no rind.

Edited by monavano (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...