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njduchess

cheesecake-on-a-stick advice, please

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We are going to try cheesecake on a stick as a dessert. I've seen pictures of the type that they sell at State Fairs, which is basically a wedge of cheesecake on a stick dipped in chocolate. There is also the David Burke type of cheesecake lollipops, dipped in chocolate and other confections. I think we are going to have to compromise and do something in the middle in terms of size. I think that the wedge of cake would be just too big to dip with home-kitchen equipment.

Now here's the question: What kind of cheesecake would be the best to try for dipping. Do we need to make something firmer (maybe a little gelatin added)? Do you think we can freeze or almost freeze any type of cheesecake without spoiling the texture in order to get a neat dip?

Thanks for your help.

Marie


NJDuchess

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I'm not an expert but this is what I think. I would make the cheesecake pieces about the same size as a mini popsicle. I would use Cooks Illustrated recipe for baked cheesecake as it is quite dense, it freezes well and would dip easily. I just thought of something else. I use a chocolate cheesecake recipe from Epicurious that tastes like a fudgsicle when frozen and might be a good recipe to use as well.

Here's the link: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/4484


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Thanks for the suggestions. I think I'll try the Cooks Illustrated recipe for a dense and firm type. With chocolate dipping, I think I would prefer a non-chocolate cheesecake. I think I'll give the "pops" less than an hour in the freezer before dipping.

What I would really like to do is bake the cake in a sheet cake pan so I can get nice even squares. I wonder if it would bake properly in a non-round cake pan. Anyone know?

Thanks.

Marie


NJDuchess

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It won't care what shape pan you bake it in. :wink: Same temp, same test for doneness as the recipe calls for with the round pan, time may vary depending if the pan is bigger or smaller (because it will be thicker or thinner) but not because of the shape.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Thanks for the suggestions.  I think I'll try the Cooks Illustrated recipe for a dense and firm type.  With chocolate dipping, I think I would prefer a non-chocolate cheesecake.  I think I'll give the "pops" less than an hour in the freezer before dipping. 

What I would really like to do is bake the cake in a sheet cake pan so I can get nice even squares.  I wonder if it would bake properly in a non-round cake pan.  Anyone know?

Thanks.

Marie

As Tri2cook said, shape is not a problem. I recently made a bunch of individual cheesecakes in rings on a sheet pan. To keep it moist in the oven I put a cake pan of water on the bottom shelf when I turned my oven on to preheat and left it there till they were done. If you bake it at 275F and keep an eye on it you should be fine.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Thanks for your help. I'll let you know how it went. I'll even try to post pictures.

Marie


NJDuchess

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Having some leftover chocolate cheesecake batter, I decided to try cheesecake lollipops.

I baked off a half sheet, using a pan extender and foil instead of a crust; I refrigerated the baked cake for a little while (probably not nearly enough), then cut them up thinking I would dip squares and decided that round would be better. So I mashed them, shaping them into rounds and stuck the lollipop sticks in and they're in the walkin freezer overnight.

What are the chances that when I dip these in the morning the sticks will come out or off?

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