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FoodMuse

Where to recommend first time visitors to eat

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Hi,

This will be my first time in Paris. I guess I should see a few touristy sites, but mostly I'm interested in eating. I'm actually dieting now to lose 10lb, so when I gain 10-15 in France it won't be so distressing. :biggrin:

In late September I'll be staying in an apartment on Rue Plumet near Volontaires metro in the Pasteur area. If you know any great spots nearby please chime in.

Here are a few things I'd like some advice on. I'm working out my budget and want to eat most breakfasts and lunches on the cheap to spend more on dinners. I also expect I'll make a dinner or 2 in the apartment.

I haven't been able to find out what I can expect to pay for the classic picnic ingredients wine, bread, cheese, ham and fruit to take on picnics. Any thoughts? Are supermarkets cheaper than little shops? I'm also, obviously interested in quality.

Merci,

Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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Not being fully cognizant of Parisian Streets and metro stops, I must ask what arrondisement is that? You should have a lovely time in Paris. I have checked out your blog and it is most enjoyable. I have no doubt that you will get along quite well there. I would encourage you to find a few small shops or markets that you really like and frequent them. The restaurants will depend on where exactly you are and how much you wish to travel. The other obvious questions are what is your budget and what kinds of food are you particularly looking for? Do you speak any French? Even if just a little, that will be better than none.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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What joy! I would suggest that you shop locally in small shops. The price differential will be minimal and most apartment dwellers have more of a problem of buying too much than spending too much. In small shops you can dictate the size of the portion you buy: cheese, butter, charcuterie, etc. Remember your mother, "Waste not, want not."

I think that perhaps you mean rue Blumet. If so, you will be staying in the 15th, I believe. One pleasant dinner spot in your area is L'Ami Marcel, 33, rue Georges-Pitard, 01.48.56.62.06, located just off rue Vouille.

Don't be afraid to use both bus and the more obvious metro to explore outside your neighborhood. We love the buses, and your area is well served by both the 39 and 95, both north-south workhorses. Our system is to find the address we want to visit, then plot the transportation. Often we go by bus, then return by metro in those cases when the bus stops running, usually around 9:30.

Enjoy.


eGullet member #80.

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Bonjour docsconz,

The apartment is in the fifteenth arrondissement. My French is very rudimentary (merci, bonjour, etc) but I am working on it. This trip is very spur of the moment, so I am trying to practice some French every day with a friend who speaks fairly good French. I’ve already been told my French sounds like I’m from Alabama (I’m a Bostonian) and they didn’t mean this in a good way. Oh, well.

Thanks for watching my video blog, I’m having a good time with it!

I think I’d like to stay in Paris most of the trip, and I’ll go anywhere on the Metro. I live in NY so public transportation is …… oh, wait let me use a French phrase here……. de riguer. I would like to take a train out to a pretty town where I don’t have to rent a car and maybe stay overnight and drink some great wine.

I’m still working out the food budget, I’ll post it when I have my math figured out.

Margaret: Thank you for responding. The person I’m swapping apartments with sent me an email with the address. It is definitely Rue Plumet and I’ve seen it on a map. It’s between Rue des Volontaires and Rue Bargue just south of the Institut Pasteur. I was just talking with someone today about wanting to use the bus as a way of getting a feel for the city. I’ll just get off when something looks interesting. I can’t wait to picnic.

Great to know I can buy only what I think I will use. I would rather frequent smaller mom and pop stores. I’ve put L'Ami Marcel on my to do list.

Can I admit here I’m a little nervous French people will be annoyed with my attempts at speaking French?

Thanks,

Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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Hi Grace,

I used to live right near where you’re going to be staying and it’s a great location! You’ll be right there by the 6 and 12 lines and you’ll be able to get just about anywhere in the city quickly.

It’s been a couple of years now ( ! ) but here are some suggestions from my list of favorites. They are all moderate to inexpensive with the last two the least expensive of the lot. Just depends on the kind of place for which you are looking. All of these are not too far from Montparnasse. Enjoy!

1. C'est Mon Plaisir Small, bright, sunny feel, updated cuisine that is not too heavy and not too expensive, and relatively quiet but by no means dead when full. Staff is comfortable with English-speakers -- the Brits somehow got this one on their map, and neighborhood folks love it too. They make a grilled shrimp dish with Colombo d'Epinards that was the best spinich dish I've ever eaten. Reservations recommended.

8 rue Falguière 75015

Metro: Falguiere

Tel. 01 42 73 07 02

2. Les Dix Vins Excellent wines & plats. Run by two former software engineers who decided to go to culinary school. More interesting traditional menu than most. Quite good. Reservations recommended.

57 rue Falguière, 75015 Paris

Tel: 01 43 20 91 77. Metro: Pasteur

Call to check their hours; we think it was not open on Saturdays or Sundays.

3. Le Florimond Older and slightly more upscale, excellent fish and, on our one occasion there, a great example of proper French wait service; may not be the most “fun” place for a 24 year old.

19, Avenue de La Motte-Picquet 75007

Metro: Le Motte-Picquet Grenelle

Tel. 01 45 55 40 38

4. Baribal Very traditional, not too dark, very lively and can be rather smoky-- no barrier for nonsmoking section -- neighborhood place with the best Pommes Sarladaise (sliced potatoes fried crisp in duck fat with mushrooms) we had anywhere outside of a private kitchen in Dordogne. Wait staff is overworked, so be patient and, if necessary, politely assertive.

186, Rue Vaugirard 75015

Metro: Volontaires or Pasteur

Tel. : +(33) 1 47 34 15 32

5. Le Karibou Excellent African food; very spicy for France; very friendly staff and chef, casual. Must try: Poulet Fume Yassa.

32 boulevard Vaugirard (actually it's in Galerie Vaugirard, just off Blvd. Vaugirard)

75015 Paris 15

Tél : 01 43 20 19 49

Some local sights:

Boulevard de Vaugirard & Pasteur for view of Eiffel

Rue Blomet Wonderful little children’s park called Sq. Blomet (between r. Volontaires and r. Cambronne) with a surprise: Look for Lunar Bird by the sculptor Joan Miro – one of only three in the world.

Oh I’m getting so homesick for Paris!

Bon chance!


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I lived not far from where you'll be staying in the 15th when I studied in Paris thirteen years ago. It's a little far south from where all the action is but easily within walking distance of my favorite places. (Nice neighborhood, but pretty residential.) Taking buses is the way to go - it's essentially how I learned the city, and helps to piece together where things are. Tons of buses (I think the 90s?) run through Montparnasse which is right near you.

How long will you be there?

I was just in paris for a couple of days and I think that it's fairly comparable to what you'd expect to spend in New York on food, maybe a little more since the exchange rate sucks. There are random things that will seem expensive to you even as a NYer, like a cup of coffee at a cafe, but it's been that way for as long as I can remember. Besides, with that cup of coffee comes the right to sit for as long as you'd like, and the people watching is usually priceless . . .

There are tons of things I could tell you about staying in Paris - you'll discover all of your own favorite neighborhoods, markets, shopkeepers, cafes, restaurants - that's the fun of being there. I would encourage you to speak as much French as you can, even if you could be speaking english - you'll be amazed at how much better your french will get after a short time. I've lived in paris and been there dozens of times and just like NY (and everywhere), there are people who can be rude, but on the whole I have found parisians to be extremely appreciative and supportive of my efforts to speak their language. A little effort goes a very long way (like simply greeting shopkeepers with a "bonjour" when you enter). Drinking a lot of wine also helps.

There's a pretty recent thread here somewhere about budget eating in paris, with some good recommendations on it. Picnics in the Jardin du Luxembourg are blissful. I visited L'As du Fallafel again this trip, and it was as great as ever!

Feel free to pm me if I can help in any other way. You're going to love it.

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Lucky you! The first trip to Paris is a magical time & you will be there at the best time of the year.

Try to speak as much French as you can. It will be appreciated and will enhance your experience.

Shop in the little neighborhood stores & the street markets, its much more fun. Be a pointer. (je voudrais ca!) As you point at what you want. You'll learn lots of vocabulary that way. Use lots of 'si vous plait's & merci's & lots of bonne journees. The French are very polite.

Think about lunches. If you need to keep on your budget lunches are a great way to do it. Great meals at fixed prices. Dinners are fine, but tend to be more expensive. Save money on breakfast by getting your own croissants & coffee.

You'll have a great time.

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I haven't been able to find out what I can expect to pay for the classic picnic ingredients wine, bread, cheese, ham and fruit to take on picnics. Any thoughts? Are supermarkets cheaper than little shops? I'm also, obviously interested in quality.

For picnic stuff you will not be that far from Sevres-Babylone and Bon Marche's Grande Epicerie which while not cheap is certainly comprehensive.
I'm working out my budget and want to eat most breakfasts and lunches on the cheap to spend more on dinners. I also expect I'll make a dinner or 2 in the apartment.
I'd reverse your strategy: eat lunch at a resto (where it can be up to 1/2 the cost of dinner) and supper at home. That way you can "walk off" your calories.
Rue Plumet near Volontaires metro in the Pasteur area. If you know any great spots nearby please chime in.
In addition to Dix Vins, you're not far from Le Troquet, quite reasonable and Thierry Burlot, less reasonable but terrific.

Le Troquet

21 Rue Francois Bonvin, 15th (Metro: Volontaires)

T; 01.45.66.89.00

Closed Sunday and Monday

Menus: 23 € lunch, 30 € dinner, 37 €. A la carte 45-55 €.

Thierry Burlot

8 Rue Nicolas Charlet, 15th (Metro: Pasteur)

T: 01.42.19.08.59

Closed Saturday lunch and Sunday.

Formula 26 €, menu-carte 32 €, degustation menu 52 €.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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having your coffee at the bar ,as opposed to a table, will save you some money. not as conducive to people watching and lingering but, certainly cheaper.

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Taking note of all these comments. Wonderful.

Is there anything like hopstop.com(for NY) in Paris, where you type in your starting destination and ending and you receive details for how to get there via bus and metro. Mappy.com seems to only give driving and walking directions.

Good idea to eat at more expensive restos for lunch!

If prices in Paris are similar to New York then does this picnic budget for two make sense?

Bread $5 = 3.9 euro

Ham/or other meat $3 = 2.3 euro

Cheese $3 = 2.3 euro

Wine $10 = 7.8 euro

Fruit/vegetable $2 = 1.6 euro

Thanks!


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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Is there anything like hopstop.com(for NY) in Paris, where you type in your starting destination and ending and you receive details for how to get there via bus and metro. Mappy.com seems to only give driving and walking directions.

Thanks!

Sure, you need ratp.fr


Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Unless you're getting specialty bread and better wine that a picnic strictly demands, you might even be able to do a little better than that.

I also like to go to the traiteurs when picnicing, to stock up on slightly more elaborate fare. Keep your eyes open for them , some of them serve excellent prepared food -- they remind me of those delis in NYC where everyone picks up sushi and salad on the way home from work (except that they have, say eggs in aspic rather than spring rolls).

Don't forget pastries and pate! Just because you're in Paris is no reason not to have a well-balanced diet. :wink:


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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If you walk up Pasteur, about one long block, take a left onto Lecourbe. About a block or so on your left you’ll find a traiteur (deli) with an excellent selection.

The details are becoming a bit fuzzy after 2 years… sorry.

You really do need to do the picnic thing in the Jardin du Luxembourg. Get a half-bottle of wine and some good bread (we LOVED the bannettes at our neighborhood boulangerie on r. Falguière – like a baguette but with pointy ends and a little fatter in the middle), some good cheese, etc. etc.

To get to “our neighborhood boulangerie” follow Pasteur south of r. de Vaugirard a couple of blocks and turn left onto r. Falguière. It’ll be just right there on the right.

ETA: By the way, there’s a much flashier boulangerie/patisserie on Pasteur just south of Falguière a block or so on the left. The staff is pretty rude and the products are…well, I don’t like to use language like that on a public board. Enough said.


Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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salut, grace!

you will indeed have a wonderful time in paris. i am jalouse! please excuse me if you already know this, but one of the best ways to enhance your trip is to remember to say "Bonjour, monsieur" or "Bonjour, madame" any and everywhere you go and then "Merci, au revoir" when you leave a place. makes a huge difference in how you are perceived and treated by the french.

also, try to remember not to touch the fruit at the marchés, beautiful though it may be. i always forget the first few times. just say hello, point, and ask. they will try to give you the best, not the worst, pieces, for the most part.

it's great that you're losing weight before going to paris, but think of it more as a compensation for when you get back than for when you're over there. the last time i was there (for 4 days/3 nights), i ate anything and everything i wanted. when i got back, i found i had lost 3 pounds! it was only when i got back to the us and continued to eat in a similar fashion that i gained back that weight (and then some!). if you must, you can eat a balanced diet in paris, too. salads and veggies are often prepared just deliciously as the pastries, pork and pâté.

here are just a few of my favorite spots to add to the legions of recs you have/will receive. all are pretty reasonably priced:

octave: ice cream from a toulouse ice cream maker. i think it is better than the much more famous berthillon. my favorite flavor is reglisse, a licorice-y flavor.

138 rue Mouffetard, 5e, M° Censier Daubenton, tel: 01 45 35 20 56

pierre hermé: for macarons. now, there are many other sources, and you can visit the macaron thread to see impassioned (and informative) debate about who has the best. i like the pierre herme ones for the exotic flavors, especially olive oil and saffron.

185, rue de vaugirard, 15th (your hood!) tel: 01 47 83 89 96

72, rue bonaparte, 6th tel: 01 43 54 47 77

au gamin de paris: nothing fancy, but vibrant atmosphere, in a cozy room in one of my favorite neighborhoods, the marais. here you can eat soup to nuts with wine for under €60. the menu is typical bistro, including steaks prepared in several ways (au poîvre, roquefort, etc.) sweetbreads, and rich, not to be missed versions of tarte tatin and chocolate cake. also, i ate here alone two nights in a row and was welcomed and treated graciously both times. although it's sometimes charactarized as touristy, i felt it had a very middle class parisian vibe when i visited a couple of years ago.

jadis et gourmande: for chocolate covered orange peels and other chocolate-mixed-with-stuff treats.

49 bis av Franklin D. Roosevelt, 8e, tel: 01 42 25 06 04

88 blvd de Port Royal, 5e, tel: 01 43 26 17 75

27 rue Boissy d'Anglais, 8e, tel: 01 42 65 23 23

39, rue des Archives, 4e, tel: 01 48 04 08 03

la maison du chocolat: i've tried many other chocolatiers in the city and always come back to la maison for its chocolats. no, the flavors aren't as exciting as some of the others' but you cannot beat linxe's gift for creating some of the most beautifully textured ganache in the world.

la maison du chocolat locations

la grande épicerie de paris: as john talbott mentioned earilier. not cheap, but even just looking (especially on one of your first days in paris) is an event in itself. the vareity and beauty is overwhelming. once you get over that, you can try to shop. it's great for gifts and for yourself. for myself i always pick up a few boxes of bouillon cubes (they are flavored diffrerently 'round the world and are an inexpensive way to enhance your kitchen when you get back home) and canned cassoulet, which can also be doctored up when you return. while in paris, select a couple of pieces of their fruit and cheese. the selection and quality is incredible. so are the prices, though. that's why i said just a couple of pieces. go to your local marche for more everyday stuff.

38, rue de sevres, 7e

marie-anne cantin cheese: ok, this not cheap, but if you need to bring back some cheese, get it here and have them pack it in the smell-proof packaging. (other eGulleters, please pitch in with any better value/comparable quality shops you might know of.). the selection at this lovely shop is incredible and the freshness of the cheeses impeccable.

12, rue du Champ de Mars, 7e, www.cantin.fr

la dernière goutte: there are tons of great wine shops in paris. but i like this one for its reasonably-priced boutique wines that are hand selected by owner juan sanchez. i regret not bringing home a set of wine glasses etched with the store's name from my last trip.

6, rue de Bourbon le Chateau, 6e, tel : 01 43 29 11 62

cremerie caves miard: another niche-y wine shop specializing in biodynamic wines from france. there is also a cafe with sandwiches and the like right there in the middle of the floor. among the last bottles i bought here was a loire valley sparkler that was capped with a beer cap! it was outrageous and delicious! and cheap.

9, rue des Quatre-Vents, 6e, tel: 01 43 54 99 30

le confiturier: a little mom and pop neighborhood resto near the hôtel lutetia, specializing in tartines, salads, and dessert crumbles. i ate here alone for lunch, was treated in a most friendly manner by the proprietess, and all i can say is don't miss the rhubarb crumble -- or any crumble; they probably change with the seasons -- served with a little pot of crème anglaise, if it is available.

20, rue du cherche-midi, 6e, tel: 01 45 49 33 64

i could go on, but i don't want to bombard you. i do want to come back with the name of a great people-watching café near pont louis-phillipe , but i have to figure out the name. also, i always check out chocolate & zucchini for parisian recommendations. always reliable for thoughtfully written, spot on recommendations and lovely writing about paris as a food town.


Edited by bethala (log)

can't believe it's not butter? i can.

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...

also, try to remember not to touch the fruit at the marchés, beautiful though it may be.  i always forget the first few times.  just say hello, point, and ask.  they will try to give you the best, not the worst, pieces, for the most part.

You may hear an unexpected question when purchasing fruit: "Pour quand?" They are asking "for when" you'd like to eat the fruit so you can get the best degree of ripeness. Very cool.

it's great that you're losing weight before going to paris, but think of it more as a compensation for when you get back than for when you're over there.  the last time i was there (for 4 days/3 nights), i ate anything and everything i wanted.  when i got back, i found i had lost 3 pounds! 

Yes, even riding the metro and buses you'll still do a lot of walking. Eat sensibly but don't worry too much about the calories.

here are just a few of my favorite spots to add to the legions of recs you have/will receive.  all are pretty reasonably priced:

octave: ice cream from a toulouse ice cream maker.  i think it is better than the much more famous berthillon.  my favorite flavor is reglisse, a licorice-y flavor.

138 rue Mouffetard, 5e, M° Censier Daubenton, tel: 01 45 35 20 56

Yes, Berthillon is really overrated in my opinion. I don't know of Octave but would rather try that than going to B.

Also, r. Mouffetard is SO lively and fun!

pierre hermé: for macarons.  now, there are many other sources, and you can visit the macaron thread to see impassioned (and informative) debate about who has the best.  i like the pierre herme ones for the exotic flavors, especially olive oil and saffron.

185, rue de vaugirard, 15th (your hood!) tel: 01 47 83 89 96

72, rue bonaparte, 6th tel: 01 43 54 47 77

Near Luxembourg, too. Try the Isphan which is Raspberry, Rose, Litchi. And ogle the 90Euro (big) slice of cake in the display.

...

la maison du chocolat:  i've tried many other chocolatiers in the city and always come back to la maison for its chocolats.  no, the flavors aren't as exciting as some of the others' but you cannot beat linxe's gift for creating some of the most beautifully textured ganache in the world.

la maison du chocolat locations

Quite right! Also, if you're into chocolate, check out David Lebovitz for more Paris chocolate suggestions.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I hope I'm not being gratuitous, but as a first-time visitor you may want to look at our Pinned thread above on Eating, Shopping and Staying in France. It has categories that may be helpful to you and while it looks like it hasn't been added to since February it is constantly being updated as new threads come on line.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Grace,

You’re going to have such a great time!

Sound advice upthread. Our own strategy when we travel is to splurge for one meal (usually dinner), and eat cheaply the other meals. We stayed in the 8th, and had our breakfasts (coffee and a croissant) in a local cafe. We were thus able to save room for the chocolates, madelines, and other pastries we encountered during our meanderings through the city.

My husband, who speaks much better French than I do, did most of the talking. My French is rudimentary at best, and not only that, I got flustered trying to remember which language to use (no Karen, you're in France--it's not buon goirno!). But when I did dare open my mouth, the Parisians were friendly and understanding, and not at all rude.

I can’t find my food notes from my recent trip in May, but my favorite restaurant was Le Charlain (at 23 rue Clauzel, in the 9th). Wonderful foie gras, sweetbreads, and rather reasonably priced. Also on the cheap is Vietnamese food. We had some great pho at Restaurant Tan Lido, (86, Av. d’Ivry, in the 13th).

On la maison du chocolat – while I agree that it has great chocolate, there’s one in NY, so I didn't think it to be as "unique" as other shops we've encountered.


Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Well, I don't have much to add after all this great advice offered here. no doubt that you will have a great time though.

Actually, one bit of advice to you would be to buy and cook some Bresse chickens. They are outstanding (and expensive!) and essentially unique to France. They may make you rethink chicken!


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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We haven't been to Paris for a while, so our restaurant & shopping experiences may not be up to date, but one additional recommendation I have is to get yourself a Carte Orange for public transportation. You can buy it at Metro stations -- although our French was rudimentary, other riders helped us figure out the process.

Both the Metro and the bus system are wonderful in Paris. If you can read a simple line map (know the terminus for the direction in which you want to travel, then count the number of stops between where you got on and where you want to get off), it's near-impossible to get lost, and buses often go through all sorts of interesting neighborhoods.

I quite agree with the recommendation to frequent small neighborhood shops, and always greet the proprietor with a "Bonjour madame/monsieur" upon entering.


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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When I read not to touch the fruit (excellent tip) I thought, “Well then, how the heck do I know what’s ripe”. Now having John DePaula’s comment it all makes sense.

How do I respond politely to “Pour quand?” Would en ce moment work? Thank god for my French/English dictionary.

I will definitely be picnicking in Jardin du Luxembourg. Every board that talks about a picnic mentions it.

I am getting so excited about this trip.

ratp.fr is truly awesome.

It's wonderful to have places to eat in the neighborhood I'll be staying in. Thanks for those recommendations.

Any ideas for lovely spots along the river or canal for afternoon people watching and of course good eats?

Monsieur Talbot thanks for pointing out the thread, I actually hadn't looked at them yet. They are a great resource.

Bresse chicken! Oh that is so on the list. I'm also curious if the eggs will taste any different.

-G


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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When I read not to touch the fruit (excellent tip) I thought, “Well then, how the heck do I know what’s ripe”.  Now having John DePaula’s comment it all makes sense.

How do I respond politely to “Pour quand?”  Would en ce moment work? Thank god for my French/English dictionary.

That would probably be fine... or try "aujourd'oui"

I'm so excited for you! Have a wonderfuil trip! :biggrin:


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Try the Canal St Martin for people watching. It is off the tourist path for the most part and fun to sit and watch life going by.

I think John's advice of eating lunch out and dinner in is great. You will be able to get reservations at nicer places for a sweeter price. It is one of the few times you may be able to snag a table at Le Comptoir.

It is very hard to gain weight in Paris. I usually don't even take the bus. I arm myself with a map and just walk. Even if you get lost, there is never a metro very far away.

Have a wonderful time, Paris is the most wonderful city in the world.


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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This is kind of random but what the hell - raisab mentioned arming herself with a map and just walking - if you're staying more than a week I would invest in a good plan. Michelin makes these awesome small map books that you can get in any bookstore. They're so convenient, they have every street in Paris on them, you wont be the lost tourist folding and refolding your map, even the Parisians use them . . . .

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It's going gradually out of date (though you can get it at the remaindered price on Amazon, so it's likely still worth the investment), but a great supplement to RaisaB's aimless wandering strategy -- which I heartily endorse -- is Patricia Well's "Food Lovers Guide to Paris." Its great advantage, to me, was its arrangement by arrondissment, so if you found yourself feeling a little peckish in the 9th, you could pick put anything from ice cream parlors to fine dining restaurants to satisfy your cravings. Plus, it's pretty complete, including eating establishments at all levels, specialty shops (pastry shops, cheesemongers etc.), cookbook stores and kitchen supply shops. Well worth a look.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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I'll be in Paris for 9 days. Hooray. It was even fun writing that. I've started planning by just having a simple itinerary of things I want to see grouped together by location.

The day I go to the Louvre, I'll have a list of other sites nearby and places to eat.

I'm sure that I won't do half the things on the list, but at least I'll have options.

I really like The Paris Mapguide by M. Middleditch. It's very conventiently sized and has maps by arrondissements.

OK, you are the 5th person to reccomend I pick up Patricia Well's "Food Lovers Guide to Paris. I'll get it tommorow. :biggrin:

I'd also like to hit a nightclub for at least one night, but I keep reading what misery it is to find a cab after 1pm. Anyone know where I can find a map that shows the routes of the night Autobus du nuit and Noctambus?

How is the quality of bread in the city? Do I really need to have a list of great boulangeries to eat the good stuff?

Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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