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Norman Love at the French Pastry School


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Thanks David and Ruth for answering those questions!

One more question, of the chocolate decorations you learned, how would you rank them in order of difficulty? That is, which ones should I (or somebody like me) learn first?

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Thanks David and Ruth for answering those questions!

One more question, of the chocolate decorations you learned, how would you rank them in order of difficulty?  That is, which ones should I (or somebody like me) learn first?

I wouldn't put any of these at a high level of difficulty.

The easiest decorations would be those spread on acetate. You can spread chocolate on an acetate ribbon, let it start to set, then run a knife through it to make long triangles, drop it in a curved mold and let it set. Then you get those curly pieces you see on top of several of the cakes.

If you run a pastry comb through the chocolate instead, you get the spirals or the teardrops. They are a little tricky to peel and seperate without breaking. If you want individual teardrops you have to be carefull to line them up perfectly

With only a tiny bit more effort you can cut the ribbon to the exact inside diameter of a pastry ring and produce the large circles. Just remember to pipe a line of chocolate along the join so you don't get a handful of seperate rings when you remove the ribbon.

You can make some really nice pieces based on nothing but spreading chocolate on a two dimensional surface and placing it in a curved mold.

Cigarettes are the probably the most difficult because you have to judge the degree of setting and work quickly once you find the sweet spot.

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David,

Any idea what brand name the raplette was? I'm in the market for one, and having trouble finding a decent one.

Luis

Sorry, I didn't catch the brand name. You might call the French Pastry School or send them an email and ask.

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luis, they also make a raplette specifically for chocolate work. i can't remember where i've seen it, but rather than a three sided one (like the one pictured which is for cake batter), it is actually a stainless steel box which you pour your temepered chocolate into. then you can run the box over the rubber stencils (for the bottoms of piped bonbons). don't know if that is more your speed, since you mostly do chocolate stuff. if i can find it, i'll link to it.

edited to add: regardless of which one you want, they tend to be a bit pricey...close to $200 i'm thinking.

Edited by alanamoana (log)
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luis, they also make a raplette specifically for chocolate work.  i can't remember where i've seen it, but rather than a three sided one (like the one pictured which is for cake batter), it is actually a stainless steel box which you pour your temepered chocolate into.  then you can run the box over the rubber stencils (for the bottoms of piped bonbons).  don't know if that is more your speed, since you mostly do chocolate stuff.  if i can find it, i'll link to it.

edited to add: regardless of which one you want, they tend to be a bit pricey...close to $200 i'm thinking.

Pastry Chef has one that looks good for $90. If you purchase it, please give review.

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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luis, they also make a raplette specifically for chocolate work.  i can't remember where i've seen it, but rather than a three sided one (like the one pictured which is for cake batter), it is actually a stainless steel box which you pour your temepered chocolate into.  then you can run the box over the rubber stencils (for the bottoms of piped bonbons).  don't know if that is more your speed, since you mostly do chocolate stuff.  if i can find it, i'll link to it.

edited to add: regardless of which one you want, they tend to be a bit pricey...close to $200 i'm thinking.

Alana,

The only one I've ever seen is the 3 sided one. I had no idea they had a 4 sided one. Yes, please, I would love to see the link. The one I saw at JBprince was I believe either $140 or $150, but didn't seem well built to me.

Luis

Edited by sote23 (log)
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luis, they also make a raplette specifically for chocolate work.  i can't remember where i've seen it, but rather than a three sided one (like the one pictured which is for cake batter), it is actually a stainless steel box which you pour your temepered chocolate into.  then you can run the box over the rubber stencils (for the bottoms of piped bonbons).  don't know if that is more your speed, since you mostly do chocolate stuff.  if i can find it, i'll link to it.

edited to add: regardless of which one you want, they tend to be a bit pricey...close to $200 i'm thinking.

Pastry Chef has one that looks good for $90. If you purchase it, please give review.

Hi Mark,

Thanks for the link, that is a very good deal actually. they are usually much more than that. It says it's made in Italy, so it's either a Pavoni or Martaletto, would be my guess.

Luis

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David,

Any idea what brand name the raplette was? I'm in the market for one, and having trouble finding a decent one.

Luis

Sorry, I didn't catch the brand name. You might call the French Pastry School or send them an email and ask.

Thanks David, I didn't even think of that.

Luis

Luis,

If you were in FLA at Schott's class you could ask him what he uses! Sorry you couldn't make it. I'll ask him for you tomorrow if you like.

Cheri

Edited by cheripie (log)

www.cheri-pie.com

Life is too short. Eat good chocolate.

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The difference in price (about 90-110 vs. 200-250) is usually whether its fixed or not, or whether it has the comb feature.

If you always want to slide a specific height, like always just for biscuit or for chocolate, a fixed raplette is fine (or even make your own our of thin sheet metal). But the usefulness of adjusting the height is wonderful. The more expensive ones have a set of thumbscrews for attaching a set of fluted combs (curved, sawtooth, etc) to use as well.

You have to pay attention as I have seen vendors use pictures and descriptions of raplettes indiscriminantly, showing or describing an adjustable one when they're offering the fixed one, etc. Low prices should make you check twice what you're ordering.

Brian Ibbotson

Pastry Sous for Production and Menu Research & Development

Sous Chef for Food Safety and Quality Assurance

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The difference in price (about 90-110 vs. 200-250) is usually whether its fixed or not, or whether it has the comb feature.

If you always want to slide a specific height, like always just for biscuit or for chocolate, a fixed raplette is fine (or even make your own our of thin sheet metal). But the usefulness of adjusting the height is wonderful. The more expensive ones have a set of thumbscrews for attaching a set of fluted combs (curved, sawtooth, etc) to use as well.

You have to pay attention as I have seen vendors use pictures and descriptions of raplettes indiscriminantly, showing or describing an adjustable one when they're offering the fixed one, etc. Low prices should make you check twice what you're ordering.

Thanks for the warning. The $90 raplette is pictured as adjustable but it's worth asking about.

How useful is a fluted comb, and what is it good for?

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David,

Any idea what brand name the raplette was? I'm in the market for one, and having trouble finding a decent one.

Luis

Sorry, I didn't catch the brand name. You might call the French Pastry School or send them an email and ask.

Thanks David, I didn't even think of that.

Luis

Luis,

If you were in FLA at Schott's class you could ask him what he uses! Sorry you couldn't make it. I'll ask him for you tomorrow if you like.

Cheri

Hi Cheri,

Andrew used one made by Pavoni, but I've tried with no success on tracking one down made by them.

Luis

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The difference in price (about 90-110 vs. 200-250) is usually whether its fixed or not, or whether it has the comb feature.

If you always want to slide a specific height, like always just for biscuit or for chocolate, a fixed raplette is fine (or even make your own our of thin sheet metal). But the usefulness of adjusting the height is wonderful. The more expensive ones have a set of thumbscrews for attaching a set of fluted combs (curved, sawtooth, etc) to use as well.

You have to pay attention as I have seen vendors use pictures and descriptions of raplettes indiscriminantly, showing or describing an adjustable one when they're offering the fixed one, etc. Low prices should make you check twice what you're ordering.

How is the adjustment made? is it a screw?

Luis

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The difference in price (about 90-110 vs. 200-250) is usually whether its fixed or not, or whether it has the comb feature.

If you always want to slide a specific height, like always just for biscuit or for chocolate, a fixed raplette is fine (or even make your own our of thin sheet metal). But the usefulness of adjusting the height is wonderful. The more expensive ones have a set of thumbscrews for attaching a set of fluted combs (curved, sawtooth, etc) to use as well.

You have to pay attention as I have seen vendors use pictures and descriptions of raplettes indiscriminantly, showing or describing an adjustable one when they're offering the fixed one, etc. Low prices should make you check twice what you're ordering.

Thanks for the warning. The $90 raplette is pictured as adjustable but it's worth asking about.

How useful is a fluted comb, and what is it good for?

Couldn't it also be used to spread chocolate for making those poodle curls that was discussed in the Grewling tread? Not sure of others uses.

Edited by mrose (log)

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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The difference in price (about 90-110 vs. 200-250) is usually whether its fixed or not, or whether it has the comb feature.

If you always want to slide a specific height, like always just for biscuit or for chocolate, a fixed raplette is fine (or even make your own our of thin sheet metal). But the usefulness of adjusting the height is wonderful. The more expensive ones have a set of thumbscrews for attaching a set of fluted combs (curved, sawtooth, etc) to use as well.

You have to pay attention as I have seen vendors use pictures and descriptions of raplettes indiscriminantly, showing or describing an adjustable one when they're offering the fixed one, etc. Low prices should make you check twice what you're ordering.

Thanks for the warning. The $90 raplette is pictured as adjustable but it's worth asking about.

How useful is a fluted comb, and what is it good for?

Couldn't it also be used to spread chocolate for making those poodle curls that was discussed in the Grewling tread? Not sure of others uses.

yes, I believe your right. to make those poodle curls, it does require a comb.

luis

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