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Sinbad

Reports on Hong Kong dining

791 posts in this topic

I just got back to the States after a very long flight. I can feel that jet-lag creeping up, but wanted to post some more photos from my short time in Hong Kong.

After the first night, we went to to Luk Yu Teahouse for some dim-sum. A friend, who is from Hong Kong, had recommended we go there as it is one of the most famous teahouses in the city. We made the rookie mistake of going after 11 a.m. and missed out on the carts. We were stuck with the English menu and a surly waiter who seemed insistent on giving us the tourist treatment. We did manage to order a few dishes of of the very limited menu and it was good--not great. We are going to try another place before we leave and we'll hopefully find some more varieties of dumplings there.

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Sticky rice

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Singapore noodles

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Crispy squid

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Shrimp dumplings

The next day was a sightseeing day and we saw some beautiful temples and other sights around the city. It is amazing how different certain parts are from the bustle of the downtown area. I convinced my family to follow me to a little dive noodle bar that Bourdain has covered on his show. The place is run by some body builders and it was awesome (and fast). My sister, Dad, and I got the beef brisket soup with noodles and my mom got the pork knuckle soup with noodles. It was great. Full-flavored broth and chewy noodles with good bite. I would definitely recommend it.

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Poster on the wall

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Brisket soup

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Pork knuckle soup

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Noodles in the pork knuckle soup

Once our tour guide realized how food-crazy we all were, he decided to take us to a dried seafood market where many locals and restaurants shop. I have to admit the smell of all the dried seafood is pretty intense and overwhelming. But, it was cool to speak to the people and find out all the different uses for the many types of dried items. One thing that caught my eye were these chunks of smoked (?) pig's head.

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Bins of dried seafood

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A very large shark fin

My first taste of Shanghai soup buns was here in Hong Kong some ten years ago, so I was determined to have some again. My Dad picked a Shanghai restaurant, called Ye Shanghai, in the Marco Polo Hotel in Kowloon. I don't know much about food from Shanghai, but we really enjoyed the dishes we ordered.

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Shanghai soup buns

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Crispy chicken

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Fried tofu with chilis and cashews

On our last night, we decided to go to a Szechuan restaurant, called Yunyan Szechuan Restaurant. My only Szechuan experiences had been in Grand Sichuan in New York and a fabulous place here in Atlanta called, Tasty China. I was anxious to try it in China and the place had rave reviews. I was not disappointed at all.

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Spicy cabbage

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Fish poached in chili oil--wow. The fish had a confit-like texture and it had nice bite. Loved it against the contrast of the raw green onions. I could not stop eating it.

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A close-up of the peppercorns

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My favorite of the night: Shan City Beef--this dish was definitely ma la! My mouth was vibrating for a good 2 hours after eating it. The effect of the peppercorn is not for everybody, but I loved it. The beef was so tender and I loved the flavors. I often order a chicken version at my local spot, but beef may be working its way into the rotation.

The trip was so much fun. Seeing Tokyo and Hong Kong in one go was an interesting study in contrasts and I definitely had some good food. I can't decide which place I like more because they are so beautiful in their own way.

I hope to go back soon.

Hope you enjoy the photos as much as I enjoyed taking them.

Jennifer


Edited by The Blissful Glutton (log)

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I know exactly where your first photo was taken Jennifer....made me want to dive right thru the frame like Alice in the Looking Glass and grab a bite to eat, buy some ingredients I can't find here, then jump back out ha...or maybe I'd stay :smile:

loved your report, lucky you

ps. Luk Yu is aggravating


Edited by insomniac (log)

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Did you bring back any food items?

If these reports aren't enticing for a food trip to Tokyo or Hong Kong, I don't know what would be. Outstanding photos! Thanks for sharing.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Beautiful photos! I wish I could focus that well with a camera. Heck, I wish I could focus that well without a camera.

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Thanks everyone!

It was a great trip.

Doc: I did---some ground chili from Japan (for soba), powdered green tea and shoyu from Kyoto, some knives (of course), teas from China, and some spicy lotus root chips I found.

You can see all my photos (I did not post all of them here) from Hong Kong by clicking HERE.


Edited by The Blissful Glutton (log)

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My wife just loves the lo mai gai as she tells me it is pronounced (her parents are from Hong Kong) Lo Mai Gai.


officially left egullet....

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Ah Leung’s Hong Kong home-coming trip

Pre-trip Prologue

Friends: It is my turn to post a topic to ask for some Hong Kong restaurant recommendations! LOL! No, just kidding.

Plane tickets are booked. Hotel rooms are booked. Power adapters bought. Bags… almost packed. I and my wife are leaving for Hong Kong on vacation starting the next weekend. A solid 21 day stay. 21 days to stuff my stomach with local food! I anticipated I probably would gain 21 pounds from this trip. But it would be worth it!

It’s been too long, eight years to be exact, since I have been back to the place where I grew up in the 60’s and 70’s. And that seems a life-time ago. It was a time before I became a foodie. To me, this is not an occasional traveler dropping by for a two to three day visit exploring an exotic place in the “Orient” or a businessman passing through for a sales meeting for a day. Rather, this is more like getting re-acclimated with a familiar yet ever-changing, ever “life in a fast lane” life style.

It is risky to post a trip report before the trip is even taken. What if I end up eating mediocre food? Now that I am committed. I cannot back out. On the other hand, I had so much fun posting my foodblog on eGullet in February around Chinese New Year. I just want to repeat a similar experience. I enjoy the interactions in the forum as I explore the unknowns in my journey everyday. Your comments may actually affect what I will do and eat while in Hong Kong!

I wished to write a journal during my trip and post it while I am on the road. But…I am no Peter Green. I don’t think I can handle it. I am hoping to be able to upload a teaser picture or two everyday, and provide the balance with more details when I come back to the states whenever I can get to it.

I am not a five-star kind of a guy. There probably won’t be any report on Aqua, Petrus, Spoon or the likes. I grew up eating food in the streets of Hong Kong. Food for the commons: Jook, Deep-Fried Cruellers, Soy-Sauce Chow Mein, Cheung Fun and the likes, you will probably find plenty. These street food are becoming harder and harder to find in the streets of Hong Kong. As the society advances, most street hawkers once dominated every corner have been chased down by the government for the sake of maintaining city orders. Most of the street food once offered only by hawkers are now sold as dim sum items in big restaurants or tiny convenient stores with a small store-front. These hawkers still exist, I believe. But only in certain pockets of places. I have a hunch of where some of them might be. During this trip I will try to hunt them down to relive this childhood memory once again.

Other places to eat, oh there are too many that have danced in my head:

- Cantonese “pick your own fish” seafood in Cheung Chau, Lee Yue Moon or Sai Kung

- Young pigeons in Sha Tin

- The Typoon Shelter style fried crab in Causeway Bay

- Oysters in Lau Fau Shan (still there?)

- Chinese bakeries in Yuen Long

- Chiu Chow beefballs in Tsim Sha Tsui

- Cantonese banquet food: shake fin, suckling pig and abalone

- Cantonese hot pots

- Rice in clay pots

Along with many regional style Chinese food in Hong Kong such as Hakka, Chiu Chow, Shanghai, Sichuan, Hunan, plus other foreign food such as Vietnamese, Japanese, Italian, Thai, and Indonesian (but no McDonald’s, thank you). For a three week stay, it would be nice to sample some of these cuisines as interpreted in Hong Kong.

Places to visit: besides the familiar Victoria Peak, Stanley, Po Lin Temple and the likes, I want to spend some time in visiting something new: Heritage Museum, Military Museum, Hong Kong Central Library, Two IFC and other spots that popped up only in the past few years. During my last visit, the third cross-harbour tunnel and Ching Ma Bridge were only under construction. Hong Kong is a very dynamic place. Every couple of years, the look can be completely different because of new land reclamations and additions of new structures. I would visit as many places as I can manage to pack into my three weeks – including two to three hiking trips. The only exception is Hong Kong Disney. Sorry Walt. I used to live only 20 miles from the original Disneyland in Anaheim, California created by Walt Disney himself. I don’t think I would be overly eager to fly over 7000 miles to see a look-alike Main Street and meet Mr. Mickey Mouse. That’s okay.

By all means please post your comments about my trip. Every reply will be read and appreciated, and I hope would have time to respond to.


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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Ahem!

I expect you'll gain more than 21 pounds inspite of the 2 or 3 hiking trips - 'cos you must eat one portion for yourself, one portion for Dai Gah Jeah Dejah, and finish what your good wife cannot! :laugh::laugh:

Looking forward to your teasers and final report, Silow.


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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YOU DIDN'T MENTION PACKING THE CAMERA. PLEASE SAY YOU'RE TAKING A CAMERA !!!!


Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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YOU DIDN'T MENTION PACKING THE CAMERA.  PLEASE SAY YOU'RE TAKING A CAMERA !!!!

What camera? :laugh::laugh:

Yes, yes. Cameras. I bought a Nikon D80 Digital SLR for the trip. I got tired of the "dummy" digitals that don't allow for any control (auto-focus, auto-aperture, auto-everything except to auto crisp up my food pictures). I love digital SLRs. I won't ever go back to the dummy digitals. My Canon is now my wife's so she can shoot flowers or whatever that pleases her. :laugh:


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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This is going to be goooooood............ :smile:

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this is my first post like in like 5 months......... but HKG, how can i forget HKG...

-----------------------------------------------------------

i was there in the spring, this year. was blown away. completely and utterly! the beef brisket noodle soup...... good god....<me immediately slips into a food coma upon hearing the words beef brisket noodle soup>.......good god..... i had 2 in a row.

i think it's better to use a good P&S for food pics rather than a 'fancy' camera while abroad. i have a D70s/Nikkor 18-200 VR myself and did have to use it sometimes for the food pics during the trip when my P&S crappped out on me. not recommended! however, if you have your heart set on it then all i can say is it will be a little frustrating.

bom apetit, in the city of gastronomy.


Edited by BonVivantNL (log)

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YAY! I can't wait to see the pictures and the discriptions. I have never been to Hong Kong but so wanted to visit. :wub: Thanks Ah Leung!

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Gosh, Xiao hzrt -- that is some undertaking! You might need some help. (hint hint) Help with the language? No-- you speak Cantonese so I can't help there. How about English! Nope --- you've got that locked up too. How about a 'mama' figure to make sure you DO put on those 21 pounds???? LOLOL! With the food you anticipate, I don't think you will have any trouble in that area, either!

So, I will remain here and live your trip thru your words and eat up every bite as you describe them!

How lucky we are to have you there, especially since you plan an 'off the beaten track' food tour. Such fun you are going to have!!!! We will all be waiting --enviously!!

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It has always been my dream, since I can't remember how long ago, to eat my way thru Hong Kong, and lucky you, you'll do it for me! I can't wait! :rolleyes::biggrin:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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21 days!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?! That's horrible!!! What could you possibly do in HK for 21 days?!?!?!??!??!?!?! Why would you want to go there for 21 days!!?!?!??!?!?!?!?

Other than to make us all jealous! :angry:

I want to go, too! I'm not so far away, just fly me over for a weekend. I promise I'll tag along quietly.

Where are you staying? Did you get an apartment hotel, or a hotel hotel?

I need to plan my future trips. :smile:

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this is my first post like in like 5 months......... but HKG, how can i forget HKG...

i think it's better to use a good P&S for food pics rather than a 'fancy' camera while abroad.  i have a D70s/Nikkor 18-200 VR myself and did have to use it sometimes for the food pics during the trip when my P&S crappped out on me.  not recommended!  however, if you have your heart set on it then all i can say is it will be a little frustrating. 

Don't name a city after an airport code! :laugh:

Thanks for the camera tips BonVivantNL. I did a dry run last weekend and am happy with the D80. Switched off the AF, go manual. The dishes looked much sharper. If I get a bad picture, I would have only my own fingers to blame. The Canon P&S will be my spare.

Beef brisket noodle soups are everywhere in HK. It's one of my all time favorites too. The trick is to find the extraordinary ones from the good ones.


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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Where are you staying?  Did you get an apartment hotel, or a hotel hotel? 

I need to plan my future trips. :smile:

Booked at Harbour Plaza Hotel, Hung Hom Rona. This hotel is built on reclaimed land next to the Kowloon KCR (railroad) Station. Will check in under the stage name of Foo Ling Yu if you want to look me up. :laugh::laugh:


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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oh this should be great, cant wait to read your posts! hope you can visit some of my favs. like the cheese lobster at Chuk Yuen in Happy Valley, or the Pork Chop with steamed vegetables at delicious kitchen in Causewaybay.

Have fun and bon apetit!


Edited by somemale (log)

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How excellent! I'd like to make it out to HK one day. After I've brought my Cantonese up to an acceptable level... :raz:

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oh this should be great, cant wait to read your posts! hope you can visit some of my favs. like the cheese lobster at Chuk Yuen in Happy Valley, or the Pork Chop with steamed vegetables at delicious kitchen in Causewaybay.

Thanks somemale. Is "delicious kitchen" the name of the restaurant?


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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How excellent! I'd like to make it out to HK one day. After I've brought my Cantonese up to an acceptable level... :raz:

It certainly helps to speak the language (Cantonese). But you can get by with speaking English too. Most Hong Kong locals are bilingual (or you can find someone who is to help). But one bad thing is most Hong Kongers... when they see you and if you look Chinese, they automatically assume you speak Cantonese!


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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