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Sinbad

Reports on Hong Kong dining

791 posts in this topic

spot on DG, normally in HK you have to ask for a Filipino San Mig or you will get the vastly inferior local brew....big mistake for a beer drinker to make...

No such thing as local brewed San Mig here in HK any more. Although San Mig has been quiet about it, in September last year they closed the Yuen Long (HK) brewery, and since then all their Hong Kong beer has been coming from their Guangdong plant. It's even worse than the HK-brewed product.

However, because of the increase in value of the RMB and also because the GD plant is getting close to capacity, they're tentatively planning on re-opening Yuen Long next year.


Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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spot on DG, normally in HK you have to ask for a Filipino San Mig or you will get the vastly inferior local brew....big mistake for a beer drinker to make...

No such thing as local brewed San Mig here in HK any more. Although San Mig has been quiet about it, in September last year they closed the Yuen Long (HK) brewery, and since then all their Hong Kong beer has been coming from their Guangdong plant. It's even worse than the HK-brewed product.

However, because of the increase in value of the RMB and also because the GD plant is getting close to capacity, they're tentatively planning on re-opening Yuen Long next year.

I suppose just importing more from the PI is out of the question? :sad:

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April 1 – Strange Stool Samples

And so, after my brief, odd stopover in Hong Kong, it was time to be finally heading home.

I’d promised a shot of the dwarves in my room at Jia, and I do hate to disappoint.

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Of course, I could be wrong. They may be gnomes. It’s a tough choice.

As for the middle stool……..I’m stumped.

I took a cab to the airport, rather than try to negotiate my wounded luggage through to the train. This gave me time to reflect on my visit to the “new” Hong Kong.

This trip isn’t really a basis for any conclusions. I should come back for more of an extended stay. As a tag-on to the Japan jaunt, it was pleasant enough, and I was glad that I’d stumbled into a structure (of sorts) for my day.

I was also very glad that I contained myself to the stretch from Causeway Bay to Central. That was enough for a day. I’m getting old, after all.

To me, though, it felt that something was missing. The feeling I’d had back in the early 90’s – that there was just money flying past you everywhere, and all you had to do was just reach out and grab it – that was gone. That feeling of holding a live wire, which I’d felt recently in Shanghai wasn’t here anymore.

But, like I say, it was just a day. And a rainy, enclosed day, at that.

Still, with the exception of accommodations the prices had all been right, coming from Tokyo. I may revise that opinion after a return to Bangkok, but for now Hong Kong was good value for money.

And I found that I still had some left. A deplorable condition for someone like me. I burned the last of my HKD on foodstuffs at the airport, grabbing some mochi and bags of shredded “Korean-style” squid snacks.

If you want to put that certain glint into your girl’s eye, shredded squid snacks are just the thing, say I.

My hand carry bursting with a mispacked jam of breath-mint-challenging snacks, I was back in the lounge.

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This time I had more of an appetite, and ordered a bowl of the noodles from the noodle bar. In return for my order, I received an air-hockey puck with an LED.

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That seemed to call for a beer, so, given that this was the end of the Japan trip, I went for a brewed-in-China Kirin (they also own a big stake in San Miguel, touching on our last discussion). The two kept good company, at least until the puck started flashing. This seemed to offend the beer, so I took the puck away and traded it for some noodles.

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And from there, it was in the air, and back in the capable catering of Cathay Pacific.

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The seared tuna I’d had on the outbound leg was still the appetizer, but it was dressed now with some asparagus, which isn’t something I can get enough of.

The main was just beef. I’d really been hoping they’d do that pork belly they’d had on the Hong Kong/Japan flight, but I suppose that would be asking too much.

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(I was sorely, sorely tempted to make off with the salt and pepper shakers they had on the tray. )

I finished with cheese, fruit, and port, just to give some semblance of health to my trip.

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There. Two and a half weeks away from home, and it felt like it was time to get back to a normal life. I had most of Japan still to write, another load of video tape to add to the pile waiting for editing, and some food to cook (I did some vegetable shopping in Hong Kong).

And I could really, really, really use a weekend doing nothing.

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gallery_22892_5999_16068.jpg

....

(I was sorely, sorely tempted to make off with the salt and pepper shakers they had on the tray. )

Oh, that photo makes me hungry. I just love the Cathay lounge dan dan mein. The Cathay lounges in HK are catered by The Peninsula, and they do a good job.

You didn't used to have to think about pocketing those CX biz-class salt and pepper shakers; they used to sell them with the duty-free stuff on the airplane. They stopped selling them last year, but if you ask one of the cabin crew nicely (especially on inbound-to-HK flights)...

Nice report.


Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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Awesome travelogue!!

You always do such a great job and I love reading your summaries! :smile:

Which reminds me...I should digg up some pics of my own. :unsure:

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Ok, let me try my hand at this. This will be my first travel log with image post so please be patient with me.

I visited and stayed at Hong Kong last week for 5 nights. My last visit to HK was in 1990 so I don't recall much but was very impressed with the improvements on infrastructure and technology compared to the US. And the food, let's talk about food.

Day 1

My flight arrived at around 7:00pm and I took the MTR route to the hotel compared to taking a taxi or airport shuttle bus. MTR cost $70 HKD, not bad compared to almost double the price for an airport shuttle. I arrived at Kowloon station and took the free Airport Express to my hotel. By this time, it was around 8ish and I had to meet part of my family at Yung Kee Restaurant at the Central District at 9pm.

Fast forward, after taking the wrong shuttle and rather walking across the street to the MTR station and figuring out which street Yung Kee is on, I arrive at Yung Kee at around 9:30ish with part of my family hungrily waiting for me. I didn't take any pictures on this meal because my sister's friend was sitting on the table and I was extremely late plus my family started dining without me.

We had Yung Kee's famous Roasted Goose (I wasn't very impressed, the meat was dry, bland and tough), Sauteed Scallop's w/ vegetables (the best dish of the night), Yang Chow Chow Fan (good), Chinese Brocolli w/ oyster sauce. (Sorry, I can't remember much of the other dishes)


Edited by Greystreet (log)

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Day 2

Dimsum was at Luk Yue Tea House, one of the oldest dims um houses in HK.


Edited by Greystreet (log)

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hey Greystreet....look forward to more in your report, esp. the pix!

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Luk Yu Teahouse

Main Entrance to Luk Yu

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Braised Pork Belly w/ steamed buns

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Pork Liver Siu Mai - The combination of the liver with the siu mai was quite tasty but the liver alone tasted just like, plain liver.

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Pork Siu Mai w/ tobiko and Steamed Pork Spareribs

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Deep Fried Shrimp Balls and Milk Custard w/ sweet and spicy sauce - I ordered this dish mainly for one of my favorites, Deep Fried Milk Custards.

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Steamed Chicken and Mushroom Bun

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Dining Room on the 2nd floor of Luk Yu, the waiters wear white coats. This was around 2pm and the place wasn't packed compared to high noon.

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Random pic that my 9 year old niece took at the teahouse

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Luk Yu Teahouse

24 - 26 Stanley St.

Central District

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How did you find Luk Yu compared to other dim sum places in HK? I've only been there once, maybe 10 years ago, and I think I went to the other branch. What I had was good, but I don't remember it being spectacular (possibly because I kept ordering the wrong things...).

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How did you find Luk Yu compared to other dim sum places in HK?  I've only been there once, maybe 10 years ago, and I think I went to the other branch.  What I had was good, but I don't remember it being spectacular (possibly because I kept ordering the wrong things...).

I will post another short report on another dim sum place that a local brought us too (if Image Gullet doesn't give me a hard time) to compare with Luk Yu.

In terms of quality, (like you said) I thought Luk Yu was ok, not bad but not outstanding and I believe it was quite expensive compared to other Dim Sum places.

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Day 2 continued...

My family and I started to walk the streets of Tsim Sha Tsui in search of dinner. We randomly stumbled upon

Chuk Yuen Seafood Restaurant

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Random pictures of live seafood at the restaurant entrance

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Live Mantis Shrimps

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Giant Clams and Abalone

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Jumbo Prawns

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Live Lobsters

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Garoupa or Grouper two ways, filet and braised - I preferred the braised grouper over the filet. The filet was a little dry and firm for my taste.

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Minced Squab Lettuce Cups - this dish was mighty tasty

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Steamed Jumbo Prawns w/garlic - one of my favorite ways to eat jumbo prawns

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Dry Fried Chinese Long Beans w/ red chiles - one of my favorite long bean dishes, this was seasoned well and very tasty. The long beans were wider and of different variety.

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Fujian Fried Rice - look at the pic, need I say more?

Overall, I enjoyed this meal. The restaurant didn't have a bigger selection of live seafood in their tanks but was adequate enough for my palate. I sensed that this restaurant was inbetween a tourist trap and also catered to locals. I saw quite a few Japanese tourist groups in the restaurant while we were dining. There are two locations for Chuk Yuen.

Chuk Yuen Seafood Restaurant

35 Kimberley Road

Tsim Sha Tsui

Tel 3106 5868

Fax 3106 5636

Chuk Yuen Seafood Restaurant

Basement, Hong Kong Pacific centre

28 Hankow Road

Tsim Sha Tsui

Tel 2722 0633

Fax 2722 6961

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I sensed that this restaurant was inbetween a tourist trap and also catered to locals.  I saw quite a few Japanese tourist groups in the restaurant while we were dining.

I think you pegged the place quite well. Chuk Yuen caters to tourists, but I wouldn't call it a tourist trap. I live 2 blocks away from the Hankow Rd location, and the only times I've been there is with visitors who insisted on going because that's where they always go when they come to town. But that's not necessarily a bad thing. Most 'tablecloth' TST restaurants cater to tourists, and Chuk Yuen has been around for a while and they do a decent job.


Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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You went to Chuk Yuen and you didn't get the cheese lobster?!?!?!

Perhaps the TST location of Chuk Yuen is catered more for tourists, however the Happy Valley location that I MUST visit whenever I go back to HK is definitely filled with locals.

The cheese lobster is definitely the best lobster dish in the world for me. There is nothing like it anywhere else. They do the sauce to perfection. Rich, creamy and exteremly addictive.

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I am not a big fan of Sharks Fin soup, however they seem to do it really well at Chuk Yuen, definitely a must order for me whenver I visit.

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We also ordered some Mantis Shrimp (aka Pissing Shrimp) with fried garlic.

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You can't go to a chinese seafood restaurant without ordering the steamed grouper....

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I'm not a fan of geoduck, but I was told it was excellent as well

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And just to mix things up a bit, Seafood Claypot Rice and some Satay Beef (which is done really well, especially for a seafood restaurant).

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And to end every chinese meal, the complimentary dessert. Red Bean Soup and Do Hu Hua.

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As I stated before, Chuk Yuen is always a must for me whenever I go back to HK.

The cheese lobster is worth the plane ticket to Hong Kong alone...

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Does your lobster dish have noodles in it? Next time, order it with yee mien, it's better than rice for all that sauce.

And I've only been to the Happy Valley branch too - it's right near the tram's final stop.


Edited by aprilmei (log)

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I guess I have to revisit Chuk Yuen for the cheese lobster!

I really liked the food at Chuk Yuen, I didn't say it was bad in anyway, I just saw quite a few tourists there.

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Day 3

Typhoon Signal Number 8 - most businesses were closed till noon...

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I stayed indoors and enjoyed this:

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After the Typhoon Signal was lowered to 3, I ventured out to the following:

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and bought the following baked goods to eat on the street:

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Late lunch at:

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for some Chinese BBQ

Salted Egg, Sausage, Roast Pork, Soy Sauce Chicken

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Suckling Pig

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My love for Soft Shell Crabs led to this dish:

Salt and Pepper Soft Shell Crabs

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Oh, you were here for the last big typhoon - that was a good one, wasn't it? My good, I mean "real" - sometimes they raise the typhoon 8 signal and it bypasses us or just sort of fades away to nothing. I have the type of job where I have to work during typhoons but I was finished with most of my work so I took the day off and enjoyed watching the the storm, happy that I wasn't out in it.

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Day 4 - rain has mainly stopped

Late (2pm) dim sum lunch at:

Majesty Seafood Restaurant

Pan fried stuffed tofu sheets

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Char Siu Bao

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Shrimp and Chives

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Siu Mai

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Steamed Sticky Rice - this had shredded dried scallops along with chicken meat

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Har Gaw - look at the size of their dim sum. This Har Gaw was filled with 3 whole shrimps!

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Dessert - Egg white, milk and coconut juice custard steamed in young coconut

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Majesty Seafood Restaurant

3rd Floor, Regent Center Building

88 Queen's Road

Central, Hong Kong

Little advice, Majesty offers 10% off entire bill after 2 pm.

I preferred this dimsum over Luk Yu Teahouse. Majesty might not be historical but the quality of food, price, value and service is way ahead of Luk Yu.

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While in Hong Kong we had the Four Seasons book us a dinner at a private dining club called "XiYan" (www.xiyan.com.hk), and I saved the menu for what we ate below. This certainly wasn't touristy, it was a modern cantonese 12 course banquet to be shared by 4 people and cost about $250 total. The food was a mix of standard fare (dan dan noodle for example) with more exotic modern cantonese fare (friend pomelo skins for example). In terms of value we were blown away, as several items were simply delicious like the wagyu, the crab and the grouper, while there were a couple misses like the soup, the dessert and the watercress dish coming last (would have been fine as a side earlier). The service was also very friendly, so if you are looking for something with that's not trendy and hip (you can dress pretty casual), but is somewhat progressive cantonese cuisine, then I'd recommend this spot.

12 course "seafood" tasting

Appetizers

Pan fried wagyu beef steak with duo sauces

Stir fried pomelo skins served with shrimp eggs and XO sauce

Crispy sparerib bites with preserved tangerine peel

Auntie's renren (Chinese Olives)

Entrees

Chicken in hot and spicy sauce with "century" eggs, peanuts and broad glass noodles

Stir fried whole crab with kimchi and rice cakes

Water chestnut sorbet with bird's nest

Chicken, coconut, white fungus and red date soup

Deep fried grouper with lemongrass, shrimp paste and pomelo salad

Xi Yan dan dan noodles

Stir fried watercress with preserved flowering cabbage

Dessert

Sago Melaka (small tapioca pearls in coconut milk with molasses sauce)

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While in Hong Kong we had the Four Seasons book us a dinner at a private dining club called "XiYan" (www.xiyan.com.hk), and I saved the menu for what we ate below.  This certainly wasn't touristy, it was a modern cantonese 12 course banquet to be shared by 4 people and cost about $250 total. 

Sounds great! I won't be going back to HK for at least a year, but does XiYan only take groups, or can you go as a party of one or two?

And is that $250 HK dollars?

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How did you find Luk Yu compared to other dim sum places in HK?  I've only been there once, maybe 10 years ago, and I think I went to the other branch.  What I had was good, but I don't remember it being spectacular (possibly because I kept ordering the wrong things...).

I will post another short report on another dim sum place that a local brought us too (if Image Gullet doesn't give me a hard time) to compare with Luk Yu.

In terms of quality, (like you said) I thought Luk Yu was ok, not bad but not outstanding and I believe it was quite expensive compared to other Dim Sum places.

Me and my wife ate at Luk Yu twice and neither time were we really impressed. It seems far more like regular NY Chinatown dim sum to me than like something special. The place is fairly run down, service was ok, the food really didn't impress. Perhaps I'm being a bit unfair, after all it was good... we were just disappointed since it was our first taste of this miraculous thing we heard about called "Hong Kong dim sum" which is meant to be way more special than anything else out there.

We were however very impressed with the Sunday dim sum at Maxim's Palace. Make sure you get there EARLY, cause the place get's super packed about an hour into service and you can find yourself lining up outside the door. If you do get there early it's pretty funny as you get to join the mini yet mad dash of people that literally run to secure a specific spot in the massive massive room once people are let in (window tables go quickly).

We ate a TON between me and my wife, and everything was delicious, definitely lived up to our expectations for excellent yet traditional dim sum. I think our servers thought we were crazy seeing how much food we ordered and ate, we literally racked up some $80 in food, a damn near impossibility, but we just kept wanting to taste everything (tripe and feet included!). I would recommend the place in a heartbeat over Luk Yu.

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Xi Yan has been around for years; I don't think it's still a private kitchen (in other words, it has a license) but it's a private kitchen concept (you eat what the chef, Jacky Yu, wants to cook). The space is much bigger than it used to be. Jacky also opened three "regular" restaurants, Xi Yan Sweets (it's not just a dessert place), Xi Yan Tastes and Xi Yan Flavours. Their food is quite good, with some dishes the same as what he serves at Xi Yan, except it's a la carte.

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While in Hong Kong we had the Four Seasons book us a dinner at a private dining club called "XiYan" (www.xiyan.com.hk), and I saved the menu for what we ate below.  This certainly wasn't touristy, it was a modern cantonese 12 course banquet to be shared by 4 people and cost about $250 total. 

Sounds great! I won't be going back to HK for at least a year, but does XiYan only take groups, or can you go as a party of one or two?

And is that $250 HK dollars?

~$250 US was the total bill for 4 (we didn't drink alcohol), but we were told they had a 4 person minimum (although perhaps this only applies to the Four Seasons bookings, but I doubt it). Given that they were very generous with the kobe, you get a whole fish, a whole crab (which is very expensive in HK) and 4 small portions of birds nest atop sorbet, that alone almost made up the price in our (biased NY) book. So we felt pretty good about the price we paid, and we left stuffed.

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external images are not allowed so here are links to the photos: 'supreme' beef brisket. the place where i eat this is really called 'supreme beef brisket' lol

i really like this beef brisket curry. the first brisket curry for me.

more to come! i've started working on the photos from my last oinking trip.

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