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Starchefs International Chefs Congress 2007


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Getting miked

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David Bouley, Jonathon McDonald and George Mendes go over pre-demonstration details.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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American Ingredients, Japanese Technique was the focus of David Bouley's demonstration. He announced an upcoming restaurant project with Yushiki Tsuji, the head of the prestigious Tsuji Culinary Institute in Osaka Japan and someone Bouley has collaborated with for many years.

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Bouley talked about his relationship with Tsuji and their mutual influence on each other and especially Tsuji's influence on him as Bouley became more and more attuned to Japanese technique and ingredients over the twenty odd years of their association so far. For his demonstration, Chef Bouley made fresh tofu garnished with dashi broth, mushrooms and greens.

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To make the Tofu, Bouley mixed soy milk and egg white before straining through a chinois. After adding a couple of drops of white soy sauce, he steamed the mixture at 90ºC for 14 minutes.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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David Bouley greeted by Jose Andres on stage and back after Bouley's presentation.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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After Chef Bouley's demonstration, Antoinette bruno and Will Blunt came out to present a surprise special award,, the 2007 New York Rising Stars Mentor Award. This award, voted on by the 2007 Rising Star Chefs, is to "honor the mentor chef who does the most to support young chefs in his local industry, and help them succeed." The recipient for this year's award was Daniel Boulud. Chef Boulud, gracious as always talked about the amazing growth of culinary skill and knowledge in the United States over the past twenty years, putting the United States at least on a par with Europe in terms of culinary talent, skill and output.

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Daniel Boulud was congratulated by another great NYC Chef mentor with the initials "DB", David Bouley

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Boulud and Bouley backstage with George Mendes and Ken Oringer

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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AS Wylie Dufresne was setting up for his demonstration onstage, backstage there was an interesting confluence of legendary culinary talent.

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Joel Robuchon and Daniel Boulud share thoughts while Bruno Bertin looks on.

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With Robuchon and Boulud in the background, David Bouley and Bruno Goussault converse

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David Bouley, Bruno Bertin, Joel Robuchon, Daniel Bouley, Bruno Goussault and Yosuke Suga

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Doc, a technique question. Did you get the scoop on boning that hamo fish? What was the method exactly?

Chris, having seen and listened to it once while taking photos, I'm not sure I can recount the technique exactly :biggrin: , but I'll try my best. In a nutshell, they used a CT scan to locate in detail the anatomical location of all the bones. They then used a special knife to make many small incisions in the flesh through which they extracted all the bones. He used an edited video to illustrate the process, though it wasn't in excruciating detail. My strong suspicion is that there is a pretty steep learning curve to this technique. Perhaps someone else who was there and in the audience can give a better explanation of the process.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Doc, a technique question. Did you get the scoop on boning that hamo fish? What was the method exactly?

Chris, having seen and listened to it once while taking photos, I'm not sure I can recount the technique exactly :biggrin: , but I'll try my best. In a nutshell, they used a CT scan to locate in detail the anatomical location of all the bones. They then used a special knife to make many small incisions in the flesh through which they extracted all the bones. He used an edited video to illustrate the process, though it wasn't in excruciating detail. My strong suspicion is that there is a pretty steep learning curve to this technique. Perhaps someone else who was there and in the audience can give a better explanation of the process.

Hamo has thousands of small bones running through the flesh that can't be removed (he probably took the CT scan to show this). After you remove the filets, you need to make many incisions through the filet to cut up the bones (technique is called 'bonecutting'), otherwise it's inedible. Pretty standard Japanese technique.

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Doc, a technique question. Did you get the scoop on boning that hamo fish? What was the method exactly?

Chris, having seen and listened to it once while taking photos, I'm not sure I can recount the technique exactly :biggrin: , but I'll try my best. In a nutshell, they used a CT scan to locate in detail the anatomical location of all the bones. They then used a special knife to make many small incisions in the flesh through which they extracted all the bones. He used an edited video to illustrate the process, though it wasn't in excruciating detail. My strong suspicion is that there is a pretty steep learning curve to this technique. Perhaps someone else who was there and in the audience can give a better explanation of the process.

Hamo has thousands of small bones running through the flesh that can't be removed (he probably took the CT scan to show this). After you remove the filets, you need to make many incisions through the filet to cut up the bones (technique is called 'bonecutting'), otherwise it's inedible. Pretty standard Japanese technique.

Thanks!

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Wylie Dufresne was next at the podium

Developments in the wd-50 Kitchen was the understated label applied to Wylie's demonstration, which followed the special award given to Daniel Boulud. He described using various techniques many developed by himself to create new approaches to cooking and food.

"Pizza Pebbles", a dish at wd-50 with flavors reminiscent of pepperoni pizza with an entirely different texture has been discussed with differing opinions on the wd-50 topic in the NY Forum. I had the opportunity to taste them that very night at wd-50 and enjoyed them very much as the dissociation between the familiar flavor and its form was quite intriguing. (disclosure: The food portion of the meal was comped.). Chef Dufresne elaborated on the technique used to achieve the pebbles. A description of the dish along with a photo can be found here at Chadzilla's blog.. Wylie himself equated the pizza pebbles to "Pizza Combos." The dish is meant to be fun. At the Congress itself, Chef Dufresne did not make or have pizza pebbles, but he did offer samples of two other kinds of "pebbles" - "brown butter banana" and "peanut butter" - made with the same process.

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They were passed out by Erin Hollingsworth, Editorial Assistant for Starchefs

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Chef Dufresne flanked by eGullet Society Member and Starchefs photographer Michael Harlan Turkell and The Next Iron Chef contestant and Starchefs master of ceremonies, Aarón Sanchez

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Chef Dufresne also outlined techniques to emulate puffed snack products like "Funyuns", albeit more true to the actual onion, as well as his "knotted foie." One key point made by Chef Dufresne in discussing these and other novel techniques was that though these techniques may be cool and fun, they don't matter unless the final product tastes good. Specifically referring to the "knotted foie", he said, "it's cool that I can tie it in a knot, but if it doesn't taste good, it doesn't matter."

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Joel Robuchon watching Wylie Dufresne's demo backstage behind the main screen

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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gallery_8158_5171_45462.jpgClassic Sous Vide was the topic for Joel Robuchon, certainly one of and arguably the greatest chef(s) of the twentieth century who continues to produce fabulous food in his restaurants in the twentyfirst century.

He did this demonstration in conjunction with Dr. Bruno Goussault, chief scientist of Cuisine Solutions in Alexandria, VA. Dr. Goussault is widely credited as the father of sous vide cooking. In 1974 he began developing equipment to apply to industrial cooking using low temperature. His work continued over the years pioneering technique to achieve outstanding culinary results in a safe environment. In 1991 he founded the Centre de Recherche et d'Etudes pour l'Alimentation in Paris. Subsequently, this place became a training ground for many Michelin starred chefs for learning sous vide cooking techniques. Interestingly, Goussault's doctorate is in Economics, though he has a Master of Science in Food Technology degree as well.

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Robuchon discussed the knowledge accumulate over twenty years of using sous vide technique in fine dining, particularly in relation to fine temperature control and its effects on various products. His approach was animated as the attentive crowd hung on every word and image.

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Chef Robuchon's longtime assistant, Eric Bouchenoire of L'Atelier de Joel Robuchon - Paris working with eggs cooking at slightly different low temperatures.

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Chef Robuchon showing the deep green color achieved for spinach after cooking sous vide

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Starchefs editorial staff member Tejal Rao translating for Robuchon.

gallery_8158_5171_71382.jpgWorking with low temperature cooked eggs, Robuchon demonstrates their textural pliability when cooked at a specific temperature.

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Robuchon's slowly cooked egg with spinach cooked sous vide.

more to come...

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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the spinach was cooked through a series of compressions in the vacuum chamber.  there is no actual heat applied

Thanks Alex for replying.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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so how do I that with my Vac Packer?

I will leave this discussion to the professionals. :wink::smile: Please continue, while I proceed with the rest of my report.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Robuchon and his team prepared squab and foie gras wrapped inside a cabbage leaf and bacon and cooked sous vide. The following photos (hopefully) give a sense of that process:

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Eric Bouchenoire seasaoning the skin-on squab breasts.

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The not yet cooked squab roll

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Dr. Goussault fiddling with temp probes for the sous vide process.

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Bagging the squab

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I believe that they were wilting the cabbage leaf.

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Into the bath

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Out of the bath.

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The final product

Robuchon commented on cooking techniques wondering whether the "powders" in vogue today will still be around twenty or thirty years from now. He said that he can see the use of texture changing components, but wondered if they were really necessary. He also commented on the superior quality of cooks in America, saying that he used to think the Japanese made the best cooks in the world. He now thinks that it may be Americans.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Fabulous work, as always, Harlan! Thanks for sharing. :cool:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Thanks to Ideas in Food, the blog of Alex Talbot and Aki Kamozawa, Here's an article in PopSci.com on Starchefs ICC participant David Arnold.

THE FUTURE OF FOOD

Doctor Delicious

When the world's best chefs want something that defies the laws of physics, they come to one man: Dave Arnold, the DIY guru of high-tech cooking ...Dave Arnold would like to fix you a gin and tonic. Sound good? It will be. It will be very, very good. It will be like no gin and tonic you have ever seen or tasted in your life. It will also be considerably more involved, shall we say, than cracking open the Tanqueray and Schweppes.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Andoni Luis Aduriz preparing for his presentation the following morning

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Robuchon and Goussault's presentation was the last of the day which allowed for the audience to mix with them and amongst themselves after the session.

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Aaron Sanchez, Antoinette Bruno and Will Blunt compare notes at the end of the day

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Joel Robuchon and Bruno Goussault are greeted by Gualtiero Marchesi.

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Jose Andres is next.

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Yosuke Suga 2007 NY Rising Star Chef and Chef at L'Atelier de Joel Robuchon NY converses with Seiji Yamamoto.

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Chef Robuchon autographing books and programs

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Next was the Starchefs ICC Cocktail Party....

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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