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Two best meals in Boston


ulterior epicure
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Yeah, the will cook of the menu at CSB for you...don't be surprised to see things like cock's combs, organ meat...etc. I think is what he is saying.

If that's the case, then CSB is a must. I am an offal devotee. Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

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Yeah, the will cook of the menu at CSB for you...don't be surprised to see things like cock's combs, organ meat...etc. I think is what he is saying.

If that's the case, then CSB is a must. I am an offal devotee.

CSB is about as far as you can get from where you are staying ($30 cab ride) in a distinctly non-urban location--I find the sub-level room gloomy and the cult of Tony Maws a little creepy. O Ya is new face on the Boston scene--innovative sushi, but not open Monday night. (No 9 Park is open on Monday BTW). Much closer to your hotel. http://www.boston.com/ae/food/restaurants/...erene_hideaway/

Edited by WHS (log)
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Yeah, the will cook of the menu at CSB for you...don't be surprised to see things like cock's combs, organ meat...etc. I think is what he is saying.

If that's the case, then CSB is a must. I am an offal devotee.

CSB is about as far as you can get from where you are staying ($30 cab ride) in a distinctly non-urban location--I find the sub-level room gloomy and the cult of Tony Maws a little creepy.

I know for a fact that the T takes me into Harvard Square... how close is CSB to the campus?
O Ya is new face on the Boston scene--innovative sushi, but not open Monday night. (No 9 Park is open on Monday BTW).  Much closer to your hotel.  http://www.boston.com/ae/food/restaurants/...erene_hideaway/

WHS (or anyone else out there who has been to O Ya), please do me a favor and read this post on my blog, and then tell me if you still think I would enjoy eating at O Ya. Thanks!

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Yeah, the will cook of the menu at CSB for you...don't be surprised to see things like cock's combs, organ meat...etc. I think is what he is saying.

If that's the case, then CSB is a must. I am an offal devotee.

CSB is about as far as you can get from where you are staying ($30 cab ride) in a distinctly non-urban location--I find the sub-level room gloomy and the cult of Tony Maws a little creepy.

I know for a fact that the T takes me into Harvard Square... how close is CSB to the campus?
O Ya is new face on the Boston scene--innovative sushi, but not open Monday night. (No 9 Park is open on Monday BTW).  Much closer to your hotel.  http://www.boston.com/ae/food/restaurants/...erene_hideaway/

WHS (or anyone else out there who has been to O Ya), please do me a favor and read this post on my blog, and then tell me if you still think I would enjoy eating at O Ya. Thanks!

If you are a sushi purist, Oiishi might be a better option.

Ten minute walk to CSB from Harvard Square T--check their website for directions.

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Thanks, WHS. A 10 minute walk I think I can handle (actually, need, to walk up for and off my meal).

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Oleana was great, though with one less-than-swell dish: the duck schwarma, in fact. The generous duck itself was well prepared -- excellently crispy skin -- but most of the accompaniments were just ok to me, and all were sitting on an uninteresting flatbread. The pickled green tomatoes were outstanding and brought out the best in the duck, but there were only four one-inch wedges.

Love those deviled eggs (though I always want more than one of two halves for $5), really enjoyed the octopus salad (though my dinner partner thought it was uninspiring), and, as always, I adore the lamb steak. Didn't see anything on the dessert menu that we wanted, so we got Turkish coffee.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Oleana was great, though with one less-than-swell dish: the duck schwarma, in fact. The generous duck itself was well prepared -- excellently crispy skin -- but most of the accompaniments were just ok to me, and all were sitting on an uninteresting flatbread. The pickled green tomatoes were outstanding and brought out the best in the duck, but there were only four one-inch wedges.

Love those deviled eggs (though I always want more than one of two halves for $5), really enjoyed the octopus salad (though my dinner partner thought it was uninspiring), and, as always, I adore the lamb steak. Didn't see anything on the dessert menu that we wanted, so we got Turkish coffee.

Thanks for reporting back.

The duck is skin-on? So, what makes it "shawarma?"

Would you still recommend it as a top choice for someone with only two nights and a list of about five restaurants he's considering?

Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I think it's "deconstructed schwarma." If you know what I'm sayin'.

The duck is skin-on. If I had to guess, it's slowly braised or maybe sous vide and then pan-seared to finish and crisp up the skin. Again, it's some fine protein, but the flavors of the duck aren't complimented well by the other items on the plate, save that wondrous pickle. It's just not a powerhouse dish, which it should be.

As for the top-restaurant question, it really depends on what you're looking for. This ain't Per Se, but I don't know of any other restaurant doing such high-quality work with Arabic & Turkish influenced cuisine. Take that octopus salad: I think it's a great take on basic seafood/veg/bean salad, each individual item is done perfectly, and together they sing. But it's octopus salad with beans and cauliflower, dude.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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:laugh: , Yes, I know what you mean. Octopus with beans and cauliflower by any other name is still octopus with beans and cauliflower.

Truth be told, I'm not looking for a per se-like experience; my meal there was rather unspectacular. I would hope that Oleana, or any of the others I'm considering in Boston could do just as well, if not better; perhaps not on ambience or service, but certainly, on food and value.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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The bottom line for Boston is that there is no such thing as dining on a two or even three star (michelin) level. So you are exactly right if you are looking for the interesting one star candidates. And I think Oleana fits the bill perfectly. I don't know of any restaurant where that kind of cuisine is executed at that level. And the price is absolutely right.

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how about the cuban sandwich at chez henri in cambridge?  that would be my one meal if I had to choose.

As in, you'd fly into Boston from out of town, and out of all the meals you could have....?

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I guess that depends on how much you like cuban sandwiches.....

Assuming I had moved away and came back for a day......I think I would go to B&G oysters and have a huge plate of oysters and a bottle of Muscadet. Then over to Oleana and have the vegetarian tasting. For another evening I might consider the chef's whim at Craigie. A while ago I might have thought about having oysters and clams and a pan roasted lobster at Jasper White's shack....but not that cool anymore. Or the best: Hijack a friend's kitchen and buy fish and seafood at New Deal Fish Market and cook yourself.

Maybe the latter is what you should do next time. We could have a egullet cookout.

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  • 5 months later...

How was your visit? I did No 9 Park last time I was in Boston and was quite pleased. Posted photos but don't seem to have written about it.

I'm going to be in Boston next weekend, and like you am looking for a nice dinner - where did you end up and how did you like it?

Edited by Charles Haynes (log)
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The bottom line for Boston is that there is no such thing as dining on a two or even three star (michelin) level. So you are exactly right if you are looking for the interesting one star candidates. And I think Oleana fits the bill perfectly. I don't know of any restaurant where that kind of cuisine is executed at that level. And the price is absolutely right.

I find it very debatable that L'Espalier, for example, would not receive a 2 (maybe even 3) star Michelin rating. I guess we will see when they rate Boston (supposedly next year or the year after.)

Oleana is a wonderful restaurant and one of the most interesting high-end destinations in the city. It is not as formal as L'Espalier, Clio, etc. but the cooking is very inspired. It would be on my short-list of not-to-be-missed restaurants in Boston.

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I find it very debatable that L'Espalier, for example, would not receive a 2 (maybe even 3) star Michelin rating.  I guess we will see when they rate Boston (supposedly next year or the year after.) 

I have to admit that I have not a lot of experience with l'Espalier, but based on what I had I think they need to be happy if they get one *. Even if one takes into account what many people think are slightly lower standards in the US guides, the food to me seemed conceptually and in terms of execution/quality quite a bit away from the American multistar restaurants I have eaten at. Maybe we can make a bet....;-)

Gg

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