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Roast hedgehog


Morten
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I found this articled on timesonline.co.uk

Good old-fashioned British cooking, for most of us, means turkey at Christmas or perhaps fish and chips.

Nettle pudding, roast hedgehog and fish-gut sauce are less likely to feature on a list of traditional favourites.

Yet these are among the earliest delicacies our countrymen tucked into, according to researchers who traced Britain’s culinary history using evidence from recipe books to archaeological artefacts.

timesonline.co.uk

As im a history buff too, i found it interesting to read about a little about how food develops.

Im not certain that a roasted hedgehog would be a headline creating dish if made today :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

http://www.grydeskeen.dk - a danish foodblog :)
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Can you see it in court times, with all the skin carefully stretched back over, each spine in place, for service?

Its right up there with the 4&20 blackbirds.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Not so much a question of history and/or archeology but one of culture. Hedgehogs are still valued fare among many on the Greek mainland as well as among the Bedouins of North Africa, Jordan, Syria and Israel. And small songbirds remain exceedingly popular country fare throughout parts of Greece, Turkey and Corsica.

And don't knock prairie dogs either. Delicious fare when grilled.

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Am I right in thinking european hedgehogs are a bit larger than the ones you see in the pet trade?

I also just had this image of each place setting having a little hedgehog belly up in some strange serving apparatus like a cross between an egg cup and a colander.

Edited by Malkavian (log)
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Regarding hedgehog spines: I recall reading that one traditional method of cooking involved thickly coating the hedgepig in clay and baking it in the embers of the fire. On removing the cooked animal from the ashes one cracked open the clay shell and the spines remained embedded. Pity that the animals are so scarce; I imagine them to be good campfire finger food.

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There is another type of "hedgehog" in early cookbooks (not 6000 years ago of course) - a type of meatloaf or sometimes a pudding stuck with almonds to represent spines. More politically correct nowadays - although PC-ness was hardly an issue centuries ago.

Edited by The Old Foodie (log)

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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I have a feeling timesonline is going to get a lot of angry letters from hedgehog lovers about this recipe. However, unless you live in an area that is abundant in hedgehogs, I can't imagine that most cooks would be willing to pay hundreds of pounds for such a small amount of meat.

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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