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TdeV

TdeV


clarity

I recommend THE SWISS COOKBOOK by Betty Bossi, also printed in German as SCHWIIZER CHUCHI. The page numbers and photos match. It is an updated version of old Swiss recipes by canton in 4 regions. The index is truly appalling. According to Wikipedia, Betty Bossi is a fictional creation by a margarine manufacturer but I have found their recipes quite interesting. 
 
My Swiss friend subscribes to two bimonthly Swiss cooking magazines: one from Betty Bossi and the better one called KOCHEN by Annemarie Wildeisen. I've been reading these recipes (in German) for years. I don't speak German, but I can identify an onion, garlic, etc. As a matter of fact, I rarely am able to have the directions translated, relying instead on the ingredient list and the photos. Once my friend and I both cooked the same recipe and they were totally different dishes! Though, other than baking, I rarely follow recipes exactly.
 
One interesting recipe from KOCHEN is called Cholera Pie which, if I remember correctly, dates from the time people were forbidden from leaving their valley for fear of catching the disease. So, over the winter, supplies got meagre. Inside top and bottom pastry, the pie is made of cooked potatoes, onions, leeks, sour apple, and cheese. Yum!
TdeV

TdeV


clarity

I recommend THE SWISS COOKBOOK by Betty Bossi, also printed in German as SCHWIIZER CHUCHI. The page numbers match. It is an updated version of old Swiss recipes by canton in 4 regions. The index is truly appalling. According to Wikipedia, Betty Bossi is a fictional creation by a margarine manufacturer but I have found their recipes quite interesting. 
 
My Swiss friend subscribes to two bimonthly Swiss cooking magazines: one from Betty Bossi and the better one called KOCHEN by Annemarie Wildeisen. I've been reading these recipes (in German) for years. I don't speak German, but I can identify an onion, garlic, etc. As a matter of fact, I rarely am able to have the directions translated, relying instead on the ingredient list and the photos. Once my friend and I both cooked the same recipe and they were totally different dishes! Though, other than baking, I rarely follow recipes exactly.
 
One interesting recipe from KOCHEN is called Cholera Pie which, if I remember correctly, dates from the time people were forbidden from leaving their valley for fear of catching the disease. Inside top and bottom pastry, the pie is made of cooked potatoes, onions, leeks, sour apple, and cheese. Yum!
TdeV

TdeV

I recommend THE SWISS COOKBOOK by Betty Bossi, also printed in German as SCHWIIZER CHUCHI. The page numbers match. It is an updated version of old Swiss recipes by canton in 4 regions. The index is truly appalling. According to Wikipedia, Betty Bossi is a fictional creation by a margarine manufacturer but I have found these recipes quite interesting. 
 
My Swiss friend subscribes to two bimonthly Swiss cooking magazines: one from Betty Bossi and the better one called KOCHEN by Annemarie Wildeisen. I've been reading these recipes (in German) for years. I don't speak German, but I can identify an onion, garlic, etc. As a matter of fact, I rarely am able to have the directions translated, relying instead on the ingredient list and the photos. Once my friend and I both cooked the same recipe and they were totally different dishes! Though, other than baking, I rarely follow recipes exactly.
 
One interesting recipe from KOCHEN is called Cholera Pie which, if I remember correctly, dates from the time people were forbidden from leaving their valley for fear of catching the disease. Inside top and bottom pastry, the pie is made of cooked potatoes, onions, leeks, sour apple, and cheese. Yum!
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