Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

French Pastry School


artisanbaker
 Share

Recommended Posts

I commonly see this question, and I know I've been personally curious lately, but who is appropriate for these classes and workshops? Is it beginners, pros, in between? What does the typical student look like (skills not appearance :hmmm: )

Here's nightscottsmans write up of his experience at the French Pastry School.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i think it is good to read the descriptions carefully and (realistically) judge your skill level before taking a class. certainly, calling the school to ask them what would be expected of you shouldn't be ruled out.

at the wybauw class, there were people of all levels. there were people who had their own businesses, self-taught professionals, industry professionals...i would say there were about 16-18 people there and there were probably 3 or 4 who shouldn't have been there. in other words, their skill level and their ability to work with other people weren't at an acceptible level. but, i think that is inevitable in this situation because they want to sell out the course and they probably won't turn anyone (with a check or credit card) away.

the problem with this is that it can bring the level of the entire class down if those individuals monopolize the instructor's time/focus. when you're paying $800+ for the class and transportation and lodging...that's a lot of money to pay and you shouldn't have your experience marred by someone who is there to play around.

that being said, i think that if you're a serious home cook/baker, you would be able to take any of the classes offered. if you're there to gawk at pierre herme, maybe you shouldn't take the class. if you're willing to work with other people and pull your own weight and learn what the instructor is teaching, take the class by all means!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i think it is good to read the descriptions carefully and (realistically) judge your skill level before taking a class.  certainly, calling the school to ask them what would be expected of you shouldn't be ruled out.

......

that being said, i think that if you're a serious home cook/baker, you would be able to take any of the classes offered.  if you're there to gawk at pierre herme, maybe you shouldn't take the class.  if you're willing to work with other people and pull your own weight and learn what the instructor is teaching, take the class by all means!

I just got back last night from Chef Norman Love's class on entremet, petits gateux and chocolate decor, and I think you said it very well, Alanamoana. I am not a professional, but a very serious, enthusiastic and skilled amateur. I spoke with Chef Love by phone before registering for the class, and I highly recommend that anyone with doubts do the same if at all possible. Only the Chef will know in detail what skill level he/she will be expecting of the students. The staff at the school, while well-meaning, just won't have more than a general sense of whether a class is "beginning" or "advanced."

That said, I felt it was my responsibility as a relatively inexperienced member of the class to at least comport myself as a complete professional -- to pay close attention to the Chef, to work cleanly and as quickly as possible (and I was glad to note that I was not the slowest in the room), and to engage fully in the experience and give it my full commitment. I think I pulled it off well -- Chef did not coddle me, but he did keep an extra eye in my direction while we were working in teams, which I appreciated. At the end of the day, I don't think I was out of place in the class, and I don't think that Chef Love thought I was out of place there, either. It was an extraordinary experience for me, and I would hate to have missed it out of misplaced trepidation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ruth, your experience is exactly what I meant when I wrote my response. It is by no means only hobbyists who slow the class down. There are "professionals" who have their employer paying for the class and they just play around because they're getting time off work to be at the class. You took advantage of what the class offered and I'm sure you came away with a lot from the experience. That makes you exactly the kind of student they're looking for! :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How was your experience at that class? I wanted to take that class with Norman Love, but registered too late and the class was full. I attended a class earlier this year and absolutely loved it. Eagerly waiting for the next year's schedule, I can see myself registering for a few...

i think it is good to read the descriptions carefully and (realistically) judge your skill level before taking a class.  certainly, calling the school to ask them what would be expected of you shouldn't be ruled out.

......

that being said, i think that if you're a serious home cook/baker, you would be able to take any of the classes offered.  if you're there to gawk at pierre herme, maybe you shouldn't take the class.  if you're willing to work with other people and pull your own weight and learn what the instructor is teaching, take the class by all means!

I just got back last night from Chef Norman Love's class on entremet, petits gateux and chocolate decor, and I think you said it very well, Alanamoana. I am not a professional, but a very serious, enthusiastic and skilled amateur. I spoke with Chef Love by phone before registering for the class, and I highly recommend that anyone with doubts do the same if at all possible. Only the Chef will know in detail what skill level he/she will be expecting of the students. The staff at the school, while well-meaning, just won't have more than a general sense of whether a class is "beginning" or "advanced."

That said, I felt it was my responsibility as a relatively inexperienced member of the class to at least comport myself as a complete professional -- to pay close attention to the Chef, to work cleanly and as quickly as possible (and I was glad to note that I was not the slowest in the room), and to engage fully in the experience and give it my full commitment. I think I pulled it off well -- Chef did not coddle me, but he did keep an extra eye in my direction while we were working in teams, which I appreciated. At the end of the day, I don't think I was out of place in the class, and I don't think that Chef Love thought I was out of place there, either. It was an extraordinary experience for me, and I would hate to have missed it out of misplaced trepidation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How was your experience at that class? I wanted to take that class with Norman Love, but registered too late and the class was full. I attended a class earlier this year and absolutely loved it. Eagerly waiting for the next year's schedule, I can see myself registering for a few...

It was a phenominal experience, and I hope to post at length about it soon. However, I came home to a family crisis and haven't had a chance to get my brain organized. Soon, I hope.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If anyone takes the class, I hope someone will ask Pierre Herme why he's teaching in the US when he won't publish his latest book (Ph10) in English. It just might do the trick.

Always speak your mind. Those who mind don't matter and those who matter won't mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...